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John E Jacob

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NEWS
August 1, 1988 | Associated Press
National Urban League President John E. Jacob on Sunday lashed out at the Republican Party, saying he questioned its claims of trying to woo black voters in this year's presidential election. Jacob said at a news conference opening the group's four-day national meeting that presumed GOP presidential nominee George Bush declined an invitation to address the gathering, "just as Ronald Reagan didn't come in 1984."
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NEWS
July 27, 1992 | CARLA RIVERA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
National Urban League President John E. Jacob on Sunday chastised those politicians who have been "preaching" about family values, charging that the issue is being used as a thinly veiled attempt to reinforce racial stereotypes. "We know that when they say Murphy Brown from Hollywood they mean Lizzie Brown from southeast San Diego," said Jacob, referring to criticism leveled by Vice President Dan Quayle at a television character who had a child out of wedlock.
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NEWS
July 27, 1992 | CARLA RIVERA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
National Urban League President John E. Jacob on Sunday chastised those politicians who have been "preaching" about family values, charging that the issue is being used as a thinly veiled attempt to reinforce racial stereotypes. "We know that when they say Murphy Brown from Hollywood they mean Lizzie Brown from southeast San Diego," said Jacob, referring to criticism leveled by Vice President Dan Quayle at a television character who had a child out of wedlock.
NEWS
July 22, 1991 | LEE MAY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Citing "new ethnic realities," National Urban League President John E. Jacob Sunday urged black Americans to join forces with other minorities to achieve social and economic gains or risk having white Americans "pick and choose" among minority groups. Jacob warned against "divide-and-conquer tactics" that exacerbate frictions among the groups and noted a particular threat to black people, saying, "Some (minorities) will be accepted grudgingly and allowed in the door.
NEWS
July 22, 1991 | LEE MAY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Citing "new ethnic realities," National Urban League President John E. Jacob Sunday urged black Americans to join forces with other minorities to achieve social and economic gains or risk having white Americans "pick and choose" among minority groups. Jacob warned against "divide-and-conquer tactics" that exacerbate frictions among the groups and noted a particular threat to black people, saying, "Some (minorities) will be accepted grudgingly and allowed in the door.
NEWS
July 22, 1985
The president of the National Urban League, contending that relations between blacks and the Reagan Administration have reached a new low, called for a "new working relationship" with the White House. Black Americans are suffering under Administration moves to cut social programs and efforts to scrap affirmative action hiring and promotion goals, John E. Jacob told a press conference before the start of the league's annual conference in Washington.
NEWS
October 1, 1993 | Associated Press
National Urban League President John E. Jacob announced Thursday that he is retiring after 12 years as head of the civil rights organization. "The Bible tells us that 'to everything there is a season and a time to every purpose under the heaven,' " Jacob said in a statement. "It is time to retire." Jacob, 58, did not give a retirement date and said he will remain on the job until a successor is named. A search committee has been formed from the league's board of trustees.
NEWS
August 7, 1989
The National Urban League, one of the largest and most influential organizations concerned with the problems of black America, announced it would launch a no-holds-barred effort to wipe out drug trafficking in the 113 communities across America where the league has affiliate chapters. League President John E. Jacob said: "It's not a black problem. It's not a white problem. Drugs are a national problem, and if the nation isn't willing to wage war against it, we'll have to ourselves."
NEWS
July 21, 1986 | United Press International
The president of the National Urban League urged the federal government Sunday to replace its policy of "constructive engagement" toward South Africa with a policy of "constructive pressures." At the opening of the league's annual conference here, John E. Jacob said "nowhere on this globe is freedom more abused than in the racist state of South Africa. . . . And nowhere else is there an imminent danger of a terrible race war."
NEWS
January 16, 1985 | Associated Press
Calling President Reagan's record "deplorable," the Urban League said today that black America continued to lose ground economically in 1984, a year marked by greater racial polarization and heightened alienation among the poor. "That black America is not worse off today than it is, is more of a testament to its traditional ability to survive under the most difficult of conditions than to anything else," league President John E.
NEWS
August 1, 1988 | Associated Press
National Urban League President John E. Jacob on Sunday lashed out at the Republican Party, saying he questioned its claims of trying to woo black voters in this year's presidential election. Jacob said at a news conference opening the group's four-day national meeting that presumed GOP presidential nominee George Bush declined an invitation to address the gathering, "just as Ronald Reagan didn't come in 1984."
NEWS
January 15, 1987
Black America faces high unemployment, poverty, the erosion of past gains and "a resurgence of raw racism" as a result of Reagan Administration social and economic policies, the head of a major civil rights group said. Releasing the National Urban League's annual report on the status of blacks, John E. Jacob, president of the league, said blacks have been the victims of "morally unjust" national policies that have widened the gap between rich and poor, black and white.
NEWS
July 24, 1986 | From Times Wire Services
NAACP Executive Director Benjamin Hooks attacked the Reagan Administration on Wednesday, warning blacks that "the enemy we confront is a hostile environment" that threatens civil rights. Hooks, speaking at the National Urban League convention, said government agencies charged with monitoring the implementation of civil rights laws are not necessarily doing their job. "It is assumed by the public that a human rights commission will enforce state statutes. In fact, this is not so," Hooks said.
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