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John E Johnson

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 21, 1995 | CHING-CHING NI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dr. John E. Johnson, a longtime president of Rancho Santiago College, died in his sleep Friday morning at his home here. He was 78. Known to most of his colleagues and students as "Dr. J," the retired educator is remembered as a guiding light in the college district where he worked for more than half a century.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 21, 1995 | CHING-CHING NI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dr. John E. Johnson, a longtime president of Rancho Santiago College, died in his sleep Friday morning at his home here. He was 78. Known to most of his colleagues and students as "Dr. J," the retired educator is remembered as a guiding light in the college district where he worked for more than half a century.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 1990
Letter writer John E. Johnson (Sept. 16) is incorrect in saying Elvis "attempted to imitate and emulate African Americans." Elvis was influenced by R&B and blues singers but not just by them. He took his love for gospel, blues, country and pop and helped meld it all together in what became rock 'n' roll, and he always gave credit to his sources. Being black or white wasn't it--it was Elvis' charisma and his style that put him on top for so many years. Elvis had plenty of soul; if Johnson didn't see or appreciate this, that's his own opinion, but to imply that Elvis is to blame for blacks' suffering is ludicrous.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 16, 1990
An Aug. 26 letter from Scott Aylward defended Elvis Presley's role in popular music. Aylward was reacting to a Pop Eye item in which Living Colour guitarist Vernon Reid said of Presley: "He was an important performer, but the people around him capitalized on racial divisiveness. . . . Who crowned him king--did anyone ask Little Richard or Chuck Berry or Fats Domino?" It is obvious that Aylward never witnessed or understood the horrendous injustices against African Americans before the 1970s.
NEWS
June 27, 1992 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
In a breakthrough that could help greatly reduce disease in developing countries, British and American researchers have developed a new technique for growing animal and human vaccines in plants. The new approach, to be described next week at a meeting of the Royal Society in London, has the potential to cut the cost of vaccines and improve their safety and effectiveness. The result could be a vastly increased supply of inexpensive, easily storable vaccines.
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