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John Eliot Gardiner

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November 21, 2012 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
With the rat race mostly run, conductors in their later years tend to slow down their tempos. They take time to smell the roses, to search for something new in pieces they've conducted all their lives. They dig for meaning and rest tired bones. But there are exceptions. Toscanini sped up in his final recordings. His Beethoven became staggeringly fast. Monday and Tuesday night at the Renée and Henry Segerstrom Concert Hall in Costa Mesa, the 69-year-old John Eliot Gardiner, who clearly still has something to prove, made Toscanini seem a tortoise.
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January 29, 2014 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
Bach and Handel did not lead intersecting lives. Bach never left central Germany, while Handel became a cosmopolitan Londoner. Bach was a man of the church and had 20 children. Handel caught the theater bug and was not a family man (recent musicology presumes him to have been gay). But what are the odds that these two pillars of the Baroque would be born less than a month apart in the winter of 1685 and 90 miles away? And in another magnificent coincidence, each produced his most compelling spiritual summing-up, a resplendent working through of crises of faith, in 1749.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 1999 | JUSTIN DAVIDSON, Justin Davidson, Newsday's music critic, was a finalist for the 1999 Pulitzer Prize in criticism
The orchestra has been summoned, the instruments tuned, Beethoven's Eighth Symphony has been ranged on music stands, and still the conductor has not arrived. The rehearsal begins anyway. The Orchestre Revolutionnaire et Romantique is a period-instrument ensemble, well-versed in historical practice, and the concertmaster stands to lead a run-through the way many conductors did in Beethoven's youth, late in the 18th century--playing and marking the tempo with his shoulders, head and bow.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 2012 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
With the rat race mostly run, conductors in their later years tend to slow down their tempos. They take time to smell the roses, to search for something new in pieces they've conducted all their lives. They dig for meaning and rest tired bones. But there are exceptions. Toscanini sped up in his final recordings. His Beethoven became staggeringly fast. Monday and Tuesday night at the Renée and Henry Segerstrom Concert Hall in Costa Mesa, the 69-year-old John Eliot Gardiner, who clearly still has something to prove, made Toscanini seem a tortoise.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 18, 1999
Mark Swed reviews the opening of a series of Beethoven's symphonies led by John Eliot Gardiner.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 1999
Early-music master John Eliot Gardiner wants you to experience Beethoven's music the way audiences did 200 years ago.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 1999
It's interesting to speculate as to why the Cleveland Orchestra musicians reacted to John Eliot Gardiner as they did ("Roiling Over Beethoven," May 16). Could it be that those who were there during George Szell's tenure remembered the excitement of playing Beethoven with him? Or that the younger ones have heard Szell's spectacular recordings of those pieces? Perhaps the scholars among them read the response to composer-pianist Muzio Clementi's criticism of one of Beethoven's Op. 59 Quartets: "Surely you do not consider these works to be music," said Clementi.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 1999
In this interview ("Roiling Over Beethoven," May 16) as well as others I've heard with John Eliot Gardiner, most or all of the talk is of the boldness, violence, revolutionary qualities and incisive edges in Beethoven's music that allegedly come alive when modern instruments are replaced with period instruments. The problem is that all of these attributes are not the essential ones. The chief attributes of Beethoven--the true reasons for his greatness as well as his relevance for people in all eras--are his humanity and love.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 16, 2006 | Richard S. Ginell, Special to The Times
The Mozart 250th birthday year has finally arrived, but then isn't every year Mozart's year? His music is a staple of classical radio, and despite the shriveling of the classical record industry, there is no shortage of Mozart recordings in shops. In a recent poll of American music critics, Mozart still ranks first on the list of favorite composers. In Austria, Mozart has long been one of the driving engines of the economy; his portrait is even on a euro coin.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 1999
In this interview ("Roiling Over Beethoven," May 16) as well as others I've heard with John Eliot Gardiner, most or all of the talk is of the boldness, violence, revolutionary qualities and incisive edges in Beethoven's music that allegedly come alive when modern instruments are replaced with period instruments. The problem is that all of these attributes are not the essential ones. The chief attributes of Beethoven--the true reasons for his greatness as well as his relevance for people in all eras--are his humanity and love.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 1999
It's interesting to speculate as to why the Cleveland Orchestra musicians reacted to John Eliot Gardiner as they did ("Roiling Over Beethoven," May 16). Could it be that those who were there during George Szell's tenure remembered the excitement of playing Beethoven with him? Or that the younger ones have heard Szell's spectacular recordings of those pieces? Perhaps the scholars among them read the response to composer-pianist Muzio Clementi's criticism of one of Beethoven's Op. 59 Quartets: "Surely you do not consider these works to be music," said Clementi.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 18, 1999
Mark Swed reviews the opening of a series of Beethoven's symphonies led by John Eliot Gardiner.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 1999 | JUSTIN DAVIDSON, Justin Davidson, Newsday's music critic, was a finalist for the 1999 Pulitzer Prize in criticism
The orchestra has been summoned, the instruments tuned, Beethoven's Eighth Symphony has been ranged on music stands, and still the conductor has not arrived. The rehearsal begins anyway. The Orchestre Revolutionnaire et Romantique is a period-instrument ensemble, well-versed in historical practice, and the concertmaster stands to lead a run-through the way many conductors did in Beethoven's youth, late in the 18th century--playing and marking the tempo with his shoulders, head and bow.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 1999
Early-music master John Eliot Gardiner wants you to experience Beethoven's music the way audiences did 200 years ago.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 13, 1987 | HERBERT GLASS
Looking for a seasonal gift recording and tired of the same old round of Handel "Messiahs" and a soprano-of-the-moment singing glitzy arrangements of carols? Then consider the "Christmas Oratorio" of Camille Saint-Saens, hardly unknown to church choirs but a rarity on recordings. It makes its compact-disc debut (Capriccio 10 216) just in time for the holidays.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 1994 | Herbert Glass, Herbert Glass is a regular contributor to Calendar
A decade ago, no self-respecting musician specializing in historically informed performance, on period instruments, would have been caught dead conducting our traditional symphony orchestras. But then, they wouldn't have been invited to do so. Conductors once ridiculed as being amateurs at worst, inspired loonies at best, e.g.
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