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John Duigan

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ENTERTAINMENT
November 27, 1992 | DAVID GRITTEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Writer-directors, the true auteurs of the film business, are an endangered species these days. Fewer and fewer wield the power simply to make films straight from their own scripts, with no interference. And even in the rarefied company of those who do, how many enjoy the artistic freedom to make a trilogy of highly personal movies? John Duigan's probably the only one. One of Australia's most respected directors, Duigan, 43, has been working on his trilogy for more than five years.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 9, 1994 | PETER RAINER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Sirens," set in the 1930s, is a high-class exploitation film about letting yourself go in the lush Australian Blue Mountains. The Rev. Anthony Campion (Hugh Grant) and his wife Estella (Tara Fitzgerald) are visiting the mountain retreat of artist Norman Lindsay (Sam Neill) at the behest of the Archbishop of Sydney to convince him to withdraw his scandalous painting "The Crucified Venus" from an international exhibition.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 9, 1994 | PETER RAINER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Sirens," set in the 1930s, is a high-class exploitation film about letting yourself go in the lush Australian Blue Mountains. The Rev. Anthony Campion (Hugh Grant) and his wife Estella (Tara Fitzgerald) are visiting the mountain retreat of artist Norman Lindsay (Sam Neill) at the behest of the Archbishop of Sydney to convince him to withdraw his scandalous painting "The Crucified Venus" from an international exhibition.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 27, 1992 | DAVID GRITTEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Writer-directors, the true auteurs of the film business, are an endangered species these days. Fewer and fewer wield the power simply to make films straight from their own scripts, with no interference. And even in the rarefied company of those who do, how many enjoy the artistic freedom to make a trilogy of highly personal movies? John Duigan's probably the only one. One of Australia's most respected directors, Duigan, 43, has been working on his trilogy for more than five years.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 20, 1992 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John Duigan's bittersweet, luminous "Flirting" (at the Westside Pavilion and the Beverly Center) is set in rural Australia, where two Victorian red-brick fortresses peer at each other across a lake. On the one side is St. Albans, a posh prep school for boys, and on the other is the Cirencester Ladies' College. Although the time is the mid-'60s, it might as well be the 19th Century. Corporal punishment is the order of the day at St.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 3, 1988 | GREGG BARRIOS
The occupants of the red sedan tensed. Several yards ahead, blue-uniformed federales herded people out of their cars at a roadblock. Women and babies were crying. In their eagerness to find a cache of drugs or weapons the soldiers had overturned family belongings and heaved them on the side of the road. The guns the soldiers carried--and on occasion pointed at people--were loaded. A passenger in the car urged the driver not to be cocky with the young soldier who approached.
NEWS
June 3, 1990 | Sheila Benson
The Year My Voice Broke John Duigan's brilliantly acted and strangely haunting vision of adolescent angst creates three self-styled outsiders in a remote New South Wales town, circa 1962, that reminds us of the young people of "Rebel Without a Cause." With Noah Taylor, Loene Carmen and Ben Mendelsohn. Wednesday at 2 p.m. Showtime
NEWS
January 26, 1997 | Jack Mathews
On Hollywood's shamefully slim list of movies dealing with American slavery, there are next to none about the attitudes of non-plantation whites toward the runaways they encountered. With John Duigan's smart 1995 adaptation of John Ehle's 1971 novel and with star performances by Jason Patric and Thandie Newton (pictured), the short list expands to include North Carolina settler August King and slave girl Annalees (Cinemax, Wednesday at 4 p.m.).
NEWS
June 11, 1992 | JANET KINOSIAN
"The Year My Voice Broke" is one of those joyous films that rises above its own limitations. Despite a small production budget and a character-driven plot that doesn't furnish a lot of action, John Duigan's 1988 film from Australia succeeds on many levels, including brilliantly formed characters who make you care about them.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 9, 1994 | PETER RAINER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Sirens," set in the 1930s, is a high-class exploitation film about letting yourself go in the lush Australian Blue Mountains. The Rev. Anthony Campion (Hugh Grant) and his wife Estella (Tara Fitzgerald) are visiting the mountain retreat of artist Norman Lindsay (Sam Neill) at the behest of the archbishop of Sydney to persuade him to withdraw his scandalous painting "The Crucified Venus" from an international exhibition.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 20, 1992 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John Duigan's bittersweet, luminous "Flirting" (at the Westside Pavilion and the Beverly Center) is set in rural Australia, where two Victorian red-brick fortresses peer at each other across a lake. On the one side is St. Albans, a posh prep school for boys, and on the other is the Cirencester Ladies' College. Although the time is the mid-'60s, it might as well be the 19th Century. Corporal punishment is the order of the day at St.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 3, 1988 | GREGG BARRIOS
The occupants of the red sedan tensed. Several yards ahead, blue-uniformed federales herded people out of their cars at a roadblock. Women and babies were crying. In their eagerness to find a cache of drugs or weapons the soldiers had overturned family belongings and heaved them on the side of the road. The guns the soldiers carried--and on occasion pointed at people--were loaded. A passenger in the car urged the driver not to be cocky with the young soldier who approached.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 1992 | SUSAN KING
Landing the female lead at 16 in the charming Australian import "Flirting" was quite literally an eye-opening experience for Thandie Newton. Newton stars in the comedy-drama from director John Duigan ("The Year My Voice Broke") as an African teen-ager attending Australian boarding school in 1964 who falls in love with a student from the local boys' school. "Not only is the film responsible for opening my eyes to a career, but also my history as far as Africa is concerned," says Newton, now 19.
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