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John E Keon

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NEWS
February 17, 1990 | ERIC BAILEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The two top mariners on the ill-fated tanker American Trader that spilled 394,000 gallons of oil off Orange County remained on the job this week. John E. Keon, the mooring master on board during the accident, said he worked this week as a pilot on vessels unloading oil at an offshore mooring in Louisiana. As a mooring master, Keon hires out his services to a variety of ships, offering guidance and knowledge of local waters during maneuvers to berth at offshore moorings.
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NEWS
May 24, 1990 | ROBERT W. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S. Coast Guard, in a report issued Wednesday, officially blamed the February oil spill off Orange County on the oil company that operated the mooring where a tanker ran over its anchor and on the pilot who was guiding the ship. The accident occurred because Golden West Refining Co. failed to regularly survey the depth of the water surrounding its mooring 1.3 miles southwest of Huntington Beach, where the American Trader spilled 397,000 gallons of crude oil into the ocean, the report said.
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NEWS
February 27, 1990 | DAN WEIKEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Saying he saw no reason to question nautical charts or do his own depth readings, the pilot of the American Trader has told state lawyers that he expected no problems the day the oil tanker punctured its hull on its own anchor, spilling 394,000 gallons of crude off Huntington Beach, attorneys for the State Lands Commission said. In a brief interview, Capt. John E. Keon declined to comment Monday on specifics of his statement to attorneys for the Lands Commission.
NEWS
February 27, 1990 | DAN WEIKEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Saying he saw no reason to question nautical charts or do his own depth readings, the pilot of the American Trader has told state lawyers that he expected no problems the day the oil tanker punctured its hull on its own anchor, spilling 394,000 gallons of crude off Huntington Beach, attorneys for the State Lands Commission said. In a brief interview, Capt. John E. Keon declined to comment Monday on specifics of his statement to attorneys for the Lands Commission.
NEWS
May 24, 1990 | ROBERT W. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S. Coast Guard, in a report issued Wednesday, officially blamed the February oil spill off Orange County on the oil company that operated the mooring where a tanker ran over its anchor and on the pilot who was guiding the ship. The accident occurred because Golden West Refining Co. failed to regularly survey the depth of the water surrounding its mooring 1.3 miles southwest of Huntington Beach, where the American Trader spilled 397,000 gallons of crude oil into the ocean, the report said.
NEWS
February 27, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Service Reports
In the wake of the oil spill off Huntington Beach, the commandant of the U.S. Coast Guard said this morning that regular depth surveys probably are going to be required in the future at all offshore tanker terminals to ensure their safety. At a press conference in Long Beach, Adm. Paul A. Yost called the fact that soundings have never been required at tanker moorings "an oversight, a goof."
NEWS
February 10, 1990 | RICHARD BEENE
The highest fine that can be levied against the firm determined to be responsible for the rupture of an oil tanker off the California coast is $250,000, officials said Friday. Cmdr. Scott Porter, a Coast Guard spokesman in Long Beach, said the Environmental Protection Agency would impose the fine only if the Coast Guard's maximum penalty--$5,000--is considered inadequate, "taking into account the magnitude of the spill." "I think we have to assume that ($5,000) isn't much for a major company. .
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 28, 1990 | ERIC BAILEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The commandant of the U.S. Coast Guard said Tuesday that the government made "a goof" by failing to require depth soundings at pipeline moorings such as the one off Huntington Beach where an oil tanker spilled 394,000 gallons of crude. "I think in the future, the Coast Guard will take a very hard look at requiring . . . a more frequent sounding and determination of the depth," Adm. Paul A. Yost said during a visit to Coast Guard district headquarters at the Port of Long Beach.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 23, 1990 | STEVEN R. CHURM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A national environmental group charged Thursday that neither the state nor federal government have adequately monitored shipping activity at a mooring terminal off Huntington Beach where 394,000 gallons of Alaskan crude oil spilled last month.
NEWS
February 14, 1990 | DAN WEIKEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Safety requirements for tankers using the offshore mooring where the American Trader spilled 394,000 gallons of crude oil last week are under investigation, U.S. Coast Guard officials said Tuesday. Coast Guard investigators and documents from the mooring's owner indicate that the fully laden tanker arrived at the mooring at the maximum allowable water depth when it hit its own anchor and began spilling Alaskan crude oil.
NEWS
February 17, 1990 | ERIC BAILEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The two top mariners on the ill-fated tanker American Trader that spilled 394,000 gallons of oil off Orange County remained on the job this week. John E. Keon, the mooring master on board during the accident, said he worked this week as a pilot on vessels unloading oil at an offshore mooring in Louisiana. As a mooring master, Keon hires out his services to a variety of ships, offering guidance and knowledge of local waters during maneuvers to berth at offshore moorings.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 27, 1990 | DAN WEIKEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seeing no reason to question nautical charts or do his own depth readings, the pilot of the American Trader has told state lawyers that he expected no problems the day the oil tanker struck its anchor and spilled 394,000 gallons of crude, officials said Monday. In a brief interview with The Times, Capt. John E. Keon declined to comment on specifics of his statement to attorneys for the State Lands Commission.
NEWS
February 10, 1990 | STEVEN R. CHURM and DAN WEIKEL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Driven by shore-bound winds, the slick from a 300,000-gallon oil spill reached miles of new beaches in Orange County on Friday, threatening major wildlife refuges and confounding cleanup crews working frantically to contain the disaster. The brown and black goo was reported washing ashore as far north as Sunset Beach, near the sensitive Bolsa Chica wetlands and a federal wildlife reserve at the Seal Beach Naval Weapons Station.
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