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John D Dingell

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April 11, 1991 | JOHN LIPPMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Federal Communications Commission was sharply criticized Wednesday by a congressional committee for its handling of new rules that will permit the TV networks to enter the program syndication business. Rep. John D. Dingell (D-Mich.), chairman of the House Energy and Commerce Committee, charged that "discord and divisiveness" among the five FCC commissioners prevented them from drawing up a new set of "financial interest and syndication rules" that all the parties could find acceptable.
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BUSINESS
December 4, 2007 | Jim Puzzanghera, Times Staff Writer
Two key House lawmakers announced Monday that they were investigating the Federal Communications Commission, accusing its chairman of "possible abuse of power" and a failure to operate fairly and openly in handling proposed cable TV and media ownership regulations. "Given several events and proceedings over the past year, I am rapidly losing confidence that the commission has been conducting its affairs in an appropriate manner," Rep. John D. Dingell (D-Mich.
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NATIONAL
May 7, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
Michigan Rep. John D. Dingell (D-Mich.), who has had the longest tenure in the House, is recovering from an operation to open a blocked artery. Dingell, 76, went to a hospital after experiencing discomfort, his spokesman said. Doctors discovered a small artery was blocked and inserted a stent to open it. The lawmaker is to be discharged today.
NATIONAL
October 11, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
Rep. John D. Dingell (D-Mich.), the longest-serving House member, was recovering after undergoing surgery to replace a stent in an artery, his office said. Dingell, 77, had the stent inserted in May to open a blocked artery. During a follow-up examination, doctors noticed the stent was narrowing and decided to replace it. Dr. Bruce Clemons said Dingell's heart is healthy, according to a statement from the congressman's office.
NEWS
March 6, 1987
A House panel has documents indicating that Federal Railroad Administrator John Riley improperly sought to influence the selection of investment banks to handle the sale of Conrail, Rep. John D. Dingell (D-Mich.) said.
NATIONAL
October 11, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
Rep. John D. Dingell (D-Mich.), the longest-serving House member, was recovering after undergoing surgery to replace a stent in an artery, his office said. Dingell, 77, had the stent inserted in May to open a blocked artery. During a follow-up examination, doctors noticed the stent was narrowing and decided to replace it. Dr. Bruce Clemons said Dingell's heart is healthy, according to a statement from the congressman's office.
NEWS
August 31, 1992 | From The Times' Washington staff
MEMO FLAP: Politics may be Washington's lifeblood, but the chairman of the House Energy and Commerce Committee, Rep. John D. Dingell, is insisting that proprieties be maintained. The Michigan Democrat is irate over White House memoranda supporting President Bush's reelection that recently were circulated to Department of Energy employees. . . . Dingell is demanding an investigation by the General Accounting Office into the incident.
BUSINESS
November 23, 1993 | SCOT J. PALTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hoping to rid the securities business of "truly bad apples," Rep. John D. Dingell (D-Mich.), the powerful chairman of the House Committee on Energy and Commerce, has asked the Securities and Exchange Commission to produce a detailed report on stockbrokers who repeatedly defraud customers. Dingell also requested that the SEC and the General Accounting Office report on whether the nation's stock exchanges are doing enough to weed out "recidivist rogue brokers."
BUSINESS
December 4, 2007 | Jim Puzzanghera, Times Staff Writer
Two key House lawmakers announced Monday that they were investigating the Federal Communications Commission, accusing its chairman of "possible abuse of power" and a failure to operate fairly and openly in handling proposed cable TV and media ownership regulations. "Given several events and proceedings over the past year, I am rapidly losing confidence that the commission has been conducting its affairs in an appropriate manner," Rep. John D. Dingell (D-Mich.
BUSINESS
March 23, 1989 | From Reuters
A costly repair kit for military aircraft that features washers priced at $229.94 each and tiny aluminum braces at $194.97 stirred the powerful chief of a congressional investigative subcommittee to anger Wednesday. Rep. John D. Dingell (D-Mich.), chairman of the House oversight and investigations subcommittee, held up a half-dozen of the high-priced items that are part of a "crash repair kit" for C-5B transport aircraft bought by the Air Force from Lockheed.
NATIONAL
May 7, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
Michigan Rep. John D. Dingell (D-Mich.), who has had the longest tenure in the House, is recovering from an operation to open a blocked artery. Dingell, 76, went to a hospital after experiencing discomfort, his spokesman said. Doctors discovered a small artery was blocked and inserted a stent to open it. The lawmaker is to be discharged today.
NATIONAL
August 6, 2002 | JANET HOOK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He is a Goliath of Congress: John D. Dingell, a Democrat from Michigan, has spent 47 years in the House of Representatives, amassing vast power and using it to grill and intimidate corporate chieftains, Hollywood moguls and other powerful interests that testify at hearings before him. But in a closely watched primary today, Dingell--the longest-serving member of the House--could find himself toppled by an unlikely David: Lynn N.
BUSINESS
July 28, 1994 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an acrimonious congressional hearing Wednesday, NASA officials conceded that they selected Boeing late last year as prime contractor to build the space station--a program dogged by major cost overruns since its inception--even though the firm had flunked the agency's own cost-control reviews.
NEWS
April 21, 1994 | KAREN TUMULTY and EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
House Energy and Commerce Committee Chairman John D. Dingell's prospects for producing a health care bill from his panel brightened Wednesday after he made key concessions to the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries. In a letter to freshman Rep. Lynn Schenk (D-San Diego), the Michigan Democrat promised that he would work to eliminate the Advisory Council on Breakthrough Drugs proposed in President Clinton's health care reform plan.
NEWS
March 22, 1994 | KAREN TUMULTY and EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
House Energy and Commerce Committee Chairman John D. Dingell (D-Mich.), struggling to find a health care reform bill that can pass his committee and ultimately the House, is circulating a plan that would exempt firms with 10 or fewer workers from President Clinton's proposed requirement that they provide health insurance for their workers.
NEWS
March 2, 1994 | Karen Tumulty, Times Staff Writer
And now the real work begins on Capitol Hill. Just about every congressional committee can expect a piece of the action in crafting health care reform, but the bulk of the job will be done by five panels, the first of which will take up the task next week. President Clinton's plan is just a starting point.
NEWS
September 21, 1989 | MICHAEL ROSS, Times Staff Writer
Environmentalists won a major victory Wednesday when a House subcommittee voted unanimously to remove from President Bush's clean air bill a controversial provision allowing automobile manufacturers to "average" tailpipe emissions to meet federal anti-pollution requirements.
BUSINESS
February 16, 1994 | DONALD WOUTAT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two powerful Michigan lawmakers accused Gov. Pete Wilson on Tuesday of secretly offering to relax California's electric-car mandate in return for a pledge from the U.S. auto industry to move jobs to the state. Wilson's top environmental aide denied the charge as "flatly wrong and spurious," but Rep. John Dingell and Sen.
BUSINESS
November 23, 1993 | SCOT J. PALTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hoping to rid the securities business of "truly bad apples," Rep. John D. Dingell (D-Mich.), the powerful chairman of the House Committee on Energy and Commerce, has asked the Securities and Exchange Commission to produce a detailed report on stockbrokers who repeatedly defraud customers. Dingell also requested that the SEC and the General Accounting Office report on whether the nation's stock exchanges are doing enough to weed out "recidivist rogue brokers."
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