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John E Bryson

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BUSINESS
September 21, 1990 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former utility regulator and environmental lawyer John E. Bryson on Thursday was elected chairman and chief executive of Southern California Edison and its holding company, replacing 64-year-old Howard P. Allen, Edison's plain-spoken and colorful chief, who will retire Oct. 1. Bryson is an executive vice president of the electric utility. Directors of SCEcorp, the holding company, also named another executive vice president, Michael R. Peevey, to the post of president, effective Oct. 1.
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NEWS
December 30, 2000 | JAMES F. PELTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The thin man in the white shirt and burgundy tie looks directly into the television camera, solemnly, somewhat awkwardly, intoning: "We . . . urgently need your assistance." John E. Bryson, chairman and chief executive of Edison International, finds himself in the surprising position of making a commercial to ask--no, beg--his 11 million customers to stop using so much of the product his company has delivered so reliably to Southern California for more than 100 years: electricity.
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BUSINESS
January 2, 1991 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nineteen ninety-one can be counted on to be a tough year during which the people in the spotlight largely will be the people on the spot--those out fighting the economic battles in a downturn. Some of the following bear watching for signs of success and others for fears of failure. Which farmland cliche will apply? Will they be part of the cream that rises to the top? Or the chaff that is separated from the wheat? ROBERT C.
BUSINESS
January 2, 1991 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nineteen ninety-one can be counted on to be a tough year during which the people in the spotlight largely will be the people on the spot--those out fighting the economic battles in a downturn. Some of the following bear watching for signs of success and others for fears of failure. Which farmland cliche will apply? Will they be part of the cream that rises to the top? Or the chaff that is separated from the wheat? ROBERT C.
NEWS
December 30, 2000 | JAMES F. PELTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The thin man in the white shirt and burgundy tie looks directly into the television camera, solemnly, somewhat awkwardly, intoning: "We . . . urgently need your assistance." John E. Bryson, chairman and chief executive of Edison International, finds himself in the surprising position of making a commercial to ask--no, beg--his 11 million customers to stop using so much of the product his company has delivered so reliably to Southern California for more than 100 years: electricity.
SPORTS
November 15, 1991 | From Staff and Wire Reports
John E. Bryson, chief executive officer of Southern California Edison, has been named to head the World Cup Soccer Bid Committee for Los Angeles-Pasadena.
NEWS
March 22, 2008
Edison chief: An article in Business on Tuesday about Edison International Chairman and Chief Executive John E. Bryson's compensation package gave an incorrect first name for the chief executive of Countrywide Financial Corp. He is Angelo Mozilo, not Anthony Mozilo.
BUSINESS
September 21, 1990 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former utility regulator and environmental lawyer John E. Bryson on Thursday was elected chairman and chief executive of Southern California Edison and its holding company, replacing 64-year-old Howard P. Allen, Edison's plain-spoken and colorful chief, who will retire Oct. 1. Bryson is an executive vice president of the electric utility. Directors of SCEcorp, the holding company, also named another executive vice president, Michael R. Peevey, to the post of president, effective Oct. 1.
BUSINESS
March 2, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Edison Will Save by Selling Winter Electricity: Southern California Edison will announce a deal to sell at least 222 megawatts of its electricity produced from Oct. 15 through Mar. 15 to PacifiCorp, a Portland, Ore.-based utility that serves portions of seven Western states. Edison expects to collect between $160 million and $250 million over the 10-year contract.
BUSINESS
December 16, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Edison Freezes All Non-Union Wages for 1995: In an attempt to cut costs, Southern California Edison Co. told employees in a letter from Chairman and Chief Executive John E. Bryson that non-union wages for clerical employees will be frozen through next year. The move affects about 9,600 of Edison's 17,800 workers. Also announced was an incentive program designed to give bonuses to the same group, ranging from 5% to 15% if performance goals are met.
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