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John Deutch

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NEWS
February 5, 2000 | The Washington Post
Former CIA Director John M. Deutch still has a Pentagon security clearance that allows him to work on classified defense contracts, despite having violated security rules by keeping government secrets on home computers connected to the Internet. The clearance permits Deutch to serve as a paid consultant on Defense Department contracts with Raytheon Corp., SAIC Corp. and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Deutch is a professor at MIT. George J.
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NEWS
September 19, 2000 | From Associated Press
The Pentagon was alerted in the summer of 1998 that former CIA Director John M. Deutch downloaded defense secrets to unsecured personal computers and was urged to assess the damage. But documents show it waited until last February to begin investigating. Among those who were told that the CIA was recommending a Pentagon damage assessment was Defense Secretary William S. Cohen. Rear Adm.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 14, 1996
CIA Director John Deutch will attend a town hall meeting at Locke High School in Watts on Friday to discuss recent allegations that the agency may have eased the way for Nicaraguan drug dealers to sell crack cocaine in South-Central Los Angeles in the early 1980s. Rep. Juanita Millender-McDonald (D-Carson), who requested Deutch's visit, said she hopes that by bringing the director to Watts "we can begin to address some of the many questions that my constituents want to ask."
NEWS
September 16, 2000 | From the Washington Post
John M. Deutch, who has admitted mishandling classified information while serving as director of the CIA, is now under investigation for similar security violations when he previously held high-level posts in the Defense Department, according to confidential documents and officials familiar with the case.
NEWS
February 8, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
The Pentagon is examining whether to end all security clearances for former CIA director John M. Deutch, Defense Secretary William S. Cohen said. Cohen acknowledged for the first time that Deutch has maintained access to "some top-secret information in terms of a narrow area of technology," even though the CIA revoked his clearances at the agency last summer because he had kept classified documents on a home computer.
OPINION
November 24, 1996
On Nov. 15, I attended the meeting at Locke High School in Watts, where I listened to John Deutch, the head of the CIA, say something about the drugs and guns that were being given to the gang kids (Nov. 16). I was working in South-Central Los Angeles during the 1980s when my students were telling me that the CIA was giving them the guns and drugs. I was using CETA funds during the early 1980s to put gang kids to work and to get women off welfare. There were few gang killings until 1983, when CETA ended and the drugs started to appear.
NEWS
September 28, 1995 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the first major test of his leadership of the nation's spy service, CIA Director John M. Deutch is poised to take disciplinary action against CIA officials involved in the spy agency's controversial activities in Guatemala, intelligence community sources said Wednesday. Deutch plans to tell Congress by Friday who should be punished and how severely they should be reprimanded for their involvement in the CIA's worst scandal since last year's Aldrich H. Ames spy case, sources added.
NEWS
September 19, 2000 | From Associated Press
The Pentagon was alerted in the summer of 1998 that former CIA Director John M. Deutch downloaded defense secrets to unsecured personal computers and was urged to assess the damage. But documents show it waited until last February to begin investigating. Among those who were told that the CIA was recommending a Pentagon damage assessment was Defense Secretary William S. Cohen. Rear Adm.
NEWS
February 23, 2000 | From The Washington Post
Former CIA Director John M. Deutch publicly apologized Tuesday for mishandling top secret information on unsecured home computers, saying he never intended to violate security rules and believes none of the information was compromised. "The director of central intelligence is not above the rules," a contrite Deutch told reporters after testifying behind closed doors for 2 1/2 hours before the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence. "I very much regret my errors." Committee Chairman Sen.
NEWS
February 18, 2000 | From Reuters
The Pentagon said Thursday it was reviewing classified material that former CIA Director John M. Deutch had on a non-secure home computer and will seek to answer the question, "How did this happen?" Neither the CIA nor the Pentagon have any evidence that any of the classified material was obtained by an outsider, but both agencies are conducting separate reviews of what might have been compromised if someone had obtained the secret information. Pentagon spokesman Rear Adm.
NEWS
September 14, 2000 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
While former Los Alamos scientist Wen Ho Lee has pleaded guilty to a felony for unlawfully downloading national defense data, former CIA Director John M. Deutch is still under investigation by the Justice Department for a similar infraction. There are indications, however, that Deutch--if he is accused at all--will face no more than a misdemeanor charge. The Deutch case is notable because Atty. Gen.
NEWS
May 26, 2000 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The CIA has disciplined six current and former senior agency officials for mishandling an in-house investigation into the potential compromise of highly classified information by former CIA Director John M. Deutch. The CIA announced Thursday that Air Force Gen. John A. Gordon, the agency's deputy director, had issued written and oral reprimands and admonishments to the six this week as a result of a highly critical classified report by the president's foreign intelligence advisory board.
NEWS
May 7, 2000 | TABASSUM ZAKARIA, REUTERS
A presidential advisory panel has harshly criticized the CIA's internal investigation of its former director, John M. Deutch, who is accused of mishandling top-secret material by storing it on his unsecured home computers, officials said Saturday. The President's Foreign Intelligence Advisory Board reviewed the actions taken by CIA officials investigating the case and reported its findings last week to President Clinton, the Senate Intelligence Committee and the CIA, the officials said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 29, 2000 | ROBERT SCHEER, Robert Scheer is a contributing editor to The Times
It's not easy being Janet Reno. You try to run the Justice Department with some appearance of judicial consistency, but politics keeps getting in the way. I mean, how are you going to justify jailing scientist Wen Ho Lee and throwing away the key because he may have mishandled some secret files when the guy who once headed the CIA did much worse stuff and he's running around the world scot-free?
NEWS
February 25, 2000 | BOB DROGIN and ERIC LICHTBLAU, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Justice Department is reexamining whether former CIA Director John M. Deutch violated the law when he used unsecured computers to create and store top-secret files on everything from covert operations to spy satellites in 1995 and 1996, officials said Thursday.
NEWS
February 23, 2000 | From The Washington Post
Former CIA Director John M. Deutch publicly apologized Tuesday for mishandling top secret information on unsecured home computers, saying he never intended to violate security rules and believes none of the information was compromised. "The director of central intelligence is not above the rules," a contrite Deutch told reporters after testifying behind closed doors for 2 1/2 hours before the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence. "I very much regret my errors." Committee Chairman Sen.
NEWS
March 12, 1995 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With the nomination of John M. Deutch, the CIA is about to get, by accident, just what it has wanted for the past two years--a forceful and well-connected director who can represent its interests at high levels of the Clinton Administration just when the long-term future of the intelligence community is being decided. Since President Clinton took office, the CIA has become increasingly marginalized at the top levels of decision-making. Clinton's first CIA director, R.
NEWS
February 20, 2000 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One sits in jail, facing a possible life sentence if he is convicted in federal court of mishandling classified information by copying nuclear weapon secrets onto portable computer tapes and an unprotected office computer connected to the Internet. The other sits in Boston, facing only the court of public opinion for mishandling classified information by storing intelligence secrets on unprotected home computers used to surf Internet Web sites and to send and receive e-mail.
NEWS
February 20, 2000 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One sits in jail, facing a possible life sentence if he is convicted in federal court of mishandling classified information by copying nuclear weapon secrets onto portable computer tapes and an unprotected office computer connected to the Internet. The other sits in Boston, facing only the court of public opinion for mishandling classified information by storing intelligence secrets on unprotected home computers used to surf Internet Web sites and to send and receive e-mail.
NEWS
February 18, 2000 | From Reuters
The Pentagon said Thursday it was reviewing classified material that former CIA Director John M. Deutch had on a non-secure home computer and will seek to answer the question, "How did this happen?" Neither the CIA nor the Pentagon have any evidence that any of the classified material was obtained by an outsider, but both agencies are conducting separate reviews of what might have been compromised if someone had obtained the secret information. Pentagon spokesman Rear Adm.
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