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John Dillinger

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NEWS
April 4, 1994 | LAURA A. GALLOWAY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Doors often go unlocked in this peaceful hamlet--the kind of place where police officers are more likely chatting with townspeople than arresting dangerous criminals. It's an unlikely place to honor one of America's most notorious gangsters. But here, tucked among the arts-and-crafts shops, stands the John Dillinger Historical Wax Museum. It is one of the most incongruous things in Nashville, along with the old log cabin jail and a stuffed animal known as the "two-headed calf of Brown County."
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 22, 2012 | By Bob Drogin, Los Angeles Times
Each week, the FBI sends reporters an email of "top ten news stories" that it hopes will hit the headlines. The press releases usually highlight crooks nabbed, terrorism plots foiled and convictions notched up by the straight-shooting, gang-busting agents from the world's most famous law enforcement agency. It's doubtful any of the cases the FBI likes to publicize made it into Tim Weiner's absorbing "Enemies: A History of the FBI. " It is a scathing indictment of the FBI as a secret intelligence service that has bent and broken the law for decades in the pursuit of Communists, terrorists and spies.
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NATIONAL
November 8, 2007 | P.J. Huffstutter and Times Staff Writer
When it comes to protecting the memory of his great-uncle, Jeffrey Scalf sees himself as a lone sentinel. Admittedly, it's not easy to defend the name of John H. Dillinger, a man once referred to as Public Enemy No. 1. "For good or ill, this is my family's legacy and no one is going to take that away from me," says Scalf, 50, who readily admits his childhood fascination with the infamous outlaw has become a crusade.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 18, 2011
Gangster John Dillinger was shot down by G-Man Melvin Purvis outside of Chicago's Biograph Theater on July 22, 1934, after watching a movie — naturally, it was a gangster flick, "Manhattan Melodrama. " MGM was quick to capitalize on the Dillinger connection to publicize the film. But "Manhattan Melodrama" caught audiences' and critics' attention even before Dillinger was gunned down. Clark Gable and William Powell play lifelong friends on opposite sides of the law. Available on DVD, "Manhattan Melodrama" is fast-paced summer entertainment.
TRAVEL
June 28, 2009 | Jay Jones
It must have been hard for most folks (with the exception of FBI agents) not to take a shine to the gentlemanly John Dillinger. His chosen career was one that -- during the Great Depression -- seemed almost noble: He robbed banks. "We don't want your money, mister, just the banks'," he is said to have told a terrified customer during one stickup. While fleeing from another heist, he stopped the getaway car to drop off one of his hostages outside her home.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 2009
Kudos to Bryan Burrough for an excellent essay reviewing the cinematic portrayals of gangsters, particularly John Dillinger and Baby Face Nelson ["A Straight-Shooting Flick," June 28]. I was surprised, however, that he missed a key movie: Mickey Rooney's tough-guy portrayal in "Baby Face Nelson" (1957). Leo Gordon played John Dillinger, in a minor role. Rooney's character would bark at his wife, "Sue, hand me the chopper!" (machine gun). Strangely, Nelson's wife was named Helen. Rooney, in his 30s, was about 10 years older than Nelson was during his crime spree.
SPORTS
September 22, 1990
Al Davis has just completed a great grand slam in sports--Oakland, Irwindale, Sacramento, Oakland and Los Angeles. In the process, he made some of the officials of those cities look like fools, although perhaps they didn't have that far to go. Davis is very good at what he does. But so was John Dillinger. WILLIAM WELLS Malibu
NEWS
July 20, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Copies of a death mask of bank robber John Dillinger, who was killed by FBI agents on a Chicago street 57 years ago, will soon be sold at auction, said Harold Rubin, the owner of the mask. Dillinger, 31, who was public enemy No. 1 at the time of his death, managed only to draw his pistol as the federal agents closed in outside the Biograph Theater on July 22, 1934. The latex death mask shows that the fatal bullet passed under his right eye, Rubin said.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 5, 1991 | IRV LETOFSKY
The sound is nice and the lighting is swell on "Dillinger," which airs Sunday at 9 p.m. on ABC. But that's about as pleasant as you can be about this new rerunning of legend, circa 1933-34, of the raucous bank robber John Dillinger. There's a lot of bluster and blazing tommy guns from the David Wolper group, but that doesn't obscure bad casting. Whoever put in Mark Harmon as John Dillinger and Will Patton as fevered G-man Melvin Purvis ought to be forced to watch the show.
OPINION
January 22, 1989
The biggest bank heist in the history of the country is now coming to light. The robber is the savings and loan industry and the victim is the U.S. Treasury and ultimately the taxpayers. These bold bandits would make John Dillinger or Pretty Boy Floyd look like pikers, one main difference being that Floyd and Dillinger used guns while the so-called "respected" savings industry used briefcases through criminal acts and stupidity to loot our Treasury of an estimated $100 billion while the regulatory agencies apparently looked the other way until it came to light that this could be the scandal of the century.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 2010 | By Dennis Lim
Marco Ferreri, who died in 1997, was something of an odd man out among the Italian auteurs who made a global impression during the golden age of art cinema. Despite his attention-getting knack for provocation, he never quite crossed over to American audiences, and his reputation has fallen into eclipse over the years. Ferreri had a lot in common with his more popular countrymen. Like Federico Fellini, he had a penchant for the absurd. Like Pier Paolo Pasolini, he reveled in transgression.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 9, 2009 | By Dennis Lim
It takes a lot to jolt a 21st century moviegoer into a new way of seeing -- which is reason enough to applaud Michael Mann's strange, imperfect "Public Enemies," a period piece disorientingly told in the cinematic present tense. Mann's account of the brief, blazing career of the Depression-era bank robber and folk hero John Dillinger draws on a doorstop of a book (of the same title) by Bryan Burrough about two early-'30s developments: the celebrity-outlaw crime wave (led by Dillinger, Bonnie and Clyde, Baby Face Nelson and others)
ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 2009
Kudos to Bryan Burrough for an excellent essay reviewing the cinematic portrayals of gangsters, particularly John Dillinger and Baby Face Nelson ["A Straight-Shooting Flick," June 28]. I was surprised, however, that he missed a key movie: Mickey Rooney's tough-guy portrayal in "Baby Face Nelson" (1957). Leo Gordon played John Dillinger, in a minor role. Rooney's character would bark at his wife, "Sue, hand me the chopper!" (machine gun). Strangely, Nelson's wife was named Helen. Rooney, in his 30s, was about 10 years older than Nelson was during his crime spree.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 6, 2009 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN
When I spent an afternoon talking with Michael Mann about "Public Enemies" last month, I asked him, half-jokingly, if he had a technical advisor that helped him with the details of John Dillinger's bank robberies. Mann is a famously intense stickler for detail. When he shot "Ali," for example, he filmed the scenes of the young champion at home at the boxer's actual house in Miami.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 28, 2009 | Rachel Abramowitz
Johnny Depp has fond memories of his first machine gun. He was just a bitty kid growing up in Owensboro, Ky., but somewhere around age 5 or 6, he began shooting .22s, then moved on to .38s, .44s and .45s. And then he got his hands on a relative's Thompson machine gun. "I butted it up against the tree 'cause it tends to ride up on you," says the 46-year-old actor, who relives the moment, complete with shooting sounds. He begins clapping his hand on the top of his imaginary gun.
TRAVEL
June 28, 2009 | Jay Jones
It must have been hard for most folks (with the exception of FBI agents) not to take a shine to the gentlemanly John Dillinger. His chosen career was one that -- during the Great Depression -- seemed almost noble: He robbed banks. "We don't want your money, mister, just the banks'," he is said to have told a terrified customer during one stickup. While fleeing from another heist, he stopped the getaway car to drop off one of his hostages outside her home.
NEWS
June 22, 1989 | From Associated Press
About 80 veterans hissed as a Navy retiree was found guilty of violating a noise law by flying the flag on windy days. "If it's criminal to fly the flag, then I'm John Dillinger," said Lee Bach, the World War II Naval veteran convicted Tuesday. Gena Contreras, a neighbor bothered by the snapping and popping of the 3-by-5-foot banner atop Bach's 40-foot flagpole, filed the public nuisance case after he rejected her request that he not fly the flag while she was home. The offense carries a penalty of up to 90 days in jail and a $300 fine.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 11, 1992
I read the article on UC Irvine professor and poet Robert Peters in today's Calendar section ("Poet's Work Probes Mind of Serial Killer Randy Kraft," Jan. 6) and I see that he is still disgusting people and provoking misery with his "poetry." I am an ex-student of Robert Peters' (and) was tortured through a quarter of Peters' "works of art," which center on such characters as a murderess ("The Blood Countess"), a criminal (John Dillinger) and a lunatic dictator (Ludwig of Bavaria)
ENTERTAINMENT
June 28, 2009 | Bryan Burrough, Burrough, a special correspondent at Vanity Fair, is author of "Public Enemies: America's Greatest Crime Wave and the Birth of the FBI, 1933-34."
Hollywood makes myths and always has, and I guess that's as it should be. Moviegoers want to be entertained, after all, so moviemakers have long burnished history to make it more entertaining. From "Birth of a Nation" all the way up to "Mississippi Burning," "The Untouchables" and the little-remembered CIA-in-Laos film "Air America," the facts of American history have marched off to battle with Hollywood myth and, sadly, at least for me, lost almost every time.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 16, 2009 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN
Hollywood is full of filmmakers who are uncompromising perfectionists, but only Michael Mann could boast that he not only has a favorite room to screen his films -- the Zanuck theater on the Fox lot -- but also a favorite row in the theater where he thinks you should park your fanny for the optimal viewing experience.
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