Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJohn Duykers
IN THE NEWS

John Duykers

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
June 15, 1997 | John Henken, John Henken is a frequent contributor to Calendar
There was a time when virtually all opera was contemporary opera. Quite a lot of time, actually, like the first three-quarters of the form's entire 400-year history. Only in this century have singers been able to build major careers without doing new work. "In the past, most singers were doing new operas," tenor John Duykers says. "Most don't now. But I think that's what it's all about--most of what we do should be new."
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
June 15, 1997 | John Henken, John Henken is a frequent contributor to Calendar
There was a time when virtually all opera was contemporary opera. Quite a lot of time, actually, like the first three-quarters of the form's entire 400-year history. Only in this century have singers been able to build major careers without doing new work. "In the past, most singers were doing new operas," tenor John Duykers says. "Most don't now. But I think that's what it's all about--most of what we do should be new."
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 9, 2001 | JOSEF WOODARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In "View From Another World" at the California Institute of the Arts Coffee House Theater this weekend, students will weave together characters and excerpts from 18th century opera repertoire, including Mozart, Gluck and Pergolesi. An overall narrative structure was created to connect the variety of musical and dramatic dots. It came about through the efforts of John Duykers, the celebrated tenor now in his second year teaching at CalArts.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 11, 1985 | ALBERT GOLDBERG
If the Los Angeles Master Chorale had to have a title for the opening concert of its 22nd season in the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion on Saturday night, "St. Mark's to Mozart" served as well as any. But the evening conducted by Roger Wagner was wholly taken over by Mozart--for what except Bach's B minor Mass or Beethoven's "Missa Solemnis" could possibly compete with Mozart's gigantic Mass in C minor, K. 427? The work has a troubled history.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 13, 2000 | JOSEF WOODARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Chamber music of the new music persuasion has found a home on select Wednesday nights at CalArts, courtesy of Chamber Music Wednesdays. The idea is logical: to tap into the in-house talents of the faculty, as well as advanced students. On Wednesday, the subject was the human voice, as heard in the flexible arena of contemporary music. But this wasn't an evening about intellectually arid or "difficult" listening, even lapsing into art-cabaret absurdity by the end.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 1988 | JOHN HENKEN
"Nixon in China," in case you were off the planet this year, is John Adams' quixotic, quasi-documentary, grandly hyped, grand opera. It was first staged by Houston Grand Opera in October, moved quickly on to New York, is headed for Amsterdam and Edinburgh this summer, and it may not be too soon to think about tickets for the local premiere, slated for the next Los Angeles Festival in September, 1990.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 7, 1986 | DAN SULLIVAN, Times Theater Critic
George Coates' works are dreamscapes. Logic and gravity don't apply. The images float above the stage, like fish seen through the window of a bathysphere. Look at the way they light up! And these fish know how to sing opera. The next thing you know, the fish has turned into an astronaut. When Coates' magic works, you hold your breath. When it doesn't work, you wonder if the stage isn't too earthbound to capture such an evanescent vision. Perhaps Coates' real metier is holograms.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 19, 1990 | KENNETH HERMAN
Funny how the next wave seems to resurrect age-old themes and archetypes. In spite of its high-tech scenario in a biomedical laboratory, Paul Dresher's contemporary opera "Power Failure" is yet another morality play on the "Paradise Lost" theme. And, for all its electronic hardware and omnipresent speakers, its musical idiom and structure paid unceasing homage to the basic conventions of Baroque opera.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 1990 | JOHN HENKEN
"Power Failure" is a curiously descriptive title for Paul Dresher and Rinde Eckert's latest "electric opera." A big, serious morality play cum rock musical, it is musically and dramatically underpowered at the crisis moments. There was nothing impotent about the performance, however, Friday at the Wadsworth Theater. The Paul Dresher Ensemble gave "Power Failure" the full advantage of vigor and imagination in its local premiere.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 7, 2001
Paula Weston Solano performs her solo play, "Appearances." Directed and developed by Jessica Kubzansky, the play follows the lives of six Asian women--a Hong Kong-born interior designer, an urban Vietnamese American teenager, a Beverly Hills socialite, a Chinese immigrant and her American-born daughter and granddaughter--from 1926 to the present.* "Appearances," Met Theatre, 1089 N. Oxford Ave., L.A. Sundays, 2 p.m.; Mondays, 8 p.m. Ends July 9. $12. (323) 242-4290.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|