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John David Keller

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January 4, 1985 | HERMAN WONG, Times Staff Writer
This month, South Coast Repertory breaks into the world of cable television in a big way with "Finding Home," SCR's 1984 Educational Touring Production on the immigrant experience. Starting Monday , a videotaped performance of the children's musical--which was a hit on the grade-school circuit last year--will be aired on 10 cable television systems in Orange, Los Angeles and San Diego counties.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 11, 1990 | JAN HERMAN
Four months in Singapore working as a theater director was more than enough for John-David Keller, who is back 22 pounds lighter at South Coast Repertory where he has just staged the annual holiday production of "A Christmas Carol." Keller went to that equatorial Asian city-state in June as one of the SCR entourage invited to participate in the Singapore Festival of Arts. After playing Mr.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 11, 1990 | JAN HERMAN
Four months in Singapore working as a theater director was more than enough for John-David Keller, who is back 22 pounds lighter at South Coast Repertory where he has just staged the annual holiday production of "A Christmas Carol." Keller went to that equatorial Asian city-state in June as one of the SCR entourage invited to participate in the Singapore Festival of Arts. After playing Mr.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 4, 1985 | HERMAN WONG, Times Staff Writer
This month, South Coast Repertory breaks into the world of cable television in a big way with "Finding Home," SCR's 1984 Educational Touring Production on the immigrant experience. Starting Monday , a videotaped performance of the children's musical--which was a hit on the grade-school circuit last year--will be aired on 10 cable television systems in Orange, Los Angeles and San Diego counties.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 5, 1990 | JAN HERMAN
The Straits Times, Singapore's most prominent newspaper, gave South Coast Repertory's "You Never Can Tell" a mixed review. It called the production "well-crafted," the sets "superbly adaptable" and the costumes "charming." But the show "failed to engage the emotions." Richard Doyle was praised for his "commanding presence" and John-David Keller for his "poignant" performance.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 1996 | LAURIE WINER, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
If you're looking for a classic holiday tale performed by a large cast and you don't want to sit next to a Trekker, head on over to South Coast Repertory for its annual production of "A Christmas Carol." (By contrast, the one-man version by Patrick [Capt. Jean-Luc Picard] Stewart can be seen at the Doolittle in Los Angeles through Dec. 22.) SCR is rolling out its staging of the Dickens tale for the 17th yuletide.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 1995 | T.H. McCULLOH
When Charles Dickens wrote "A Christmas Carol," he wasn't writing a children's story. Most dramatizations ignore this in favor of pure entertainment. But Jerry Patch's version at South Coast Repertory vividly honors Dickens' intent and delivers bang-up entertainment. To its immense advantage, the production has grown darker since its early years, which makes it richer for adults, and has developed its special effects with panache, a boon for both kids and their elders.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 11, 1990 | JAN HERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As Ebenezer Scrooge plunges headlong with the rest of us into an apparently nasty decade filled with omens of war and hard times, his redemption through generosity and kindness would seem to have a special significance. Whatever the reason, Hal Landon Jr. has turned serious as Charles Dickens' notorious miser. He brings a far more provocative dimension to his perennial starring role in South Coast Repertory's adaptation of "A Christmas Carol" than the caricature depicted last year.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 4, 1995 | T. H. McCULLOH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When Charles Dickens wrote "A Christmas Carol," he wasn't writing a children's story. He was trying to make a strong, emotional case for social reform and for a drastic change in the public's accepting attitudes toward avarice, ambition and self-interest. Most stage and film versions of the story ignore the author's intent in favor of pure entertainment.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 4, 2001 | MICHAEL PHILLIPS, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
The problem with a lot of Scrooges is simple, really. In this season of "A Christmas Carol"s wide and far, you tend to find Scrooges that aren't Scrooges at all; they're just character actors having a little too much fun playing a mean guy. The Charles Dickens character's harshness, loneliness and eventual joyous transformation are conveyed as a series of winks, aimed at an audience all too familiar with the narrative. So it's a very pleasant surprise to see how well Hal Landon Jr.
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