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John Corigliano

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October 13, 1991 | WALTER PRICE, Walter Price is a free-lance writer based in New York. and
"It's like getting the Hope Diamond--you know it comes with a curse, but you still want it," says composer John Corigliano, referring to his first opera, "The Ghosts of Versailles," which will have its world premiere at the Metropolitan Opera on Dec. 19. The "diamond," of course, is a debut in one of the most prestigious houses in the world; the curse is that only one world premiere there in the last 50 years (Samuel Barber's "Vanessa") has made it to even a second season.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 2014 | By David Ng
A Friday evening concert at Walt Disney Concert Hall was disrupted by what Los Angeles Philharmonic officials described as a drunk audience member, causing conductor Gustavo Dudamel to halt a performance of John Corigliano's Symphony No. 1 and leave the stage.  A spokeswoman for the orchestra confirmed that an "intoxicated" patron arrived late to the concert on Friday and was prevented by ushers from entering the hall mid-performance, as is...
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 1993 | MARK SWED, Mark Swed is a free-lance writer based in New York.
John Corigliano was hardly unknown before his First Symphony, which had its premiere by the Chicago Symphony in 1990 and has since been performed by dozens of American orchestras and been a bestseller on the Erato label. His "Pied Piper Fantasy," a flute concerto written for James Galway and premiered by the Los Angeles Philharmonic 11 years ago, is one of the best known of modern American concertos. So is his Clarinet Concerto.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 2014 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
John Corigliano wrote his Symphony No. 1 in 1988 on a grand scale for an extravagant-sized orchestra. It is a multi-colored score containing a patchwork quilt of immense emotions. The composer didn't call it a war symphony, but that is what it is, an epic orchestral score for an epic tragedy, the AIDS epidemic. Audiences and orchestras, devastated by what the disease had wrought, understood. The symphony was needed, appreciated and widely played. The urgency of those times is receding into memory, and Corigliano's score is not so much heard any longer.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 2000 | MARK SWED, Mark Swed is The Times' music critic
Accepting an Oscar last month for his score to "The Red Violin," John Corigliano described the difference between his day job as a classical composer and his occasional foray into film work. It's a lonely life for a serious artist sitting by himself in a studio writing a symphony or concerto, he lamented. And movie-making can be a welcome communal respite.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 2014 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
John Corigliano wrote his Symphony No. 1 in 1988 on a grand scale for an extravagant-sized orchestra. It is a multi-colored score containing a patchwork quilt of immense emotions. The composer didn't call it a war symphony, but that is what it is, an epic orchestral score for an epic tragedy, the AIDS epidemic. Audiences and orchestras, devastated by what the disease had wrought, understood. The symphony was needed, appreciated and widely played. The urgency of those times is receding into memory, and Corigliano's score is not so much heard any longer.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 2000
FOREIGN LANGUAGE FILM "All About My Mother" Spain * ART DIRECTION "Sleepy Hollow," Rick Heinrichs (art direction), Peter Young (set decoration) * CINEMATOGRAPHY "American Beauty" Conrad L. Hall * COSTUME DESIGN "Topsy-Turvy" Lindy Hemming * DOCUMENTARY FEATURE "One Day in September" Arthur Cohn, Kevin Macdonald * DOCUMENTARY SHORT SUBJECT "King Gimp" Susan Hannah Hadary, William A.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 18, 1991 | CHRIS PASLES
"People think you get inspired and write a symphony," says composer John Corigliano. "Not even with Beethoven is that true. He was very structurally oriented. He built his pieces and found material to fill them." Initially, Corigliano said, "Beethoven's themes were really stupid. Then he spent a lot of time on them to make them intelligent. . . . "Look at his sketches for the second movement of the 'Emperor' Concerto, for instance. The first time we see sketches of the theme, it's in C major.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 2014 | By David Ng
A Friday evening concert at Walt Disney Concert Hall was disrupted by what Los Angeles Philharmonic officials described as a drunk audience member, causing conductor Gustavo Dudamel to halt a performance of John Corigliano's Symphony No. 1 and leave the stage.  A spokeswoman for the orchestra confirmed that an "intoxicated" patron arrived late to the concert on Friday and was prevented by ushers from entering the hall mid-performance, as is...
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 2008 | Mark Swed, Times Music Critic
The battle of the bands at Walt Disney Concert Hall on Sunday night was massively unfair. In a program dubbed "Wind & Brass Ensembles," USC had the forces -- more than 80 brass, woodwind and percussion players (and even a harp!) -- boldly outnumbering its competition from CalArts and Cal State Northridge. It also had on hand a big-name composer -- John Corigliano -- with an extraordinary, big new piece.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 2000 | MARK SWED, Mark Swed is The Times' music critic
Accepting an Oscar last month for his score to "The Red Violin," John Corigliano described the difference between his day job as a classical composer and his occasional foray into film work. It's a lonely life for a serious artist sitting by himself in a studio writing a symphony or concerto, he lamented. And movie-making can be a welcome communal respite.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2000 | MARK SWED, TIMES MUSIC CRITIC
Sylvia McNair surely didn't choose to be ill last October when she was scheduled to sing a recital at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion. But it almost seems that way. By waiting until Sunday night to reschedule, the popular American soprano was able to include in her program the season's most notable novelty--a song cycle, "Tambourine Man," that John Corigliano has just written for her.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 2000
FOREIGN LANGUAGE FILM "All About My Mother" Spain * ART DIRECTION "Sleepy Hollow," Rick Heinrichs (art direction), Peter Young (set decoration) * CINEMATOGRAPHY "American Beauty" Conrad L. Hall * COSTUME DESIGN "Topsy-Turvy" Lindy Hemming * DOCUMENTARY FEATURE "One Day in September" Arthur Cohn, Kevin Macdonald * DOCUMENTARY SHORT SUBJECT "King Gimp" Susan Hannah Hadary, William A.
NEWS
February 27, 1997 | MARK SWED
Living classical composers, without whom the rest of the Grammys couldn't exist, are usually ghettoized into a single category for classical music. But not this year--John Corigliano, the 59-year-old American composer, was the evening's big winner.
NEWS
February 27, 1997 | MARK SWED
Living classical composers, without whom the rest of the Grammys couldn't exist, are usually ghettoized into a single category for classical music. But not this year--John Corigliano, the 59-year-old American composer, was the evening's big winner.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 1987 | MARTIN BERNHEIMER, Times Music Critic
The Chicago Symphony encountered a little trouble in San Francisco on Saturday. The super-orchestra was ready, willing and able to play a prepackaged program devoted to Richard Wagner, John Corigliano and Ludwig van Beethoven. Unfortunately, the players' scores, formal attire and instruments happened to be stranded somewhere in Arizona. Unfazed by the picturesque perils of modern touring, Sir Georg Solti and his merry band improvised some chamber music.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 1993 | MARK SWED, Mark Swed is a free-lance writer based in New York.
John Corigliano was hardly unknown before his First Symphony, which had its premiere by the Chicago Symphony in 1990 and has since been performed by dozens of American orchestras and been a bestseller on the Erato label. His "Pied Piper Fantasy," a flute concerto written for James Galway and premiered by the Los Angeles Philharmonic 11 years ago, is one of the best known of modern American concertos. So is his Clarinet Concerto.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 9, 1992 | CHRIS PASLES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The little David of the USC Symphony has beaten the mighty Goliath of the Los Angeles Philharmonic to the punch by giving the Los Angeles premiere of John Corigliano's First Symphony, an angry and poignant ode to friends the composer has lost to AIDS. Daniel Lewis will conduct the work on Wednesday at the school's Bovard Auditorium. David Zinman will lead the Philharmonic in the piece in January at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion.
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