Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJohn E Frohnmayer
IN THE NEWS

John E Frohnmayer

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
June 16, 1990 | ALLAN PARACHINI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An advisory panel to the National Endowment for the Arts, in a confidential note to a top NEA official, has condemned "zealots, bigots and homophobics" that the committee contends have savaged the arts agency, bringing unprecedented delay in approval of 18 prestigious theater fellowships. The rare action of sending the strongly worded resolution to NEA Chairman John E. Frohnmayer was taken by the 12-member theater program panel at a two-day meeting in Washington last week.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 24, 1992 | Associated Press
John E. Frohnmayer, fired as chairman of the National Endowment for the Arts after Patrick J. Buchanan attacked the agency and vowed to padlock it, assailed Buchanan Monday as "a Frankenstein monster that George Bush helped to create." The White House forced Frohnmayer from office last month after Buchanan began using past NEA controversies to batter President Bush on the campaign trail.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
November 7, 1990 | ALLAN PARACHINI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Artists and arts organizations receiving National Endowment for the Arts grants in the coming year will not have to sign oaths declaring they will adhere to standards of "decency." The decision not to require such a certification was disclosed by NEA Chairman John E. Frohnmayer in an interview here. During the 1990 grant year, a controversial requirement against obscenity led to more than 30 grant rejections and three lawsuits.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 4, 1992 | DIANE HAITHMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
By this time last year, Tom DiMaria, the executive director of San Francisco's Frameline, knew his non-profit gay and lesbian media arts organization, which sponsors the annual International Gay and Lesbian Film Festival, would receive a $12,000 grant from the National Endowment for the Arts. The NEA has funded Frameline annually since 1988. But last month Frameline's 1992 grant application for $20,000 was delayed, DiMaria says, while the NEA "gathers additional information" on the grant.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 30, 1990 | ALLAN PARACHINI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A pair of subtle developments in the political travails of the National Endowment of the Arts last week illustrate the intensity and risk of the federal arts agency's struggle for survival. They involve questions about the willingness of NEA Chairman John E. Frohnmayer to appear to renounce the work of two artists who have been in the vortex of the yearlong arts endowment crisis. At the same time, some of the NEA's most visible allies, including Rep. Sidney Yates (D-Ill.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 26, 1991 | ALLAN PARACHINI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The chairman of the National Endowment for the Arts, facing hostile artists at the Ivar Theatre in Hollywood on Thursday night, conceded he "screwed up" a key episode of the NEA controversy and warned that the arts agency may face new funding threats in Congress. The remarks by John E. Frohnmayer apparently marked the first time the NEA chairman conceded to an audience that he made any misstep in handling the political crisis the federal arts agency faced for much of the last two years.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 1990 | ALLAN PARACHINI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A National Endowment for the Arts review panel that recommended awards to four artists that were overturned by NEA Chairman John E. Frohnmayer has asked for the panel to be reconvened to deliberate--perhaps provocatively--on how to allocate $23,000 in unspent funds. The call to reconvene the solo-performance fellowship panel was disclosed Sunday by Baltimore theater director Philip Arnoult, who chaired the panel that recommended 18 fellowship winners from among 90 applicants earlier this year.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 1991 | ALLAN PARACHINI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A conservative Mississippi-based group led by the Rev. Donald Wildmon has opened a new attack on the National Endowment for the Arts, charging that an award-winning avant-garde motion picture partially funded by the NEA includes explicit anal sex. The attack on "Poison," a film by New York-based director Todd Haynes, comes as Wildmon's American Family Assn. and at least two other conservative organizations have moved to revive last year's public debate over the NEA.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 1992 | JUDITH MICHAELSON
National Endowment for the Arts Chairman John E. Frohnmayer used a platform offered by Bravo cable to issue a 248-page encyclopedic publication, "Arts on Television: 1976-1990," listing the more than 1,000 arts programs supported by the federal agency over the past 15 years. Bravo, he explained later, invited him. As a for-profit company, Bravo cannot receive funding from the NEA, but Frohnmayer praised Bravo for seeking to present "the best" of the arts--much as the NEA does.
NEWS
March 24, 1992 | Associated Press
John E. Frohnmayer, fired as chairman of the National Endowment for the Arts after Patrick J. Buchanan attacked the agency and vowed to padlock it, assailed Buchanan Monday as "a Frankenstein monster that George Bush helped to create." The White House forced Frohnmayer from office last month after Buchanan began using past NEA controversies to batter President Bush on the campaign trail.
NEWS
February 23, 1992 | JAMES GERSTENZANG and DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Faced with a thicket of political problems, the White House has moved to clear away the underbrush of several sensitive and often divisive issues that threatened to interfere with President Bush's reelection campaign. The series of steps--including the forced resignation of John E.
NEWS
February 22, 1992 | DIANE HAITHMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John E. Frohnmayer, chairman of the National Endowment for the Arts, resigned Friday after three turbulent years as chief of the country's primary source of government funding for the arts. During his years at the NEA, Frohnmayer, an Oregon attorney, found himself charged with censorship by some artists seeking funding for controversial works and blasted by conservative groups and politicians who believed his agency supported obscene and blasphemous art and artists.
NEWS
February 22, 1992 | DIANE HAITHMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John E. Frohnmayer, chairman of the National Endowment for the Arts, resigned Friday after three turbulent years as chief of the country's primary source of government funding for the arts. During his years at the NEA, Frohnmayer, an Oregon attorney, found himself charged with censorship by some artists seeking funding for controversial works and blasted by conservative groups and politicians who believed his agency supported obscene and blasphemous art and artists.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 1992 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, TIMES ART CRITIC
Should the United States establish a government agency to put the nation's artists, museums, theaters, concert halls and other arts organizations at the political service of the White House? Is the nation ready, in other words, to organize and support its very own Ministry of Culture? Well, fasten your seat belts because here it comes--ready or not. Two weeks ago, the National Council on the Arts took a giant step toward the creation of just such a politically controlled operation.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 1992 | JUDITH MICHAELSON
National Endowment for the Arts Chairman John E. Frohnmayer used a platform offered by Bravo cable to issue a 248-page encyclopedic publication, "Arts on Television: 1976-1990," listing the more than 1,000 arts programs supported by the federal agency over the past 15 years. Bravo, he explained later, invited him. As a for-profit company, Bravo cannot receive funding from the NEA, but Frohnmayer praised Bravo for seeking to present "the best" of the arts--much as the NEA does.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 22, 1991 | ART PINE, Art Pine is a staff writer in The Times' Washington bureau
John E. Frohnmayer has just completed the halfway mark of his first term as chairman of the National Endowment for the Arts, in what has been the most tumultuous--and controversial--period in the agency's history. The 49-year-old Oregonian, who was chairman of his own state's arts commission from 1980 to 1984, has been attacked by both the right and left, pilloried by fundamentalists and gays and sued by four controversial performers whose applications for grants he rejected in 1990.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 13, 1991 | ALLAN PARACHINI
The Falwell-Helms campaign comes as another conservative religious leader, longtime NEA opponent the Rev. Donald Wildmon, has stepped up his own Capitol Hill letter-writing campaign. Wildmon's American Family Assn. is raising some new--and, most recently, very old--objections to NEA grant-making decisions.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 2, 1991 | ALLAN PARACHINI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The National Endowment for the Arts is expected to announce Thursday new grants totaling $40,000 for two prominent performance artists to whom NEA funds were rejected last year in a failed bid to placate the agency's political critics. The decision--reportedly reached last week by NEA Chairman John E. Frohnmayer--will bring to a nearly anticlimactic close one element of the ongoing arts endowment controversy. The content and timing of the announcement were confirmed by top NEA sources Tuesday.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 1991 | DENNIS McDOUGAL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Documents unearthed in a year-old Los Angeles lawsuit against the National Endowment for the Arts indicate that the NEA's chairman may have rejected four performance artists' grants last year for fear of reprisals by politicians and conservative newspaper columnists, not for artistic reasons, plaintiffs charged Tuesday.
NEWS
August 4, 1991 | OSWALD JOHNSTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The National Council on the Arts approved grants Saturday for two controversial performance artists whose applications were rejected a year ago, a move that could reopen political debate over federal funding for potentially offensive works of art. The council voted to award the grants against the apparent wishes of John E. Frohnmayer, chairman of the National Endowment for the Arts, who must make the politically sensitive decision to uphold or overturn the awards--perhaps as early as this week.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|