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John Edmond

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 17, 2009 | Elaine Woo
John Edmond Jr., a popular longtime instructor at the storied Rancho Park Golf Course in West Los Angeles whose threatened job loss in 2003 sparked a flood of protest, died Monday at a West Hills hospice. He was 67. The cause was complications of lymphoma, said his daughter, Victoria Edmond-Davis. Edmond, who trained hundreds of players during his 37 years as a teaching pro at the city-owned course, was known for his ability to instill confidence and improve his students' games with hands-on instruction, uncomplicated advice and a buoyant outlook about life as well as about golf.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 17, 2009 | Elaine Woo
John Edmond Jr., a popular longtime instructor at the storied Rancho Park Golf Course in West Los Angeles whose threatened job loss in 2003 sparked a flood of protest, died Monday at a West Hills hospice. He was 67. The cause was complications of lymphoma, said his daughter, Victoria Edmond-Davis. Edmond, who trained hundreds of players during his 37 years as a teaching pro at the city-owned course, was known for his ability to instill confidence and improve his students' games with hands-on instruction, uncomplicated advice and a buoyant outlook about life as well as about golf.
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MAGAZINE
December 14, 2003 | Edward J. Boyer, Edward J. Boyer is a former Times staff writer.
Carolyn Glassman's smile broadens into a full-blown grin as her solidly struck iron shots ascend against the morning sky. She steps away from the ball as though she can't believe what's happening. But her next swing is yet another foray into that transcendent realm of pure pleasure that golfers feel when their club sends the ball on a long, arcing flight. "I've learned more in one lesson than I have in 12 years of golf," Glassman says of her first session with John Edmond Jr.
MAGAZINE
December 14, 2003 | Edward J. Boyer, Edward J. Boyer is a former Times staff writer.
Carolyn Glassman's smile broadens into a full-blown grin as her solidly struck iron shots ascend against the morning sky. She steps away from the ball as though she can't believe what's happening. But her next swing is yet another foray into that transcendent realm of pure pleasure that golfers feel when their club sends the ball on a long, arcing flight. "I've learned more in one lesson than I have in 12 years of golf," Glassman says of her first session with John Edmond Jr.
MAGAZINE
January 11, 2004
For decades Ron Weiner set the tone and standard at Rancho Park Golf Course ("The Wise Man of Rancho Park," by Edward J. Boyer, Dec. 14). He is a top golf pro who operated the pro shop for 35 years, and he had the insight to hire John Edmond Jr. and other members of a warm, cohesive team. Rancho Park felt like family to a golfer. There was no reason to be part of the country club set when the best teachers and merchandise were available at the local park. Aviva S. Monosson Los Angeles
MAGAZINE
January 4, 2004
As a member of Rancho Park's Women's Golf Club, I must thank Edward J. Boyer for his thoughtful article "The Wise Man of Rancho Park" (Dec. 14). I have not had the pleasure of taking lessons from John Edmond Jr., but I am always greeted by his warm smile and his "How'd it go?" as I walk off the 18th green. It was time for a change at Rancho. Yong "Steve" Oh was fortunate to be granted a 15-year contract. The driving range is in desperate need of remodeling and the pro shop was obsolete.
NEWS
September 3, 1995
John Edmond Costello, 52, British historian and author who used unusual access to U.S. and Soviet intelligence files to recast chronicles of World War II and the Cold War. Particularly critical of the British military for refusing to release secret papers, Costello collaborated with KGB deputy spokesman Oleg Tsarev on the 1993 book "Deadly Illusions," the first history of Soviet spying produced with direct access to KGB archives.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 6, 2010 | By Tony Barboza
If you look up, you might spot them hanging from telephone wires and power lines by their shoelaces. Some people say the suspended sneakers, high-tops and boots mark a place where drugs are sold. Other lore holds they commemorate a killing, mark gang territory or vow retaliation. Others insist throwing shoes tied together by their laces over a wire is just a kid's prank, an effort to leave a mark that's as pointless as sticking gum under a table. No matter why they're there, so-called shoefiti isn't exactly a welcome-to-the-neighborhood message.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 1994 | LYNNE HEFFLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In Narnia, fauns and centaurs roam, a witch is defeated and a majestic lion helps four children fulfill their heroic destiny . . . You can't beat C.S. Lewis' "The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe," with its epic themes of death and redemption and good vs. evil, for a tale well told. Theatreworks/USA's hourlong musical version of the classic, now touring Southland venues--it plays Saturday at the Lobero Theatre in Santa Barbara and Feb.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 20, 2009 | Robert Faturechi
Long Beach City Councilman Dee Andrews cast a loud, drawn-out groan before describing what the Henderson Avenue neighborhood used to look like. "Henderson was just a bad, I mean, bad, bad street," he said. "That's where everybody came to pick up their drugs." Just a few years ago, two adjacent apartment complexes on the 1900 block of Henderson were havens for drug dealers and prostitutes, according to city officials. Neighbors were leery of leaving their homes, and the complexes drew a high number of police calls.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 2014 | By Christine Mai-Duc
Long Beach has approved strict rules on the use of electronic cigarettes in public spaces, tougher even than the regulations just adopted by the Los Angeles City Council. The restrictions, adopted on a 9-0 vote late Tuesday, mean that Los Angeles County's two largest cities will treat e-cigarettes in much the same way as regular cigarettes, banning their use in restaurants, bars, workplaces, city parks and beaches. In Long Beach, e-cigarettes will be classified as tobacco products, banning their sale to those younger than 18 and subjecting vendors to inspections and potential sting operations by the city's Health Department.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 2014 | By Christine Mai-Duc
Long Beach approved strict rules on the use of electronic cigarettes in public spaces late Tuesday, tougher regulations than were adopted hours earlier by the Los Angeles City Council. The restrictions, adopted on a 9-0 vote, mean Los Angeles County's two largest cities will treat e-cigarettes in much the same way as regular cigarettes, banning their use in restaurants, bars, workplaces, city parks and beaches. In Long Beach, e-cigarettes will now be classified as tobacco products, banning their sale to minors under the age of 18 and subjecting vendors to inspections and potential sting operations by the city's health department.
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