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John Demjanjuk

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 18, 1993
John Demjanjuk should be allowed to remain in the United States ("U.S. Court Calls for Return of Demjanjuk," Aug. 4). His extradition to Israel is a typical example of our persistent kowtowing to Israel. After eight years in solitary confinement in an Israeli prison, this man has been punished sufficiently, and perhaps wrongly. His age, his family, and his years as a law-abiding citizen should be taken into account. After 50 years it is time to forgive and forget. Israel and America have been guilty of plenty of atrocities against defenseless civilians.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 2012 | By Henry Chu, Los Angeles Times
Reporting from London -- John Demjanjuk, a retired Ohio autoworker convicted of serving as a guard at a Nazi extermination camp and being complicit in the deaths of more than 28,000 people, died Saturday in Germany. He was 91. Demjanjuk died in a nursing home in southern Germany as a prisoner of failing health but not of the justice system that found him guilty last year of being an accessory to mass murder. A German judge had sentenced him to five years behind bars, but he was allowed his freedom while he launched an appeal.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 2012 | By Henry Chu, Los Angeles Times
Reporting from London -- John Demjanjuk, a retired Ohio autoworker convicted of serving as a guard at a Nazi extermination camp and being complicit in the deaths of more than 28,000 people, died Saturday in Germany. He was 91. Demjanjuk died in a nursing home in southern Germany as a prisoner of failing health but not of the justice system that found him guilty last year of being an accessory to mass murder. A German judge had sentenced him to five years behind bars, but he was allowed his freedom while he launched an appeal.
WORLD
May 13, 2011 | By Janet Stobart, Los Angeles Times
John Demjanjuk, a 91-year-old retired autoworker from Ohio, was found guilty of accessory to murder and sentenced to five years in prison by a German court Thursday for his part in the killings of about 28,000 Jews at a Nazi concentration camp during World War II. Judge Ralph Alt said he would allow Demjanjuk to be free pending an expected appeal. The defendant attended court in a wheelchair and the 18-month trial had been suspended several times because of his poor health. His lawyer, Ulrich Busch, was quoted by the Associated Press as saying his client was "just a scapegoat for the Germans; he has to pay for all the mistakes they made in the past and that's not justice.
WORLD
December 4, 2009 | By Kate Connolly
Martin Haas struggled to hold back tears as he recalled how in 1943 his life was saved thanks only to the actions of a quick-thinking family friend. "I remember that it was a rainy day," the 73-year-old UC San Diego oncologist said in slow but measured German. "The woman hid me under her cape, and took me away just in time." The 7-year-old Haas found shelter with a Catholic family in the Dutch countryside as the German Gestapo began rounding up members of his family and other Jews in the Netherlands, he said this week in a Munich, Germany, courtroom.
NEWS
March 1, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
John Demjanjuk, convicted as the brutal Nazi camp guard "Ivan the Terrible" and sentenced to death in Jerusalem, is threatening to begin a hunger strike to protest the delay in a ruling on his appeal. The 72-year-old former Ohio auto worker, who is starting his eighth year in solitary confinement, will drink only water to dramatize his nearly nine-month wait for the Supreme Court to rule, his lawyer said. A five-judge Supreme Court panel wound up hearings on Demjanjuk's appeal on June 9.
NEWS
February 22, 2002 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A quarter-century after prosecutors first accused him of being a Nazi death camp guard, retired Cleveland auto worker John Demjanjuk was stripped of his U.S. citizenship Thursday by a federal judge who concluded that the 81-year-old Ukrainian native concealed his wartime activities when he immigrated to the United States.
NEWS
November 14, 1992 | ERIC HARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The former chief of the Justice Department division charged with pursuing Nazi war criminals denied Friday that the department "stonewalled" defense attorneys seeking evidence to clear their client. Lawyers for John Demjanjuk contend that as a result of the department's suppression of evidence, the 72-year-old retired auto worker from Cleveland was wrongly extradited to Israel, where he was convicted of war crimes in 1988.
NEWS
July 14, 2001 | ERIC SLATER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Twenty-four years ago this summer, the U.S. Justice Department made a remarkable allegation: One of World War II's most notorious and malevolent practitioners of genocide was not only alive and well, he was living in Cleveland. "Ivan the Terrible," the government said, who drunkenly beat Jews as they entered the gas chambers at Treblinka, then turned on the gas himself before heading out to rape local girls, now had a wife, two children and a yellow-brick house in the suburbs.
WORLD
February 6, 2010 | By Megan K. Stack
The witness has grown old and sick. He sits propped on pillows while the snow piles up outside. Recovering from a stroke, he languishes in a cramped apartment because his legs are too frail to negotiate five flights of stairs. His name is Alexei Vaitsen. He is one of the few Jews to survive the torments of the Nazis' Sobibor death camp and the only member of his family who lived to see the end of World War II. His thoughts these days are hundreds of miles away, in a distant courtroom where the fate of another sick old man is being weighed.
WORLD
February 6, 2010 | By Megan K. Stack
The witness has grown old and sick. He sits propped on pillows while the snow piles up outside. Recovering from a stroke, he languishes in a cramped apartment because his legs are too frail to negotiate five flights of stairs. His name is Alexei Vaitsen. He is one of the few Jews to survive the torments of the Nazis' Sobibor death camp and the only member of his family who lived to see the end of World War II. His thoughts these days are hundreds of miles away, in a distant courtroom where the fate of another sick old man is being weighed.
WORLD
December 4, 2009 | By Kate Connolly
Martin Haas struggled to hold back tears as he recalled how in 1943 his life was saved thanks only to the actions of a quick-thinking family friend. "I remember that it was a rainy day," the 73-year-old UC San Diego oncologist said in slow but measured German. "The woman hid me under her cape, and took me away just in time." The 7-year-old Haas found shelter with a Catholic family in the Dutch countryside as the German Gestapo began rounding up members of his family and other Jews in the Netherlands, he said this week in a Munich, Germany, courtroom.
NATIONAL
May 2, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
A federal appeals court opened the way again for the Justice Department to deport alleged Nazi camp guard John Demjanjuk to Germany to face 29,000 counts of accessory to murder. The 6th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Cincinnati denied a stay of deportation for the 89-year-old retired autoworker from his suburban Cleveland home. An arrest warrant in Munich alleges Demjanjuk was a guard in Nazi-occupied Poland in 1943. Demjanjuk says he was a prisoner of war.
NATIONAL
April 7, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
A U.S. immigration judge revoked John Demjanjuk's stay of deportation, clearing the way for him to be returned to Germany nearly three decades after officials first alleged he was a guard at a Nazi death camp. Demjanjuk, 89, who lives near Cleveland, is accused in a German arrest warrant of 29,000 counts of acting as an accessory to murder at the Sobibor camp in Nazi-occupied Poland in 1943. He has denied involvement in any deaths. His son, John Demjanjuk Jr., says an appeal will be filed in Falls Church, Va., at the Board of Immigration Appeals.
WORLD
March 12, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
Retired Ohio autoworker John Demjanjuk has been charged with more than 29,000 counts of accessory to murder for his time as a guard at the Nazis' Sobibor death camp. Prosecutors say they will seek his extradition from the U.S. Demjanjuk is accused of participating in the killings in 1943 while he was a guard at the Nazi camp in occupied Poland. The 88-year-old, who lives in a Cleveland suburb, denies involvement. His son, John Demjanjuk Jr., said his father suffers from a blood disorder and acute kidney failure and is not well enough for international travel.
NATIONAL
December 29, 2005 | From Associated Press
An immigration judge Wednesday ordered John Demjanjuk, a retired autoworker accused of being a Nazi concentration camp guard, deported to his native Ukraine. Demjanjuk, 85, has been fighting to stay in the country since the 1970s. He was suspected for a time of being the notoriously brutal guard known as Ivan the Terrible and was almost executed in Israel. Chief U.S.
NATIONAL
April 11, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
An immigration appeals board ruled that John Demjanjuk, 89, can be deported to Germany to face charges that he served as a Nazi death camp guard during World War II. Demjanjuk's son, John Demjanjuk Jr., said the family would appeal to the 6th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals.
NEWS
March 11, 1988
A lawyer for alleged Nazi war criminal John Demjanjuk said he has asked an Israeli court to reopen his client's trial before it reaches a verdict in order to consider newly discovered evidence. Yoram Sheftel said the evidence, from the U.S. Justice Department, shows that several survivors of the Treblinka death camp had failed to identify Demjanjuk as the brutal guard "Ivan the Terrible."
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