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John Entwistle

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ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 1988 | DUNCAN STRAUSS
John Entwistle was never exactly the most animated or commanding performer during the Who years, but now that the bassist is leading his own outfit--as opposed to moonlighting between Who duties--you'd think he'd exert a bit more presence and adopt a more active role. Wrong. There were a few instances Thursday at the Strand in Redondo Beach when the John Entwistle Band seemed aptly named, but most of the time it simply operated as a group that the ex-Who bassist just happened to be in.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 2004
While it was interesting to read how Ted Demme's wife, Amanda, has chosen to grieve for her husband, the most telling thing was what was not there ("In the Wink of an Eye," Jan. 12). Reporter Gina Piccalo states that Amanda at first "asked that there be no sentimentality, no pitiful tales of life after Ted. And please, she said, no use of the word 'widow.' " Apparently she also insisted on no use of the word "cocaine." Demme may have used cocaine rarely; the coroner found only a small amount in his system.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 1996 | SANDY MASUO
"This is a song I wrote when I was successful," former Who bassist John Entwistle wryly informed the audience at the House of Blues on Tuesday as he introduced "Success Story," the sardonic slice of rock star life from the Who's 1975 album "The Who by Numbers." Although none of Entwistle's solo work really rivals his Who legacy, he remains one of rock's premier bassists, not only because of his staggering technique, but also the personal flair with which he demonstrates it.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 2003 | From Reuters
John Entwistle's prized pink guitar, "Frankenstein," sold for almost 10 times the expected price at auction, Sotheby's said Tuesday. The pink Fender Precision guitar had been expected to fetch up to $11,300 but sold for $100,400 as part of an auction of Entwistle's collection of 150 guitars, exotic fish, celebrity sketches and gold discs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 28, 2002 | GEOFF BOUCHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John Entwistle, a founding member of the Who hailed by musicians as an innovative bassist but often overshadowed onstage by his fiery bandmates, died Thursday in Las Vegas on the eve of the band's reunion tour. He was 57. A statement from the Clark County coroner's office described the preliminary cause of death as a heart attack.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 3, 2002 | RICHARD CROMELIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If ever catharsis were in the cards, it was Monday at the Hollywood Bowl, where one of rock's most emotion-driven bands was due to perform the most emotional show of its four-decade career. And indeed, there was the extra charge in the show-opening power-chord riff of "I Can't Explain," as if guitarist Pete Townshend were trying to blast a path through the decades to the days when he and John Entwistle met as London teenagers and began playing together.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 1988 | DUNCAN STRAUSS
John Entwistle was never exactly the most animated or commanding performer during the Who years, but now that the bassist is leading his own outfit for real--as opposed to moonlighting between Who duties--you might think he would exert a bit more presence and adopt a more active role. Wrong. There were a few instances Thursday at the Strand in Redondo Beach when the John Entwistle Band seemed aptly named, but most of the time it operated as a group that the ex-Who bassist just happened to be in.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 13, 1988 | STEVE WEINSTEIN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Members of the Who will go back into the studio this January to record their first album together in six years, the band's bass guitarist John Entwistle said on Monday. Appearing at a sale of rock 'n' roll memorabilia at Sotheby's auction house in London, Entwistle said the album would be released next year. The legendary band, which includes singer Roger Daltrey, guitarist Pete Townshend and drummer Kenney Jones, recorded its last album in 1982. "We won't be going back on the road . . .
NATIONAL
July 26, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
John Entwistle, the bass player for the rock band the Who, died of a heart attack caused by cocaine use, the Clark County coroner said, ruling the death accidental and not an overdose. Entwistle, 57, was found dead June 27 in his bed at the Hard Rock Hotel in Las Vegas, one day before the band was scheduled to kick off a three-month nationwide tour at the hotel's concert hall. Entwistle was one of the band's founders.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 10, 1995
Re Megan Fenner's letter (Aug. 27) proclaiming Kristen Pfaff to be "the greatest bass player of all time": Jack Bruce, Paul McCartney, John Entwistle, John Paul Jones, Bill Wyman on the rock 'n' roll side, Stanley Clarke and Ron Carter on the jazz side. These are pretty good bass players. I never heard of Kristen Pfaff before she died, but I know that she couldn't carry those bassists' instruments. Great? Not even close. Broaden your horizons, Megan. JEFF PETERSON Huntington Beach If anyone deserves the title, it would probably be James Jamerson (who, incidentally, was the Motown sound)
NATIONAL
July 26, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
John Entwistle, the bass player for the rock band the Who, died of a heart attack caused by cocaine use, the Clark County coroner said, ruling the death accidental and not an overdose. Entwistle, 57, was found dead June 27 in his bed at the Hard Rock Hotel in Las Vegas, one day before the band was scheduled to kick off a three-month nationwide tour at the hotel's concert hall. Entwistle was one of the band's founders.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 3, 2002 | RICHARD CROMELIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If ever catharsis were in the cards, it was Monday at the Hollywood Bowl, where one of rock's most emotion-driven bands was due to perform the most emotional show of its four-decade career. And indeed, there was the extra charge in the show-opening power-chord riff of "I Can't Explain," as if guitarist Pete Townshend were trying to blast a path through the decades to the days when he and John Entwistle met as London teenagers and began playing together.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 3, 2002 | Lisa Boone
POP/ROCK Morissette Sues Owner of Alanis.com Web Site Following similar action by Madonna, Sting and Julia Roberts, singer-songwriter Alanis Morissette has taken out a cybersquatting lawsuit against the operator of Alanis.net, claiming that it sells various goods without her authorization. The lawsuit, filed in Los Angeles federal court Monday, claims that the operator of Alanis.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 29, 2002 | GEOFF BOUCHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Saying it's better to mourn a fellow musician on stage than in private, the surviving members of the Who announced Friday that they will move forward with a U.S. tour despite the death this week of bassist John Entwistle. The first show will be at the Hollywood Bowl on Monday night. "We are going on," guitarist Pete Townshend said Friday via a short statement posted on his Web site. "First show Hollywood Bowl. Pray for us John, wherever you are."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 28, 2002 | GEOFF BOUCHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John Entwistle, a founding member of the Who hailed by musicians as an innovative bassist but often overshadowed onstage by his fiery bandmates, died Thursday in Las Vegas on the eve of the band's reunion tour. He was 57. A statement from the Clark County coroner's office described the preliminary cause of death as a heart attack.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 2001 | THOMAS MELLANA, STAMFORD ADVOCATE
Thunderfingers. The Ox. The Quiet One. John Entwistle has been called many things in his career, but the one thing he's been called more than any other is this: the greatest bass player in the history of rock. Longtime bedrock of the Who, Entwistle earned the title by changing radically the role of the bass in the music and attacking the instrument with a skill still unmatched in the 35 years since he tossed off the first rock bass solo in "My Generation."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 2003 | From Reuters
John Entwistle's prized pink guitar, "Frankenstein," sold for almost 10 times the expected price at auction, Sotheby's said Tuesday. The pink Fender Precision guitar had been expected to fetch up to $11,300 but sold for $100,400 as part of an auction of Entwistle's collection of 150 guitars, exotic fish, celebrity sketches and gold discs.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 2004
While it was interesting to read how Ted Demme's wife, Amanda, has chosen to grieve for her husband, the most telling thing was what was not there ("In the Wink of an Eye," Jan. 12). Reporter Gina Piccalo states that Amanda at first "asked that there be no sentimentality, no pitiful tales of life after Ted. And please, she said, no use of the word 'widow.' " Apparently she also insisted on no use of the word "cocaine." Demme may have used cocaine rarely; the coroner found only a small amount in his system.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 16, 2000 | RANDY LEWIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the bad old days of rock hedonism, a hotel maid would have approached any room occupied by a member of the Who only with armed backup. But when a housekeeper's knock last weekend took the venerable British band's bassist, John Entwistle, away from a phone interview briefly, he politely turned her away, explaining that there was nothing in his West Hollywood hotel room in need of "Hoovering"--what we Yanks call vacuuming.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 16, 2000 | RANDY LEWIS
If a rock band were a human being, and the members were different parts of that individual, clearly songwriter-guitarist Pete Townshend would be the Who's brain and singer Roger Daltrey its voice. Until his death in 1978 from a drug overdose, drummer Keith Moon was the legs on which the group moved. But what of the enigmatic John Entwistle?
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