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John D Ehrlichman

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NEWS
August 14, 1987 | RONALD J. OSTROW, Times Staff Writer
John D. Ehrlichman, former President Richard M. Nixon's chief domestic adviser, has asked President Reagan to pardon his conviction for conspiring to cover up the Watergate scandal, Justice Department officials said Thursday. Now a writer in Santa Fe, N.M., Ehrlichman, 62, applied for presidential clemency on May 28 and is the subject of an FBI background investigation, according to David C. Stephenson, the Justice Department's pardon attorney.
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NEWS
February 16, 1999 | ALISSA J. RUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John D. Ehrlichman, the top domestic policy advisor to President Nixon who went to prison for his role in the Watergate scandal, died at his home in Atlanta on Sunday. He was 73. He had suffered from diabetes, his son, Tom, said Monday in announcing the death. Ehrlichman served 18 months in prison in the late 1970s after he was found guilty of obstruction of justice, conspiracy and perjury.
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NEWS
February 16, 1999 | ALISSA J. RUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John D. Ehrlichman, the top domestic policy advisor to President Nixon who went to prison for his role in the Watergate scandal, died at his home in Atlanta on Sunday. He was 73. He had suffered from diabetes, his son, Tom, said Monday in announcing the death. Ehrlichman served 18 months in prison in the late 1970s after he was found guilty of obstruction of justice, conspiracy and perjury.
NEWS
November 30, 1996 | GEORGE LARDNER JR., THE WASHINGTON POST
The president seemed to be sloshed. It was late on the night of April 30, 1973, and President Nixon had just finished a special address to the nation on the Watergate scandal, announcing the departures of his two top aides, H.R. Haldeman and John D. Ehrlichman. He was feeling blue. Fifty minutes after he'd finished talking, hardly anyone had called to tell Nixon what a great speech he'd made. So he spoke to Haldeman.
NEWS
November 30, 1996 | GEORGE LARDNER JR., THE WASHINGTON POST
The president seemed to be sloshed. It was late on the night of April 30, 1973, and President Nixon had just finished a special address to the nation on the Watergate scandal, announcing the departures of his two top aides, H.R. Haldeman and John D. Ehrlichman. He was feeling blue. Fifty minutes after he'd finished talking, hardly anyone had called to tell Nixon what a great speech he'd made. So he spoke to Haldeman.
NEWS
May 5, 1987 | PAUL HOUSTON and ROBERT L. JACKSON, Times Staff Writers
Less than two months after the 1972 Watergate break-in, President Richard M. Nixon directed his aides to search for embarrassing information in the income tax files of Democratic presidential nominee George S. McGovern and Lawrence F. O'Brien, chairman of the Democratic National Committee, according to Nixon White House papers released Monday by the National Archives.
NEWS
January 30, 1987
The National Archives announced that it would give notice today that it intends to open for public viewing the most sensitive of the papers seized from Richard M. Nixon when he resigned as President--including nearly 140,000 pages of documents considered to be Nixon's personal papers. The date of the opening was set for May 4, provided none of the principals objects before a May 1 deadline. The collection includes the papers of 37 of Nixon's aides, including Charles W. Colson, John W.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 14, 1986 | Associated Press
Five pages of doodles and notes by Nixon White House aide John D. Ehrlichman have been auctioned for $2,050, and a lawyer who was one of the buyers says it will remind him of the damage his profession can do. Ehrlichman, who was chief domestic adviser to former President Richard M. Nixon and served 18 months in prison for Watergate offenses, sent the autographed items to auctioneer Herman Darvick to determine their worth. One sketch, of former Atty. Gen.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 25, 2001 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Kenneth Reese Cole Jr., an assistant to two presidents, died Aug. 16 in his sleep at his summer home in Willsboro, N.Y. He was 63. Born in New York City, Cole served as the director of the White House's Domestic Council under Presidents Richard Nixon and Gerald Ford. In December 1972, Nixon named Cole to the post, which had been held since its creation in 1970 by John D. Ehrlichman, the president's chief assistant for domestic affairs. Cole, then 33, had been Ehrlichman's deputy for three years.
NEWS
December 8, 1996 | From Reuters
Newly released tapes show President Nixon pushed for tax audits of wealthy Jewish contributors to his Democratic rivals, the San Francisco Examiner reported in today's editions. The Examiner said the revelation was contained in more than 200 hours of recently released Nixon White House tapes.
NEWS
August 14, 1987 | RONALD J. OSTROW, Times Staff Writer
John D. Ehrlichman, former President Richard M. Nixon's chief domestic adviser, has asked President Reagan to pardon his conviction for conspiring to cover up the Watergate scandal, Justice Department officials said Thursday. Now a writer in Santa Fe, N.M., Ehrlichman, 62, applied for presidential clemency on May 28 and is the subject of an FBI background investigation, according to David C. Stephenson, the Justice Department's pardon attorney.
NEWS
May 5, 1987 | PAUL HOUSTON and ROBERT L. JACKSON, Times Staff Writers
Less than two months after the 1972 Watergate break-in, President Richard M. Nixon directed his aides to search for embarrassing information in the income tax files of Democratic presidential nominee George S. McGovern and Lawrence F. O'Brien, chairman of the Democratic National Committee, according to Nixon White House papers released Monday by the National Archives.
BUSINESS
May 15, 1987 | BRUCE HOROVITZ, Times Staff Writer
John D. Ehrlichman has been given the boot, again. This time, he's being dumped by Dreyer's Grand Ice Cream--the Oakland-based company for which he has made a provocative television commercial. Ehrlichman, a top White House aide under Richard M. Nixon who went to prison for conspiracy, obstruction of justice and perjury, was featured as a so-called "unbelieveable spokesman" for the low-fat ice cream that recently began to advertise itself as "unbelieveably good."
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