Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJohn Dominic Crossan
IN THE NEWS

John Dominic Crossan

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 13, 2010 | By Mitchell Landsberg, Los Angeles Times
"Our father ?" Most Christians can fill in the words that follow: " ? who art in heaven, hallowed be thy name, thy kingdom come, thy will be done ?" But wait ? let's rewind. John Dominic Crossan , a renowned, if controversial, scholar of Christianity, says the essence of the Lord's Prayer can be found in those first two words, in fact, in the single word "father," which, he believes, encapsulates an entire 1st century worldview lost to modern churchgoers. "After that," he says, "everything would follow.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 13, 2010 | By Mitchell Landsberg, Los Angeles Times
"Our father ?" Most Christians can fill in the words that follow: " ? who art in heaven, hallowed be thy name, thy kingdom come, thy will be done ?" But wait ? let's rewind. John Dominic Crossan , a renowned, if controversial, scholar of Christianity, says the essence of the Lord's Prayer can be found in those first two words, in fact, in the single word "father," which, he believes, encapsulates an entire 1st century worldview lost to modern churchgoers. "After that," he says, "everything would follow.
Advertisement
BOOKS
April 3, 1988 | John Dart, Dart, who covers religion news for The Times, is author of "The Jesus of Heresy and History," to be published late this year
It may be easier for a camel to pass through the eye of a needle than for the average churchgoer to enter into the realm of historical-literary biblical studies. The territory is quite unfamiliar. Important critical research findings seem to stop short of the church doors--in a society that otherwise prides itself on ready access to information. But even the person in the pew aware of the scholarly pursuit of the historical Jesus might regard the first three authors above as preposterous revisionists: Jane Schaberg says that the Nativity accounts in Matthew and Luke really tried to explain away a tradition about the illegitimate birth of Jesus and did not intend to describe a miraculous virginal conception, despite the unanimous understanding of the latter by the early churches.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 2006 | John D. Spalding, Special to The Times
UNTOLD millions know the story of Holy Week -- from Jesus' arrival in Jerusalem on Palm Sunday to his resurrection on Easter. And yet, since the dawn of Christianity, people have disagreed about the events of Jesus' last days and what they mean. Even the gospels vary in details and emphases. And as two new books demonstrate, how believers understand that story matters greatly to their faith. In "The Last Week," biblical scholars Marcus J.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 15, 1986 | JOHN DART, Times Religion Writer
The historical Jesus no doubt told the parables of the good Samaritan, the prodigal son, the lost sheep and the mustard seed, according to a panel of New Testament scholars, but the group also says he may have told a chilling story about an assassin's preparations. Of 27 parables found in the Bible, 21 were favored by the majority of scholars voting in a recent session of the Jesus Seminar, an unprecedented project assessing the authenticity of about 500 sayings attributed to Jesus.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 5, 2000 | JONATHAN KIRSCH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"This is what I have learned between Ireland and America, monastery and university, priesthood and marriage," writes John Dominic Crossan at a characteristically confessional moment in his memoir, "A Long Way From Tipperary." "I have learned that God is more radical than we can ever imagine, that a divine utopia on this Earth is more subversive than we can ever accept, and that Pilate acted for all of us when he executed Jesus."
ENTERTAINMENT
December 24, 2004 | John D. Spalding, Special to The Times
MENTION the term "son of God" and many people today think immediately of Jesus. But if it had been uttered anywhere in the Roman Empire at the time of Jesus, most would have thought of Augustus Caesar -- divi filius, divine son of the deified Julius Caesar. Augustus had conquered the world and established the Pax Romana that would last some 200 years. He was revered as Lord, Redeemer and Savior of the World.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 2006 | John D. Spalding, Special to The Times
UNTOLD millions know the story of Holy Week -- from Jesus' arrival in Jerusalem on Palm Sunday to his resurrection on Easter. And yet, since the dawn of Christianity, people have disagreed about the events of Jesus' last days and what they mean. Even the gospels vary in details and emphases. And as two new books demonstrate, how believers understand that story matters greatly to their faith. In "The Last Week," biblical scholars Marcus J.
BOOKS
September 6, 1998 | ROBERT L. WILKEN, Robert L. Wilken is the William R. Kenan Jr. professor of the history of Christianity at the University of Virginia. His most recent book is "Remembering the Christian Past" (William B. Eerdmans Publishing Co.)
The story of how Christianity came into being, how the religion that began with Jesus in Palestine made its way across the Mediterranean, spread north, crossed the Alps and began to create a Christian society out of the barbarian tribes that inhabited what is now Western and Eastern Central Europe has been told again and again.
NEWS
April 5, 1998 | MARY ROURKE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rare as it is for Passover and Easter to occur on same weekend, as they do this year, starting Friday, it is more unusual that the Jewish and Christian holy days coincide with publication of a book that emphasizes the close connection between the two faiths when Christianity was new. "The Birth of Christianity" (Harper San Francisco) is historian John Dominic Crossan's reconstruction of what life was like for Jesus and his earliest followers in 1st century Israel.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 24, 2004 | John D. Spalding, Special to The Times
MENTION the term "son of God" and many people today think immediately of Jesus. But if it had been uttered anywhere in the Roman Empire at the time of Jesus, most would have thought of Augustus Caesar -- divi filius, divine son of the deified Julius Caesar. Augustus had conquered the world and established the Pax Romana that would last some 200 years. He was revered as Lord, Redeemer and Savior of the World.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 5, 2000 | JONATHAN KIRSCH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"This is what I have learned between Ireland and America, monastery and university, priesthood and marriage," writes John Dominic Crossan at a characteristically confessional moment in his memoir, "A Long Way From Tipperary." "I have learned that God is more radical than we can ever imagine, that a divine utopia on this Earth is more subversive than we can ever accept, and that Pilate acted for all of us when he executed Jesus."
BOOKS
September 6, 1998 | ROBERT L. WILKEN, Robert L. Wilken is the William R. Kenan Jr. professor of the history of Christianity at the University of Virginia. His most recent book is "Remembering the Christian Past" (William B. Eerdmans Publishing Co.)
The story of how Christianity came into being, how the religion that began with Jesus in Palestine made its way across the Mediterranean, spread north, crossed the Alps and began to create a Christian society out of the barbarian tribes that inhabited what is now Western and Eastern Central Europe has been told again and again.
BOOKS
April 3, 1988 | John Dart, Dart, who covers religion news for The Times, is author of "The Jesus of Heresy and History," to be published late this year
It may be easier for a camel to pass through the eye of a needle than for the average churchgoer to enter into the realm of historical-literary biblical studies. The territory is quite unfamiliar. Important critical research findings seem to stop short of the church doors--in a society that otherwise prides itself on ready access to information. But even the person in the pew aware of the scholarly pursuit of the historical Jesus might regard the first three authors above as preposterous revisionists: Jane Schaberg says that the Nativity accounts in Matthew and Luke really tried to explain away a tradition about the illegitimate birth of Jesus and did not intend to describe a miraculous virginal conception, despite the unanimous understanding of the latter by the early churches.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 15, 1986 | JOHN DART, Times Religion Writer
The historical Jesus no doubt told the parables of the good Samaritan, the prodigal son, the lost sheep and the mustard seed, according to a panel of New Testament scholars, but the group also says he may have told a chilling story about an assassin's preparations. Of 27 parables found in the Bible, 21 were favored by the majority of scholars voting in a recent session of the Jesus Seminar, an unprecedented project assessing the authenticity of about 500 sayings attributed to Jesus.
NEWS
February 24, 1994 | MARY ROURKE
Who was Jesus? Albert Schweitzer was among the first this century to ask that question in print, publishing "The Quest of the Historical Jesus" in 1906. Lately, others have explored the subject. Some make their claims with a scientist's caution. Others go for shock value. * Scholarly books for non-scholars: * John Dominic Crossan's "Jesus: A Revolutionary Biography" (HarperSanFrancisco) casts him as a political agitator who never claimed to be divine.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 16, 1999
Some broadcast and cable programs contain material included in the public school curriculum and on standardized examinations. Here are home-viewing tips: * Today--"48 Hours: Too Much Too Fast" (KCBS 10-11 p.m.) The title of this documentary is deceptive, suggesting "kids in trouble." But it's actually about positive role models--kids overcoming troubles, such as homelessness.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|