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December 26, 1988
President-elect George Bush's son presented holiday candy and gifts to children injured in Soviet Armenia's earthquake. John E. Bush, 35, a Miami real estate developer, and his 12-year-old son George flew into the republic's capital of Yerevan aboard a cargo plane carrying relief supplies. The Bushes toured the disaster zone and stopped in the town of Spitak, destroyed by the Dec. 7 temblor. Later, they visited Yerevan's Children's Hospital No.
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NEWS
May 10, 1992 | SARA FRITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Born into a Yankee family of wealth and achievement, George Herbert Walker Bush bolted to the oil fields of West Texas as a young man to establish his independence and escape the shadow of a prominent father. Bush, the son of a U.S. senator, followed his father into politics only after he had proved himself in business. Remarkably, the same pattern has continued in the President's family.
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NEWS
May 10, 1992 | SARA FRITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Born into a Yankee family of wealth and achievement, George Herbert Walker Bush bolted to the oil fields of West Texas as a young man to establish his independence and escape the shadow of a prominent father. Bush, the son of a U.S. senator, followed his father into politics only after he had proved himself in business. Remarkably, the same pattern has continued in the President's family.
NEWS
December 26, 1988
President-elect George Bush's son presented holiday candy and gifts to children injured in Soviet Armenia's earthquake. John E. Bush, 35, a Miami real estate developer, and his 12-year-old son George flew into the republic's capital of Yerevan aboard a cargo plane carrying relief supplies. The Bushes toured the disaster zone and stopped in the town of Spitak, destroyed by the Dec. 7 temblor. Later, they visited Yerevan's Children's Hospital No.
NATIONAL
November 5, 2002 | Janet Hook, James Gerstenzang and Richard Simon, Times Staff Writers
With record-setting amounts of money invested in the fight to control Congress, President Bush and candidates around the country engaged in frenetic last-minute politicking on Monday, ending a tense but largely themeless campaign. The two major political parties are on track to raise at least $500 million in largely unregulated donations from corporations, unions and wealthy individuals -- the "soft money" financing that will be banned after election day. That will break the record set in the 2000 election, when Congress and the presidency were on the ballot.
NEWS
July 30, 2000 | RICHARD T. COOPER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's nearly noon. The sun is hot. Since an early-morning flight from Austin, Texas, George W. Bush already has given a speech to senior citizens and sat through an hour's bus ride crammed with local news interviews. He still has autographs to sign here at the Wood House barbecue shack, then a tour of the Corvette plant and an airport rally in nearby Bowling Green. Yet Bush is working three or four hundred yards of rope line as though it were a dip in the pool.
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