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John Dower

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May 25, 1986 | Harry H. L. Kitano, Kitano's books include "Race Relations," "Japanese Americans" and "American Racism" (with Roger Daniels). and
World War II has meant different things to different people. Terms such as fighting for a noble cause, a mission to propagate the finest cultural values , of a war to combat tyranny and oppression, and a struggle to preserve freedom and democracy reflect one point of view. Others saw the struggle in political-economic terms, while for many of the victims, no matter what side, the war meant death and destruction.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 2010 | Scott Martelle, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Cultures of War Pearl Harbor, Hiroshima, 9-11, Iraq John W. Dower W.W. Norton: 552 pp., $29.95 Just after the turn of the 20th century, with the United States basking in the glow of victory in the Spanish-American War, insurgents in the Philippines decided that they'd rather not have their former Spanish occupiers replaced by American occupiers. So they fought, and they were eradicated by U.S. troops in what turned out to be the first brutal military campaign of history's most violent century.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 24, 1990 | DAVID SMOLLAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The nation's foremost authority on the post-World War II American occupation of Japan and how it shaped contemporary Japanese society is leaving his endowed chair at UC San Diego for the Massachusetts Insitute of Technology. The departure of historian John Dower, the Joseph Naiman Professor of Japanese Studies at UCSD, is "truly a real loss" to the La Jolla campus, literature professor James Lyon, provost at UCSD's Fifth College and a close colleague of Dower, said last week.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 24, 1990 | DAVID SMOLLAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The nation's foremost authority on the post-World War II American occupation of Japan and how it shaped contemporary Japanese society is leaving his endowed chair at UC San Diego for the Massachusetts Insitute of Technology. The departure of historian John Dower, the Joseph Naiman Professor of Japanese Studies at UCSD, is "truly a real loss" to the La Jolla campus, literature professor James Lyon, provost at UCSD's Fifth College and a close colleague of Dower, said last week.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 2010 | Scott Martelle, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Cultures of War Pearl Harbor, Hiroshima, 9-11, Iraq John W. Dower W.W. Norton: 552 pp., $29.95 Just after the turn of the 20th century, with the United States basking in the glow of victory in the Spanish-American War, insurgents in the Philippines decided that they'd rather not have their former Spanish occupiers replaced by American occupiers. So they fought, and they were eradicated by U.S. troops in what turned out to be the first brutal military campaign of history's most violent century.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 14, 2006 | Kevin Crust, Times Staff Writer
It's not Zidane-head-butt-to-the-chest invigorating, but the documentary "Once in a Lifetime: The Extraordinary Story of the New York Cosmos" does provide an exuberant look at a heady moment in America's soccer past that is well worth remembering. However, beginning with its hyperbolic title, the film would seem to overstate the lingering importance of the team's bright lights and big-city implosion and suffers from a certain amount of sloppiness in its execution.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 2000
One of the most carefully nurtured myths of the post-World War II era is that Japan's Emperor Hirohito was little more than a figurehead, a passive front man, for the militarists who waged aggression across Asia in the 1930s and '40s. In fact, as historians long ago began to discover, Hirohito was closely involved in the war that was fought in his name and that ended only when he reluctantly decided in August 1945 to accept Allied terms for Japan's surrender.
NEWS
April 17, 2001 | DIANE HAITHMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The 2001 Pulitzer Prizes in the letters, drama and music categories had one winner joking about an unlikely trifecta. Composer John Corigliano, who Monday was named as the Pulitzer music winner for his Symphony No. 2 for String Orchestra, last year took home an Oscar for best original score for the feature film "The Red Violin." Reached by phone Monday at his home in Manhattan, Corigliano, 63, joked that for next year, he has his eye on the Nobel Prize.
OPINION
December 10, 2003
"Bush Taps Baker for Iraq Task" (Dec. 6), about former secretary of State James A. Baker III and the attempt to thrash out the Iraqi debt muddle, avoided an agonizing question. Isn't a world society in which a bloody tyrant can be showered with such enormous sums of money utterly intolerable? Most people have never murdered, robbed, raped, tortured or enslaved anybody, and they have trouble getting a car loan. Saddam Hussein and his henchmen committed these crimes many thousands of times over for three decades and they were bankrolled by the international community to the tune of hundreds of billions of dollars.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 23, 1989 | DAVID SMOLLAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
By heading seminars on U.S. history and culture for Chinese scholars and graduate students in Nanjing earlier this month, eight UC San Diego academics say, they sent a strong signal of encouragement to those Chinese who support continued ties to America at a time of strained Sino-American relations. The professors both lectured and brainstormed informally with 37 Chinese specialists on U.S.
BOOKS
May 25, 1986 | Harry H. L. Kitano, Kitano's books include "Race Relations," "Japanese Americans" and "American Racism" (with Roger Daniels). and
World War II has meant different things to different people. Terms such as fighting for a noble cause, a mission to propagate the finest cultural values , of a war to combat tyranny and oppression, and a struggle to preserve freedom and democracy reflect one point of view. Others saw the struggle in political-economic terms, while for many of the victims, no matter what side, the war meant death and destruction.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 24, 1988 | SHEILA BENSON, Times Film Critic
Academy Award-nominated documentary films have had one-day programs in the past, but this year marks an unprecedented departure. Beginning Friday at the AMC Century 14 Theaters, there will be a weeklong run of all the 1987 nominees--the five in the feature-length documentary category (reviewed here) and the five in the short category (reviewed separately by Kevin Thomas). The winners will be announced April 11.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 25, 1990 | GEORGE BLACK, George Black is foreign editor of the Nation magazine. and
The advertising industry's Andy award this summer went to a funny series of TV spots in which suitably dubbed stock footage had Nikita Khrushchev and Fidel Castro appearing to sing the praises of Stroh's beer. Not only is communism dead, in other words; the enemies of the Cold War years, on whom the United States' identity as a superpower rested, have become a joke. Who is to take their place? The United States now proposes to expand its role as the world's policeman, but against whom?
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