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John Eshaya

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July 17, 2011 | By Emili Vesilind, Special to the Los Angeles Times
L.A.-based designer John Eshaya is in a rockin' mood. The former vice president of women's wear for Ron Herman launched his swanky-jeans-and-tees collection, Jet by John Eshaya, in 2008 and has added leather and glazed denim (which resembles leather) to his stable of slim-cut jeans for fall. Popular among trend-loving celebs including Nicole Richie, Heidi Klum and Kim Kardashian, the collection is already one of the sexiest denim lines in the stratosphere, specializing in skinny looks with just the right amount of rips, tears and vintage-inspired distressing.
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July 17, 2011 | By Emili Vesilind, Special to the Los Angeles Times
L.A.-based designer John Eshaya is in a rockin' mood. The former vice president of women's wear for Ron Herman launched his swanky-jeans-and-tees collection, Jet by John Eshaya, in 2008 and has added leather and glazed denim (which resembles leather) to his stable of slim-cut jeans for fall. Popular among trend-loving celebs including Nicole Richie, Heidi Klum and Kim Kardashian, the collection is already one of the sexiest denim lines in the stratosphere, specializing in skinny looks with just the right amount of rips, tears and vintage-inspired distressing.
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MAGAZINE
September 10, 2006 | Elizabeth Khuri, Elizabeth Khuri is an assistant Style editor for West and the former managing editor of SOMA magazine.
John Eshaya navigates the brick walkway leading to the Ron Herman boutique at Fred Segal on Melrose Boulevard, dodging the hornet's nest of black boxes and reflective lenses created by photographers straining their necks and cameras because, supposedly, someone famous is shopping inside. Someone famous often is. "That's the disco part of working here," Eshaya says, heading to his office.
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January 27, 2008 | Enid Portuguez, Times Staff Writer
THE buzz circulating in downtown showrooms during the recent market week was not about emerging trends or a secret sale at Barneys. It was the news that John Eshaya, the celebrated women's wear buyer and creative director at the Ron Herman stores, who helped define Southern California style by discovering such influential brands as Juicy Couture, BCBG and Earl Jean, had left the company after 23 years. "It was time for me to leave," Eshaya said in a phone interview.
MAGAZINE
August 23, 1998 | MARK EHRMAN
I want my girl to have it first." That is John Eshaya's mission statement. "Whatever it is--a tube top, a long skirt--she's going to get it first from me. And I'll put it together to where the girl feels great in it. When a girl gets dressed and looks together and is fierce. I'm talking about, like, fabulous. Hair together. Face together. Outfit. And because she's cool enough to come to the store, I want her to be the fiercest bitch out there first. And that's the whole thing." That's it?
IMAGE
January 27, 2008 | Enid Portuguez, Times Staff Writer
THE buzz circulating in downtown showrooms during the recent market week was not about emerging trends or a secret sale at Barneys. It was the news that John Eshaya, the celebrated women's wear buyer and creative director at the Ron Herman stores, who helped define Southern California style by discovering such influential brands as Juicy Couture, BCBG and Earl Jean, had left the company after 23 years. "It was time for me to leave," Eshaya said in a phone interview.
NEWS
August 6, 1999 | BOOTH MOORE
Get an insider's look at Hollywood and fashion Wednesday at a 7 p.m. panel discussion featuring costumers and fashion designers at the Hollywood Entertainment Museum, 7021 Hollywood Blvd. "Hollywood and Fashion: Who Sets Trends?" panelists include costumers Albert Wolsky, Mona May, and Betsy Heimann, designer Bradley Bayou, and John Eshaya of Ron Herman-Fred Segal. The event is sponsored by the Fashion Group International and the Costume Designers Guild.
MAGAZINE
September 27, 1998
Cleanliness, not hipness, is next to godliness ("High Priest in the World of Hip," by Mark Ehrman, Aug. 23). The fashion-industry types of John Eshaya's generation should know that being a snob isn't hip, and that there is no excuse for unattractive behavior. Devoting three pages to this young man and his attitudes lends him the importance he believes that he and his colleagues deserve. Cissy Wechter Calabasas Fred Segal fashion maven John Eshaya is living evidence that we exist in an age of artistic mediocrity, and that the dumbing down of culture is nearly complete.
NEWS
April 23, 1999
The Los Angeles Times has won four of the 1999 Atrium Awards for fashion coverage--more than any other publication this year. Fashion writer Michael Quintanilla was recognized in the features category for a profile of Lat Naylor, a designer in San Francisco who closed up shop. Times staff writer Mimi Avins received two awards: in reporting on a specific event for her coverage of the fall collections, and in criticism for her commentary on the CaliforniaMart Designer Awards.
NEWS
August 11, 2000 | CANDACE A. WEDLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Designer Anna Sui once stood in the line. So did Todd Oldham. Both were plucked from obscurity in the annual casting call for New York designers sponsored by Henri Bendel. For the first time, the upscale Manhattan retailer will hold its "Open See" casting call in Los Angeles for local designers later this month. "It's long overdue. There's been a fashion presence in L.A," said Ed Burstell, vice president and general manager of Henri Bendel, in a telephone interview. He attributes L.A.
MAGAZINE
September 10, 2006 | Elizabeth Khuri, Elizabeth Khuri is an assistant Style editor for West and the former managing editor of SOMA magazine.
John Eshaya navigates the brick walkway leading to the Ron Herman boutique at Fred Segal on Melrose Boulevard, dodging the hornet's nest of black boxes and reflective lenses created by photographers straining their necks and cameras because, supposedly, someone famous is shopping inside. Someone famous often is. "That's the disco part of working here," Eshaya says, heading to his office.
MAGAZINE
August 23, 1998 | MARK EHRMAN
I want my girl to have it first." That is John Eshaya's mission statement. "Whatever it is--a tube top, a long skirt--she's going to get it first from me. And I'll put it together to where the girl feels great in it. When a girl gets dressed and looks together and is fierce. I'm talking about, like, fabulous. Hair together. Face together. Outfit. And because she's cool enough to come to the store, I want her to be the fiercest bitch out there first. And that's the whole thing." That's it?
NEWS
May 3, 2013 | By Booth Moore, Los Angeles Times Fashion Critic
Paris-based Balmain designer Olivier Rousteing touched down in L.A. this week and hosted a dinner at the Chateau Marmont on Thursday night to get better acquainted with Hollywood. Rousteing, just 26 years old, has been creative director of the French fashion house since 2011, when he took over from Christophe Decarnin, the designer who reinvented Balmain for a new generation with super-expensive, 1980s-throwback, hyper-embellished jackets and jeans that attracted a legion of celebrity fans, including Michael Jackson.  Rousteing has been trying to keep the momentum going.
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November 27, 2011 | By Melissa Magsaysay, Los Angeles Times
Dressing for the holidays is part of the season's fun. But forget the images you see in fashion magazines and on feel-good television commercials. In Southern California, the weather seldom requires swaddling in a plaid cashmere scarf, chunky fleece-lined boots, nubby cable sweater and peacoat. And we try to be savvy enough to just say no to a tacky Christmas sweater (unless we mean to wear it in an ultra-cool, ironic way). So how in this land of seasonless dressing does one add holiday cheer when the weather outside is far from frightful?
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