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John Dean

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NEWS
March 19, 1986 | From Associated Press
A lawsuit has been filed in Los Angeles against John Dean, a former White House adviser who played a prominent role in the Watergate scandal, over the sale of $320,000 worth of securities. The suit, filed Monday in U.S. District Court, alleges that Dean and his wife, Maureen, violated federal securities law in the sale of 800,000 shares of stock issued by Coelco Ltd. of Fountain Valley, a holding company. The suit was filed by Durango International Corp.
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NEWS
February 24, 2014 | By Michael A. Memoli
WASHINGTON -- Michigan Rep. John Dingell, the dean of the House and the most tenured lawmaker in the history of Congress, will retire at the end of his current term, he announced Monday. Dingell told newspapers in his Detroit-area district that he won't seek a 31st term this year, ending a nearly six decade-long career in Washington. A formal announcement will come later Monday. “I'm not going to be carried out feet first,” Dingell told the Detroit News. "I don't want people to say I stayed too long.
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NEWS
July 14, 1987 | United Press International
Lt. Col. Oliver L. North faces certain conviction for his role in the Iran- contra scandal, a debacle that makes Watergate look like a "Little League" affair, key Watergate witness John W. Dean III writes in Newsweek magazine. In an essay for the July 20 issue, Dean said he would be surprised if North and others escape the justice system, because Washington juries are predisposed against "big shots who have been in government." Dean, who was President Richard M.
BUSINESS
February 17, 2008 | From Times Wires Services
The cartoonish plastic frog with bulging eyes could be a children's toy -- but for the torch-like flame that bursts from the novelty lighter's head. "They look like something you would get in a McDonald's Happy Meal," said John Dean, president of the National Assn. of State Fire Marshals. Dean's group is pushing to ban novelty lighters. In California, Washington and Arkansas, local ordinances have been passed to keep the lighters off store shelves. Novelty lighters can look like tiny skateboards, cellphones, animals, even butterflies.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 2004 | John M. Glionna, Times Staff Writer
Striding across the lobby of the Burbank Hilton, John W. Dean III doesn't look much like a wanted man, someone on the short list to become Republican Enemy No. 1. The rimless glasses, blue sports coat and walking shoes appear more professorial than his political resume might indicate: former White House counsel alternately dismissed by various camps as a squealer, world-class snitch and chief whistle-blower to one of the most notorious burglaries in American history.
NEWS
October 28, 1987 | NIKKI FINKE, Times Staff Writer
That summer of 1973, she was the perfect Washington wife, standing by her man no matter what. Impeccably dressed, flawlessly made up, her hair pulled back into a polished bun, she mesmerized the nation with the silent vigil she kept behind her husband's witness table day after day at the Watergate hearings while his testimony brought down a President. What a difference 14 years can make. Yes, she still is married to John Dean, only now they live in Coldwater Canyon.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 14, 1986
Fred R. Hofeld, (Letters, May 2) described former Budget Director Davis A. Stockman as the John Dean of the Reagan Administration. As I remember, John Dean spoke the truth. JOE STOPPELLI Palm Desert
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 2, 1986
With the release of David Stockman's book, "The Triumph of Politics," his appearances on TV and the Newsweek magazine excerpts, it would appear that the former budget director is the John Dean of the Reagan Administration. FRED R. HOFELD Los Angeles
NEWS
January 26, 1989 | ANN CONWAY
It was with some irony that former Arizona Sen. Barry M. Goldwater and Maureen (Mo) Dean--wife of Watergate figure John Dean--came together on Sunday to sign their best-selling books for supporters of the Orange County Trauma Society. In his book, a give-'em-hell account of his career, Goldwater ardently denounces Watergate and mentions John Dean, then in the Nixon Administration: "A tape from March 22, 1973, was particularly damning.
NEWS
March 3, 1985 | KEVIN KLOSE, The Washington Post
When a dilapidated town house on an otherwise vacant lot in a decrepit West Side neighborhood collapsed here last month, a man about 40 was caught inside. The abandoned building had no interior walls, and badly damaged exterior walls had held up the swaying rafters and the handsome, cut-stone front that had faced the street for much of this century. The dwelling tumbled down with barely an instant's warning. The man inside never had a chance. Police came, but it did not matter.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 2007 | Bill Boyarsky, Special to The Times
IN a media world where frightened editors worry about ever-more fickle readers, viewers and Web surfers, it takes a courageous journalist to approach the boss with an idea for a story on political "process." Today's news must be hot and a pitch for a story on a vague, bland concept that doesn't instantly translate into "hits" takes some amount of guts, believe it or not. Still, despite the demands of the news business, process is important. Often it's everything, as John W.
OPINION
August 2, 2004
Re "Deep Down, They Love the Guy," Commentary, July 29: Max Boot may be right that we liberals have all been made exquisitely wealthy by the Bush years, but he inadvertently makes a convincing pitch for divided government. As he says, governing should involve compromises and trade-offs that Republicans, controlling all branches of government, have had precious little need of. Bringing a little balance to our government this November would give the people the benefits of division, liberals a taste of the access they crave while preserving the fun of protest, and Boot some of the prosperity he seems to assume we've been hoarding the last four years.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 2004 | John M. Glionna, Times Staff Writer
Striding across the lobby of the Burbank Hilton, John W. Dean III doesn't look much like a wanted man, someone on the short list to become Republican Enemy No. 1. The rimless glasses, blue sports coat and walking shoes appear more professorial than his political resume might indicate: former White House counsel alternately dismissed by various camps as a squealer, world-class snitch and chief whistle-blower to one of the most notorious burglaries in American history.
BOOKS
April 25, 2004 | Anthony Lewis, Anthony Lewis is a former New York Times columnist and author of "Gideon's Trumpet" and "Make No Law."
After all the conflict over former President Nixon's tapes and papers, Congress in 1978 passed a law to regulate the handling of such records. The Presidential Records Act gave former presidents 12 years to control their records, presumably to write memoirs. Then they were to become public property, open to all. The last of President Reagan's documents still withheld from release by the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library were to be open, under the law, on Jan.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 30, 2003 | Mark Sachs, Times Staff Writer
In the wee hours of June 17, 1972, a young, long-haired undercover cop at a Washington hotel clicked on his flashlight and spotted five burglars in business suits rummaging through the national headquarters of the Democratic Party. Twenty-six months later, President Richard M. Nixon would climb into a helicopter revving up on the White House lawn and leave the residence for good, his legacy seemingly in shambles.
OPINION
June 17, 2003 | Robert Scheer, Robert Scheer writes a weekly column for The Times.
What did the president know and when did he know it? The answer to that question forced the resignation of Richard Nixon as he was about to be impeached. Now, with President Bush facing that same question, congressional Republicans have circled the wagons to prevent a public hearing on whether intelligence was distorted by the White House to convince us of the need for war. Why? Because public hearings could lead to public demands for impeachment. Sound far-fetched?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 27, 1987
When the hearings began a few weeks ago, most of the press and TV commentators were pointing out the Iran-contra investigation had far greater implications than Watergate. While they were sharpening their knives for the President, a funny thing happened on the way to the forum. Lt. Col. Oliver North and Rear Adm. John Poindexter appeared rather than a John Dean. Thank you gentlemen for saving our nation from another hand-wringing experience of seeing a great President brought to his knees and possibly impeached.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 24, 1989
On behalf of all the residents in North City West, and particularly those of us who live in the Carmel Valley area, I want to thank the San Diego Fire Department as well as the other state and local fire departments that helped fight the Nov. 28 and Dec. 3 fires. Eighty-foot-high flames swept up the hillside, driven by 50-mile-an-hour winds. We watched the fire explode out of the canyons and spread so fast, we were genuinely horrified and terrified. And, as if one fire wasn't enough, five days later the second fire struck.
NATIONAL
February 18, 2003 | Elizabeth Mehren, Times Staff Writer
Even by the standards of the Nixon White House, the plan to blow up Washington's preeminent think tank seemed crazy, presidential counselor John W. Dean III recalled here Monday. But there was White House aide John Ehrlichman on the phone one day in 1971, telling Dean that "Chuck Colson wants me to firebomb the Brookings [Institution]." Describing the incident Monday to several hundred presidential history junkies at the John F. Kennedy Library and Museum, Dean said he was dumbfounded.
OPINION
June 23, 2002
John Dean's eulogy-redux to Richard Nixon is almost as tragic as Nixon's ignominious Watergate-forced departure from office (Commentary, June 17). Dean alternately coos and sobs over Nixon without ever conceding that Nixon couldn't have done it without Dean's initial compliance. But perhaps most tragic, in current politics, is White House political advisor Karl Rove's troubling comment: "Is there something specific we've drawn from Nixon? I'm not aware." He has apparently learned nothing from history and may have doomed the rest of us to repeat it. Allan Rabinowitz Los Angeles Now that the Watergate scandal has reached its 30th anniversary, the big question is: Has it had any significant impact to positively influence our political culture?
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