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John Easdale

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ENTERTAINMENT
February 3, 1999 | NATALIE NICHOLS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Punk-pop, power-pop, garage-pop, Brit-pop--almost any kind of classic pop the faithful wanted--crossed the Troubadour stage during Monday's kickoff of Poptopia 1999, an eight-day festival celebrating "song-oriented pop music." Yet in spite of brief sets and brisk pacing, the initially packed club was nearly empty by night's end. The seven L.A.
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NEWS
September 18, 2003 | Steve Baltin, Special to The Times
On a typical Monday night, the Sunset Strip is quiet, with the street and its denizens still recovering from the weekend. But this is no ordinary Monday. L.A. favorites Dramarama are reuniting for their first show in nine years. By 5 p.m., the line outside the Roxy stretches several blocks.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 1998 | MIKE BOEHM, TIME STAFF WRITER
Y'know, ah-ah-ah, once bitten twice shy, babe. --Ian Hunter, "Once Bitten Twice Shy." Different people do the same thing every day, But I just look the other way. I keep on rollin,' keep on rollin' on. --Dramarama, "Work for Food" * These days, John Easdale would rather work for food than play for it. He spent almost 10 years singing and writing songs for his living in Dramarama, a rock band that was always a contender, never a champ in the rock 'n' roll prizefighting ring.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 3, 1999 | NATALIE NICHOLS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Punk-pop, power-pop, garage-pop, Brit-pop--almost any kind of classic pop the faithful wanted--crossed the Troubadour stage during Monday's kickoff of Poptopia 1999, an eight-day festival celebrating "song-oriented pop music." Yet in spite of brief sets and brisk pacing, the initially packed club was nearly empty by night's end. The seven L.A.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 1994 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Is Dramarama to be, or not to be? John Easdale, who has the ultimate say in the question, has spent the past few months pondering it, back and forth, like some indecisive Hamlet. Dramarama's singer and main songwriter says he is willing to make one last stand with the long-running band in hopes of finally reversing its outrageous fortune in the music marketplace.
NEWS
October 20, 1994 | MIKE BOEHM
One sign of a songwriter who truly has the knack is a surplus of quality material that gets locked in the vaults or scattered around on the odd, hard-to-find B-side, movie soundtrack or import-only release.
NEWS
September 18, 2003 | Steve Baltin, Special to The Times
On a typical Monday night, the Sunset Strip is quiet, with the street and its denizens still recovering from the weekend. But this is no ordinary Monday. L.A. favorites Dramarama are reuniting for their first show in nine years. By 5 p.m., the line outside the Roxy stretches several blocks.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 1987 | STEVE HOCHMAN
Dramarama has split up. No, the locally based rock band is still quite intact, as you'll be able to see tonight at the Hollywood Palladium (with the British group the Bolshoi) and Nov. 20 at Fender's in Long Beach. But its six members recently decided that it was time to go forth from the Burbank house they'd shared --Monkees-style--for the past year and live separately. That decision marks the only major alteration in the group's life style since it moved here from Wayne, N.J.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 1996 | JOHN ROOS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In a career spent mostly leading the commercially underappreciated rock group Dramarama, singer-songwriter John Easdale has created vivid character sketches of people teetering on society's fringes, searching for acceptance and meaning. The plight of these weary souls is often tied to the choices they make at key junctions in their lives. The La Habra resident reached one of those junctions himself in 1994, when Dramarama disbanded.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 11, 1992 | MIKE BOEHM
When John Easdale turned up for an interview last week, the singer-songwriter of the rock band Dramarama was fresh from his debut as an educational resource. Easdale seated himself at a table at Mazzotti's, an unpretentious Huntington Beach eatery with a rock 'n' roll accent to its sparse decor, including posters of heavy-metal bands and a weather-beaten bass fiddle signed by the Stray Cats.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 1998 | MIKE BOEHM, TIME STAFF WRITER
Y'know, ah-ah-ah, once bitten twice shy, babe. --Ian Hunter, "Once Bitten Twice Shy." Different people do the same thing every day, But I just look the other way. I keep on rollin,' keep on rollin' on. --Dramarama, "Work for Food" * These days, John Easdale would rather work for food than play for it. He spent almost 10 years singing and writing songs for his living in Dramarama, a rock band that was always a contender, never a champ in the rock 'n' roll prizefighting ring.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 1996 | JOHN ROOS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In a career spent mostly leading the commercially underappreciated rock group Dramarama, singer-songwriter John Easdale has created vivid character sketches of people teetering on society's fringes, searching for acceptance and meaning. The plight of these weary souls is often tied to the choices they make at key junctions in their lives. The La Habra resident reached one of those junctions himself in 1994, when Dramarama disbanded.
NEWS
October 20, 1994 | MIKE BOEHM
One sign of a songwriter who truly has the knack is a surplus of quality material that gets locked in the vaults or scattered around on the odd, hard-to-find B-side, movie soundtrack or import-only release.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 1994 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Is Dramarama to be, or not to be? John Easdale, who has the ultimate say in the question, has spent the past few months pondering it, back and forth, like some indecisive Hamlet. Dramarama's singer and main songwriter says he is willing to make one last stand with the long-running band in hopes of finally reversing its outrageous fortune in the music marketplace.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 11, 1992 | MIKE BOEHM
When John Easdale turned up for an interview last week, the singer-songwriter of the rock band Dramarama was fresh from his debut as an educational resource. Easdale seated himself at a table at Mazzotti's, an unpretentious Huntington Beach eatery with a rock 'n' roll accent to its sparse decor, including posters of heavy-metal bands and a weather-beaten bass fiddle signed by the Stray Cats.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 1987 | STEVE HOCHMAN
Dramarama has split up. No, the locally based rock band is still quite intact, as you'll be able to see tonight at the Hollywood Palladium (with the British group the Bolshoi) and Nov. 20 at Fender's in Long Beach. But its six members recently decided that it was time to go forth from the Burbank house they'd shared --Monkees-style--for the past year and live separately. That decision marks the only major alteration in the group's life style since it moved here from Wayne, N.J.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 16, 1994 | MIKE BOEHM
A dozen local bands will play from noon to midnight on Sunday to raise money for Children's Hospital of Orange County in a "Christmas Behind the Curtain" concert. The benefit, which includes performances by former Dramarama singer John Easdale and the Cadillac Tramps offshoot band, Rule 62, will take place at the Tunnel dance club, 612 N. Eckhoff St., Orange. The benefit is part of the club's live alternative rock concert series dubbed The Kurtain. Admission: $7. Information: (714) 630-6128.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 24, 1992 | MIKE BOEHM
Like Martin Mull back in the '70s, Dramarama decided that what a pop show really needs is some fabulous furniture. The stage decor for the band's semi-acoustic performance on Saturday at the Coach House included a big sofa, a coffee table, lamps, many candles, a framed picture of a young George Harrison and a silent television set that was on throughout the performance, showing the 1968 film "Candy."
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