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John Delaney

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NEWS
April 4, 2012 | By Kim Geiger
Defying much of the state party establishment, Democrats in Maryland's 6 th Congressional District chose businessman John Delaney to challenge Republican Rep. Roscoe Bartlett this fall in a district that could help the party regain control of the House of Representatives. Delaney, who was endorsed by former President Bill Clinton and the Washington Post, defeated state Sen. Rob Garagiola, a rising star in Annapolis who had the backing of Gov. Martin O'Malley and a number of other prominent Maryland Democrats.
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NEWS
April 4, 2012 | By Kim Geiger
Defying much of the state party establishment, Democrats in Maryland's 6 th Congressional District chose businessman John Delaney to challenge Republican Rep. Roscoe Bartlett this fall in a district that could help the party regain control of the House of Representatives. Delaney, who was endorsed by former President Bill Clinton and the Washington Post, defeated state Sen. Rob Garagiola, a rising star in Annapolis who had the backing of Gov. Martin O'Malley and a number of other prominent Maryland Democrats.
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MAGAZINE
October 3, 2004 | Douglas Gantenbein, Douglas Gantenbein is a freelance writer living in Port Townsend, Wash.
Exploring the ocean traditionally has been like studying the South Pole one ice cube at a time. Oceanographic research vessels are scarce and operate at the whim of weather. Clouds can block satellite-based cameras and sensors. And deep-sea submarines are wildly expensive and difficult to use. The result is that our understanding of the ocean consists of scattered snapshots that don't do much more than hint at what really goes on beneath the waves. John Delaney wants to change this.
MAGAZINE
October 3, 2004 | Douglas Gantenbein, Douglas Gantenbein is a freelance writer living in Port Townsend, Wash.
Exploring the ocean traditionally has been like studying the South Pole one ice cube at a time. Oceanographic research vessels are scarce and operate at the whim of weather. Clouds can block satellite-based cameras and sensors. And deep-sea submarines are wildly expensive and difficult to use. The result is that our understanding of the ocean consists of scattered snapshots that don't do much more than hint at what really goes on beneath the waves. John Delaney wants to change this.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 25, 1995
That article about the GOP (Dec. 9) was a joke, right? The GOP is asking our elected GOP representatives to sign an oath of loyalty to the GOP? This is the Sacramento chapter of Newt's GOP, right? If there weren't already enough reasons for me to feel good about changing from a Republican to a Democrat four years ago, this ought to about do it, no? I can't muster up the words to share with you how completely disgusted I am over this. Our elected officials are bound to be loyal to us, not some excuse for a college fraternity or men's club wallowing in its own overinflated sense of self-worth.
NEWS
March 22, 2003 | From Reuters
While pundits around the globe speculated on the fate of Iraqi President Saddam Hussein, others were putting money on it. Offering wagers on the outcome of the war in Iraq has been scorned as distasteful by major bookmakers from London to Las Vegas, but several Web sites are allowing gamblers to put money on whether Hussein will survive. On Tradesports.com, people can buy contracts for $10 on future events and trade them.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 19, 1998
Re "The New Censorship: Controversy in a 'Smiley Face' Culture," Opinion, June 7: Todd Gitlin needs to become a little more friendly with his dictionary before he throws around words like "censorship." The efforts of the Catholic League and others to oppose Terrence McNally's play, "'Corpus Christi" (whose offensive portrayal of Jesus having sex with his apostles has been confirmed by a New York Times reporter who read the script), constitute not censorship, but American democracy in action.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 31, 1995
Hey, I got my 15 minutes this week. Albeit vicariously, compliments of Bill Gates and the Windows '95 release. All of the sudden every techno phreak, computer nerd, propeller head in the world was part of something that was hip. Complete with cool videos and the Stones even. Well, don't go out and spring for new pocket protectors over it. This is the beginning of mass commercialization of the computer. Those who have nurtured this business along for the past 40 or so years will soon settle into the same comfortable niche as the phone man, or the cable guy. Keepers of a technology America will live on but never truly understand or care to. We will become indispensable as the knowledge gap widens between the us and the end user.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 22, 1997
Re "Reclaimed Waste Water May Ease State's Thirst," Aug. 17: I was portrayed as one of the "crusaders" for increased use of recycled water and as making "the point by gulping down a long, cool glass of tertiary effluent." While the point is exactly correct, the imagery is misleading. I would gulp down tertiary effluent to demonstrate my confidence in its safety--if pressed to do so. However, I also would point out that tertiary effluent is not quite at the quality level for everyday drinking purposes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 14, 1996 | JOANNA M. MILLER
There were snowball fights and sled runs, lots of squeals and a few tears Tuesday as 250 preschool children and their parents romped on a hill of man-made snow at Horizon Hills School in Thousand Oaks. Some clad in snowsuits and gloves, others wearing shorts and tennis shoes, the kids took turns riding sleds or plastic garbage can tops down a short run made with 20 tons of shaved ice.
BUSINESS
February 15, 1998
"TCI Opts for Java, Foiling Microsoft's Cable TV Bid" [Jan. 10] exaggerates the decision's significance to Sun and gives scarce mention of the true impact of TCI's action. Simply put, TCI has cast a major vote in support of open-technology standards and free-market management of the technology sector. TCI knows open standards eliminate monopolistic control of core technology. TCI also knows this can lower the cost of technology to TCI and the rest of us. TCI and other communication vendors must work to force down the cost of Internet technologies.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 20, 2001
Re "GOP Bypasses the Bipartisan Truce," Oct. 14: The House Republicans oppose having the federal government take over airport security, with the higher wages and higher training and performance standards expected of federal employees, because it would cost too much (even though the Senate plan includes a $2.50 surcharge per ticket to offset the higher cost). Yet we have federal employees (of the USDA) at airports to inspect the baggage of passengers arriving from foreign lands for prohibited foods and plants that may harbor exotic pests.
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