Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJohn Divola
IN THE NEWS

John Divola

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 2013 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times Art Critic
In this time when news is disseminated ever more quickly, we asked our critics to list the best of culture in 2013 in tweet form: In chronological order, 2013 Top 10: Art American artist Charles Reiffel is probably the best early Modernist painter you've never heard of - til now http://lat.ms/1f4OtFO #Top10art Brilliant, sexy charioteer was only one great reason to see Getty's extraordinary ancient "Sicily" show http://lat.ms/1aSscqo ...
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 2013 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times Art Critic
In this time when news is disseminated ever more quickly, we asked our critics to list the best of culture in 2013 in tweet form: In chronological order, 2013 Top 10: Art American artist Charles Reiffel is probably the best early Modernist painter you've never heard of - til now http://lat.ms/1f4OtFO #Top10art Brilliant, sexy charioteer was only one great reason to see Getty's extraordinary ancient "Sicily" show http://lat.ms/1aSscqo ...
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 2013 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times Art Critic
Are photographers vandals? Does the mere presence of a camera at an ordinary place or extraordinary event inevitably damage the experience of it, as vandalism does? Is photography a powerful creative tool for the willful destruction of established art, all in the service of making new possibilities and unexpected ways of seeing? These questions, provocative and surprising, began to be posed in 1974 by artist John Divola, then 25 and just out of school. Born and raised in the San Fernando Valley, an area whose wholesale transformation from rural to suburban shifted into overdrive after World War II, during his youth, Divola studied first at Cal State Northridge and then UCLA.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 2013 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times Art Critic
Are photographers vandals? Does the mere presence of a camera at an ordinary place or extraordinary event inevitably damage the experience of it, as vandalism does? Is photography a powerful creative tool for the willful destruction of established art, all in the service of making new possibilities and unexpected ways of seeing? These questions, provocative and surprising, began to be posed in 1974 by artist John Divola, then 25 and just out of school. Born and raised in the San Fernando Valley, an area whose wholesale transformation from rural to suburban shifted into overdrive after World War II, during his youth, Divola studied first at Cal State Northridge and then UCLA.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 1995 | SUSAN KANDEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In "WX6276, V8102, KU100382, X14149, X13194, X10117, V8161, WX6230: Seven Song Birds and a Rabbit" at Jan Kesner Gallery, photographer John Divola plunders an archive of stereographic negatives housed at the California Museum of Photography, in order to offer a critique of the institutional structures of knowledge. This tactic, however, is rather embarrassingly after the fact.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 1990 | CATHY CURTIS
We all have mental pictures of natural events large and small: cyclones, phases of the moon, lightning, the simple act of dropping a rock into a pond. In his recent work, John Divola meditates on the distance between these frozen, simplified images and the nuanced complexity of real-life events. He constructs engagingly raffish mock-ups of natural scenes with wildly painted papier-mache and photographs them in black-and-white with a large-format Polaroid camera.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 1986 | KRISTINE MCKENNA
In an exhibition of Cibachrome photographs, titled "Environments/Anti-Environments," Tim Close attempts to illuminate the expressive potential of raw materials found at construction sites. As in similar work by John Divola, Close leaves his artist's thumbprint squarely in the center of these self-consciously composed tableaux, which he orchestrates on weekends at temporarily deserted locales.
NEWS
February 13, 2013 | By Booth Moore
It was a collection of future classics. Spare shapes but decorated and ladylike. Soft in form, texture and color but created using cutting edge techniques. The kind of clothes that delight and surprise. Jack McCollough and Lazaro Hernandez proved why they are on top of American fashion's creative pyramid Wednesday night, when they showed their incredible fall 2013 collection in New York City's Financial District. The venue was the historic, Gilded Age 5 Beekman Street building, abandoned and decaying for years, and now on the road to redevelopment.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 2, 2012 | By Holly Myers
  In the tide of group shows that has inundated the art world this summer - as it does every summer -   “No Person May Carry a Fish Into a Bar,” at Blum & Poe, stands out not only for its fantastic title but for having been conceived with the sort of great idea that seems obvious only after someone else has thought of it. Curated by artist Julian Hoeber and filmmaker and television writer Alix Lambert, the show explores the nature of...
ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 1985 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC
"You spend all this time making images, and what goes out? A picture of you standing in front of the image. What does that mean?" John Divola is submitting good naturedly to a photo session and interview while expressing the usual photographer's discomfort with being on the wrong side of the lens. Meanwhile, 61 of his photographs are doing exactly as he wishes--standing alone as images, in a show that highlights 10 years of his work, at the Municipal Art Gallery through May 19.
NEWS
February 13, 2013 | By Booth Moore
It was a collection of future classics. Spare shapes but decorated and ladylike. Soft in form, texture and color but created using cutting edge techniques. The kind of clothes that delight and surprise. Jack McCollough and Lazaro Hernandez proved why they are on top of American fashion's creative pyramid Wednesday night, when they showed their incredible fall 2013 collection in New York City's Financial District. The venue was the historic, Gilded Age 5 Beekman Street building, abandoned and decaying for years, and now on the road to redevelopment.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 2, 2012 | By Holly Myers
  In the tide of group shows that has inundated the art world this summer - as it does every summer -   “No Person May Carry a Fish Into a Bar,” at Blum & Poe, stands out not only for its fantastic title but for having been conceived with the sort of great idea that seems obvious only after someone else has thought of it. Curated by artist Julian Hoeber and filmmaker and television writer Alix Lambert, the show explores the nature of...
ENTERTAINMENT
July 26, 1998 | Hunter Drohojowska-Philp, Hunter Drohojowska-Philp is a frequent contributor to Calendar
In photograph after photograph, the desolate desert horizon is illuminated by incomparable pink and celestial blue light and dotted with small, cubic houses. For the past three years, artist John Divola has been devoting his weekends to driving around the east end of the Marongo Valley Basin, Wonder Valley and the area around Twentynine Palms to document unassuming buildings set against the grandeur of nature.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 1995 | SUSAN KANDEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In "WX6276, V8102, KU100382, X14149, X13194, X10117, V8161, WX6230: Seven Song Birds and a Rabbit" at Jan Kesner Gallery, photographer John Divola plunders an archive of stereographic negatives housed at the California Museum of Photography, in order to offer a critique of the institutional structures of knowledge. This tactic, however, is rather embarrassingly after the fact.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 1990 | CATHY CURTIS
We all have mental pictures of natural events large and small: cyclones, phases of the moon, lightning, the simple act of dropping a rock into a pond. In his recent work, John Divola meditates on the distance between these frozen, simplified images and the nuanced complexity of real-life events. He constructs engagingly raffish mock-ups of natural scenes with wildly painted papier-mache and photographs them in black-and-white with a large-format Polaroid camera.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 1986 | KRISTINE MCKENNA
In an exhibition of Cibachrome photographs, titled "Environments/Anti-Environments," Tim Close attempts to illuminate the expressive potential of raw materials found at construction sites. As in similar work by John Divola, Close leaves his artist's thumbprint squarely in the center of these self-consciously composed tableaux, which he orchestrates on weekends at temporarily deserted locales.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 26, 1998 | Hunter Drohojowska-Philp, Hunter Drohojowska-Philp is a frequent contributor to Calendar
In photograph after photograph, the desolate desert horizon is illuminated by incomparable pink and celestial blue light and dotted with small, cubic houses. For the past three years, artist John Divola has been devoting his weekends to driving around the east end of the Marongo Valley Basin, Wonder Valley and the area around Twentynine Palms to document unassuming buildings set against the grandeur of nature.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 23, 2011
In the postwar years, there was a shift away from the picaresque and the anecdotal in Southern California photography to a more conceptual and experiential mode, one that took into account artistic processes and that was anchored firmly to the image maker's conveyance of choice in navigating the midcentury landscape: the car. The exhibition "Street Sight" tracks this shift with works from the late 1960s to the early 1980s, including those by...
ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 1985 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC
"You spend all this time making images, and what goes out? A picture of you standing in front of the image. What does that mean?" John Divola is submitting good naturedly to a photo session and interview while expressing the usual photographer's discomfort with being on the wrong side of the lens. Meanwhile, 61 of his photographs are doing exactly as he wishes--standing alone as images, in a show that highlights 10 years of his work, at the Municipal Art Gallery through May 19.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|