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John Edgar

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NEWS
October 4, 2012 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
When two-time PEN/Faulkner Award-winning novelist John Edgar Wideman finished his most recent book, “Briefs: Stories for the Palm of the Mind,” two years ago, he opted to take an unorthodox route to release, putting it out himself through the self-publisher Lulu. Partly, this was a family decision; Wideman's son worked for the company and, as the author recalled this week by phone from his home in Manhattan, “To do a book with him was pure joy.” At the same time, 71-year old Wideman, who has also won a MacArthur genius grant, was interested in playing with new forms, with seeing how the changing infrastructure of publishing might be exploited to get his work across in different ways.
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NEWS
October 4, 2012 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
When two-time PEN/Faulkner Award-winning novelist John Edgar Wideman finished his most recent book, “Briefs: Stories for the Palm of the Mind,” two years ago, he opted to take an unorthodox route to release, putting it out himself through the self-publisher Lulu. Partly, this was a family decision; Wideman's son worked for the company and, as the author recalled this week by phone from his home in Manhattan, “To do a book with him was pure joy.” At the same time, 71-year old Wideman, who has also won a MacArthur genius grant, was interested in playing with new forms, with seeing how the changing infrastructure of publishing might be exploited to get his work across in different ways.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 2010 | By Carolyn Kellogg
John Edgar Wideman is the kind of writer who can do whatever he likes. Best known for his 1984 memoir "Brothers and Keepers" and his fiction cycle "The Homewood Trilogy," he's won two PEN/Faulkner awards, been a National Book Award finalist and received a MacArthur "genius" grant. He has a tenured appointment at an Ivy League university. His agent, Andrew Wylie, is one of the most powerful in the business. So why is Wideman self-publishing his latest book, "Briefs: Stories for the Palm of the Mind"?
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 2012 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
"The Raven"stars John Cusack in a gothic thriller pulled from the tales of Edgar Allan Poe that regrettably falls prey to its grand and grisly ambitions - it's neither grand nor grisly enough to seriously satisfy Poe-ish cravings for murder, mystery and literary allusions. More pulp fiction than macabre masterpiece, it is nevertheless a nifty idea screenwriters Ben Livingston and Hannah Shakespeare have concocted for director James McTeigue ("V for Vendetta"). Imagine a serial killer in 19th century Baltimore suddenly replicating Poe's stories, the murders mimicking those in "The Pit and the Pendulum" and "The Murders in the Rue Morgue," among others.
BOOKS
November 12, 1989 | Richard Eder
"Wideman writes about city streets as if he farmed or fished them. There is a defining sense of place that writers so often command when their subject is climbing mountains, angling in streams, plowing fields. . . ."
BOOKS
February 10, 2008 | Ben Ehrenreich, Ben Ehrenreich is the author of the novel "The Suitors."
This is a John Edgar Wideman novel, and if you've had any acquaintance with such creatures, you'll know before turning the first page that whatever Wideman's ostensible subject may be, he will write about many other things besides, and often brilliantly. Ideas will spawn ideas. Voices will multiply. Fictions will jump the fence and cohabit with facts. Lines will blur and cross and be suddenly abandoned. The picture will escape the frame.
BOOKS
October 28, 2001 | JONATHAN LEVI, Jonathan Levi is a contributing writer to Book Review
About 10 yards from the curb of 6th Avenue, in the heart of New York's Greenwich Village, a chain-link cage, 20 feet tall, encloses a few dozen men in shorts or jeans, soiled Ts or hooded sweatshirts, who, on any given sunny day, will run one another into the ground in an attempt to put a vinyl ball through a hoop, 10 feet in the air.
BOOKS
December 25, 1994 | Mitchell Duneier, Mitchell Duneier teaches sociology at the University of California, Santa Barbara. He is the author of "Slim's Table: Race, Respectability, and Masculinity" (University of Chicago Press)
In the mind of today's American child, the father is a mysterious figure. One of two children will grow up in a home where the father is absent for six years. Of those fathers who remain living in the same home with their children, many are working two jobs. Employed or unemployed, they are gone. Anonymous. Lost. Dead. Seeking one's father has become one of the tragic personal dramas of the age in which we live.
BOOKS
January 6, 2002 | JULIUS LESTER
Since her lonely death in 1960, Zora Neale Hurston has risen to be enshrined in the literary pantheon. Her novel "Their Eyes Were Watching God" (1937) holds a deservedly prominent place in the African American and feminist literary canon and is taught widely at colleges and universities across the country. So widely, in fact, that it is of considerable interest that an unpublished manuscript of Hurston's has now come to light.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 2012 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
"The Raven"stars John Cusack in a gothic thriller pulled from the tales of Edgar Allan Poe that regrettably falls prey to its grand and grisly ambitions - it's neither grand nor grisly enough to seriously satisfy Poe-ish cravings for murder, mystery and literary allusions. More pulp fiction than macabre masterpiece, it is nevertheless a nifty idea screenwriters Ben Livingston and Hannah Shakespeare have concocted for director James McTeigue ("V for Vendetta"). Imagine a serial killer in 19th century Baltimore suddenly replicating Poe's stories, the murders mimicking those in "The Pit and the Pendulum" and "The Murders in the Rue Morgue," among others.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 2010 | By Carolyn Kellogg
John Edgar Wideman is the kind of writer who can do whatever he likes. Best known for his 1984 memoir "Brothers and Keepers" and his fiction cycle "The Homewood Trilogy," he's won two PEN/Faulkner awards, been a National Book Award finalist and received a MacArthur "genius" grant. He has a tenured appointment at an Ivy League university. His agent, Andrew Wylie, is one of the most powerful in the business. So why is Wideman self-publishing his latest book, "Briefs: Stories for the Palm of the Mind"?
BOOKS
February 10, 2008 | Ben Ehrenreich, Ben Ehrenreich is the author of the novel "The Suitors."
This is a John Edgar Wideman novel, and if you've had any acquaintance with such creatures, you'll know before turning the first page that whatever Wideman's ostensible subject may be, he will write about many other things besides, and often brilliantly. Ideas will spawn ideas. Voices will multiply. Fictions will jump the fence and cohabit with facts. Lines will blur and cross and be suddenly abandoned. The picture will escape the frame.
BOOKS
January 6, 2002 | JULIUS LESTER
Since her lonely death in 1960, Zora Neale Hurston has risen to be enshrined in the literary pantheon. Her novel "Their Eyes Were Watching God" (1937) holds a deservedly prominent place in the African American and feminist literary canon and is taught widely at colleges and universities across the country. So widely, in fact, that it is of considerable interest that an unpublished manuscript of Hurston's has now come to light.
BOOKS
October 28, 2001 | JONATHAN LEVI, Jonathan Levi is a contributing writer to Book Review
About 10 yards from the curb of 6th Avenue, in the heart of New York's Greenwich Village, a chain-link cage, 20 feet tall, encloses a few dozen men in shorts or jeans, soiled Ts or hooded sweatshirts, who, on any given sunny day, will run one another into the ground in an attempt to put a vinyl ball through a hoop, 10 feet in the air.
BOOKS
December 25, 1994 | Mitchell Duneier, Mitchell Duneier teaches sociology at the University of California, Santa Barbara. He is the author of "Slim's Table: Race, Respectability, and Masculinity" (University of Chicago Press)
In the mind of today's American child, the father is a mysterious figure. One of two children will grow up in a home where the father is absent for six years. Of those fathers who remain living in the same home with their children, many are working two jobs. Employed or unemployed, they are gone. Anonymous. Lost. Dead. Seeking one's father has become one of the tragic personal dramas of the age in which we live.
BOOKS
October 14, 1990 | Richard Eder
"It is a swirl of stories, images and voices. Some burn indelibly. Wideman has made fire his own, and there are fire figures everywhere, illuminating us and driving us back with heat and smoky confusion."
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