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John D Hertz

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 22, 1997 | DARRELL SATZMAN
Entrepreneur John D. Hertz, who founded the Yellow Cab Co. in 1913 and later went on to own the world's largest car-rental company, left an indelible mark on the San Fernando Valley when in the 1950s he constructed an enormous bomb shelter on his expansive West Valley ranch. The shelter, which still exists, cost $89,000 and was considered a masterpiece of engineering. Shaped like a submarine, it had bath facilities, an elevator, an electric kitchen and sleeping accommodations for 30 people.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 22, 1997 | DARRELL SATZMAN
Entrepreneur John D. Hertz, who founded the Yellow Cab Co. in 1913 and later went on to own the world's largest car-rental company, left an indelible mark on the San Fernando Valley when in the 1950s he constructed an enormous bomb shelter on his expansive West Valley ranch. The shelter, which still exists, cost $89,000 and was considered a masterpiece of engineering. Shaped like a submarine, it had bath facilities, an elevator, an electric kitchen and sleeping accommodations for 30 people.
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SPORTS
August 24, 1986 | Associated Press
Taylor's Special smashed the six-furlong record at Arlington Park Friday when he zipped to a seven-length victory in the $79,100 Isaac Murphy Handicap. The 5-year-old son of Hawkin's Special, carrying 118 pounds, was timed in 1:08 without being being pushed by jockey Pat Day. The time was two-fifths of a second faster than the record set by 7-year-old Holding Pattern under 114 pounds in 1978.
SPORTS
January 24, 1992 | BILL CHRISTINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The pitfalls of being a contract rider for a racing stable are unavoidable, and Pat Valenzuela, who has signed on as owner Allen Paulson's first-call jockey for this year, cannot expect to escape them. The best example of a jockey getting himself trapped because of a contract is Heliodoro Gustines, who in the 1970s was the regular rider for Martha Gerry's Forego, while his first obligation was to John Hay (Jock) Whitney's Greentree Stable.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 8, 1997
For 200 days, to commemorate the bicentennial of the San Fernando Mission, the Valley Edition has been featuring daily, thumbnail portraits of people who have left their mark on the area. Reflecting the vast tapestry that has become the San Fernando Valley, the Valley 200 series has featured artists, authors, business people and community activists. It wrote about infamous Valley criminals as well as educational pioneers and a variety of entertainers.
SPORTS
June 5, 2003 | Associated Press
*--* The horses who have won thoroughbred racing's Triple Crown -- victories in the Kentucky Derby, Preakness Stakes and Belmont Stakes. Funny Cide can become 12th horse to accomplish the feat with a victory in the Belmont on Saturday: 1919: SIR BARTON Jockey: Johnny Loftus. Trainer: Guy Bedwell. Owner: J.K.L. Ross.
SPORTS
February 15, 2003 | Bill Christine, Times Staff Writer
Johnny Longden, once horse racing's winningest jockey, and the only horseman to win the Kentucky Derby as a rider and a trainer, died Friday in his sleep, on his 96th birthday. Longden, who retired as a jockey in 1966 and from training horses in 1990, suffered a stroke last August and had been bedridden in his Banning home for the last four months. Of all the horse races Johnny Longden won -- 6,032 as a jockey and 370 as a trainer -- two counted the most.
NEWS
June 4, 1986 | BOB POOL, Times Staff Writer
The radioactive cloud from Chernobyl was headed his way. So James Brawner did the most prudent thing he could think of the day that the Soviets tersely disclosed that their power plant had sustained "an accident." The 27-year-old manager of a Canoga Park auto-repair shop took a stack of printed yellow flyers with him to a Ventura Freeway off-ramp in Woodland Hills and spent three hours handing out 300 of them to motorists. "Warning," stated Brawner's flyer.
NEWS
December 15, 1993 | BURT A. FOLKART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Myrna Loy, whose film career languished when she portrayed exotic vamps but blossomed in the elegant glow she cast as the Thin Man's loving but acerbic wife, died Tuesday. Miss Loy, once heralded as "The Queen of the Movies," was 88 and died at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York after a lengthy, undisclosed illness.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 2, 1986 | BOB POOL, Times Staff Writer
The radioactive cloud from Chernobyl was headed his way. So James Brawner did the most prudent thing he could think of the day that the Soviets tersely disclosed that their power plant had sustained "an accident." The 27-year-old manager of a Canoga Park auto-repair shop took a stack of printed yellow flyers with him to a Ventura Freeway off-ramp in Woodland Hills and spent three hours handing out 300 of them to motorists. "Warning," stated Brawner's flyer.
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