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NEWS
December 8, 1995 | AMY WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John Douglas made a career of tracking killers. For 25 years he hunted the nation's most cruel and sadistic criminals--men who murdered, raped and tortured, again and again, for fun. As the head of the FBI's serial crime unit, Douglas helped catch San Francisco's "trailside killer," who stalked and shot hikers in the late 1970s and early '80s. Douglas aided Atlanta investigators in arresting Wayne Williams, who was convicted of a string of child murders.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 2013 | By Mike Boehm, Los Angeles Times
Among the pleasures of seeing an August Wilson play, it's often said, is just listening to the people talk. As Los Angeles Times theater critic Charles McNulty has noted, Wilson stocks his scripts with "natural raconteurs" and lets them soar in "verbal arias" full of earthy poetry. In that sense, a recent dinner break interview with Keith David, John Douglas Thompson and Glynn Turman was more or less an extension of what they'd been doing in rehearsals for the Mark Taper Forum's revival of "Joe Turner's Come and Gone.
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NEWS
October 29, 1995 | RICHARD COLE, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Unabomber probably drives an older car but keeps it in good condition. He may have a wife or girlfriend, but she knows there's a certain part of the house--a basement, a special room--that's off limits. In the same way other people might talk baseball, he likes to discuss the bombings--how stupid the FBI is, how smart the bomber is. He probably visited the scene of his early bombings, talked to police, asked questions, maybe even offered advice. He may have taken a trip this summer.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 11, 2011 | By Dennis Lim, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Before he made it, the great radical filmmaker Robert Kramer described "Milestones," the 1975 epic of post-counterculture America that he co-directed with John Douglas, as "the last film. " "Everything has to be in it," Kramer said. "All the play of the heart. All the fullness of feeling. " True to his promise, "Milestones," newly available on DVD through Icarus Films, contains multitudes. In a film that stretches and sprawls and often seems to overflow its bounds, dozens of characters around the country — on communes, in cities, on the road, starting families, finding work, reintegrating into society after time in prison — wrestle with what it means to live in the hangover of their dashed utopian aspirations.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 1988
What a pleasure "Supercarrier" is. Upbeat, superb action, fine young talent and the marvelous Richard Jaeckel surely will make Sunday nights more enjoyable. John Douglas, Encinitas
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 11, 1995
John Douglas Harrop--an actor, author and teacher--died Saturday at his Ventura home. He was 64. Born in Thornbury-on-Tees, England, Harrop pursued several different careers in his life. He served as a second lieutenant in the British Army during the Malaysian conflict and received the British military cross for moral courage of a high order, said his wife, Vicki Harrop.
NEWS
January 27, 1989
John Douglas French, a founder of the UCLA Brain Research Institute whose personal battle with Alzheimer's disease took on public overtones when his wife, diva Dorothy Kirsten, began a lengthy campaign to house the disease's victims, died Wednesday. He was 77 and died at the Alzheimer's care facility in Los Alamitos that bears his name.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 26, 1995 | PHIL SNEIDERMAN and ERIC SLATER and JOHN M. GLIONNA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In a move the government called a warning to disgruntled aerospace workers tempted to peddle U.S. defense secrets, a former Lockheed engineer was indicted Thursday on charges of attempted espionage for allegedly trying to sell secret plans concerning the Sea Shadow, a Navy stealth project. John Douglas Charlton, 62, allegedly tried to sell the plans concerning the ship and other projects to an FBI agent posing as an official of an unnamed Western European government, according to prosecutors.
NEWS
January 6, 1997 | LARRY HARNISCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Light does not easily penetrate the clouded story of Betty Short, a 22-year-old unemployed cashier and waitress whose body was found cut in half and gruesomely mutilated 50 years ago this month in a vacant lot in Southwest Los Angeles. The unsolved killing remains Los Angeles' premier myth noir, a tale of a tragic beauty clad in black, prowling the night life, a cautionary fable that rings as true today as it did in 1947. The legend insists on a shadowed, epic tone.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 18, 1988 | CARLA RIVERA, Times Staff Writer
Mary Fortmann's days and nights of watchfulness and worry are over. They ended in February when Daniel, her husband of 50 years, became one of the first patients to enter the new Los Alamitos-based John Douglas French Center for Alzheimer's Disease.
BOOKS
January 11, 2004 | John Sutherland, John Sutherland is the Lord Northcliffe professor of modern English literature at University College London. He is the author of several books, including "The Life of Walter Scott" and a forthcoming biography of Stephen Spender.
The trials of Oscar Wilde are as famous as anything he wrote. Wilde in the dock -- "big, loose and picturesque," as a contemporary newspaper put it -- has been played on screen by Robert Morley (1959), Peter Finch (1960), Michael Gambon (1986) and Stephen Fry (1998). There are at least a dozen full-length lives, with Richard Ellmann's currently the biography of first call. The image of Wilde's martyrdom at the Old Bailey in 1895 is as familiar as that of St. Sebastian pierced with arrows.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2003 | Carolyn Patricia Scott, Times Staff Writer
The third in the "Hannibal Lecter" movies, "Red Dragon," released April 1 as a two-disc DVD set, includes all the usual suspects: director's commentary, conversations with leads Anthony Hopkins and Edward Norton, storyboards, scene guide, makeup application. But this director's edition of "Dragon" has a bonus -- a mini-documentary on former FBI profiler John Douglas.
NEWS
December 8, 1995 | AMY WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John Douglas made a career of tracking killers. For 25 years he hunted the nation's most cruel and sadistic criminals--men who murdered, raped and tortured, again and again, for fun. As the head of the FBI's serial crime unit, Douglas helped catch San Francisco's "trailside killer," who stalked and shot hikers in the late 1970s and early '80s. Douglas aided Atlanta investigators in arresting Wayne Williams, who was convicted of a string of child murders.
NEWS
October 29, 1995 | RICHARD COLE, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Unabomber probably drives an older car but keeps it in good condition. He may have a wife or girlfriend, but she knows there's a certain part of the house--a basement, a special room--that's off limits. In the same way other people might talk baseball, he likes to discuss the bombings--how stupid the FBI is, how smart the bomber is. He probably visited the scene of his early bombings, talked to police, asked questions, maybe even offered advice. He may have taken a trip this summer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 11, 1995
John Douglas Harrop--an actor, author and teacher--died Saturday at his Ventura home. He was 64. Born in Thornbury-on-Tees, England, Harrop pursued several different careers in his life. He served as a second lieutenant in the British Army during the Malaysian conflict and received the British military cross for moral courage of a high order, said his wife, Vicki Harrop.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 31, 1995 | PHIL SNEIDERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A 62-year-old Lancaster man accused of trying to sell U.S. defense secrets pleaded not guilty in federal court Tuesday to attempted espionage charges. John Douglas Charlton, a retired Lockheed engineer, entered his plea in Los Angeles before U.S. District Judge Harry L. Hupp, who ordered a Nov. 7 trial.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 31, 1995 | PHIL SNEIDERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A 62-year-old Lancaster man accused of trying to sell U.S. defense secrets pleaded not guilty in federal court Tuesday to attempted espionage charges. John Douglas Charlton, a retired Lockheed engineer, entered his plea in Los Angeles before U.S. District Judge Harry L. Hupp, who ordered a Nov. 7 trial.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2003 | Carolyn Patricia Scott, Times Staff Writer
The third in the "Hannibal Lecter" movies, "Red Dragon," released April 1 as a two-disc DVD set, includes all the usual suspects: director's commentary, conversations with leads Anthony Hopkins and Edward Norton, storyboards, scene guide, makeup application. But this director's edition of "Dragon" has a bonus -- a mini-documentary on former FBI profiler John Douglas.
NEWS
January 7, 1994 | MICHAEL DORRIS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
At a quiet moment during a dinner party the other night, a man I didn't know said, with no apparent lead-in, "You know, every male of our generation was profoundly affected by Vietnam. Our individual reactions--to go or not, to deal with our decision--influenced everything that followed in our lives. I try to explain it to my kids, the ongoing centrality of that time to me, and they act as though I'm speaking a different language."
NEWS
January 27, 1989
John Douglas French, a founder of the UCLA Brain Research Institute whose personal battle with Alzheimer's disease took on public overtones when his wife, diva Dorothy Kirsten, began a lengthy campaign to house the disease's victims, died Wednesday. He was 77 and died at the Alzheimer's care facility in Los Alamitos that bears his name.
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