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John Espey

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 30, 2000 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John Espey, the Shanghai-born son of a missionary who became a scholarly author and UCLA English professor but also wrote delightfully about his upbringing and collaborated on such popular epic novels as "Lotus Land," has died. He was 87. Espey, who often wrote with his longtime companion, Carolyn See, and her daughter, Lisa See Kendall, under the joint pseudonym Monica Highland, died Tuesday of congestive heart failure at their Pacific Palisades home, See said.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 18, 2000 | AL MARTINEZ
I dreamed the other night I was sitting with John Espey on an evening as sweet as heaven, drinking a chilled white wine and talking about paper towel dispensers. We were on the veranda of the home he and Carolyn See once occupied on a hilltop in Topanga, overlooking a ridgeline that was slowly melting into the deepening twilight. I was intense and serious, and John was relaxed and amused, but thoroughly involved in the discussion.
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NEWS
February 13, 1991 | ELIZABETH VENANT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
J ohn Espey is learning to ride his gleaming new bicycle. The young son of a Presbyterian missionary in Shanghai, he wheels the awesome machine out onto the oval driveway, repeatedly straddles it, wobbles and sprawls on the gravel. He had hoped that Father would give him some pointers, but the house remains stubbornly silent. Still, at tea time, his cuts swabbed with iodine, the boy manfully announces that he has mastered the vehicle.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 30, 2000 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John Espey, the Shanghai-born son of a missionary who became a scholarly author and UCLA English professor but also wrote delightfully about his upbringing and collaborated on such popular epic novels as "Lotus Land," has died. He was 87. Espey, who often wrote with his longtime companion, Carolyn See, and her daughter, Lisa See Kendall, under the joint pseudonym Monica Highland, died Tuesday of congestive heart failure at their Pacific Palisades home, See said.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 9, 1999
While it makes no difference to Peter Lefcourt's thoroughly just complaint against ignoring the screenwriter's creative role (Saturday Letters, Jan. 2), hasn't he, like many others, confused the Immaculate Conception with the Virgin Birth--the former being the Roman Catholic dogma proclaimed by Pius IX in 1854 to the effect that the conception of the Virgin Mary was achieved without any taint of original sin? JOHN ESPEY Pacific Palisades
BOOKS
June 14, 1992 | MICHAEL HARRIS
WINTER RETURN by John Espey (John Daniel: $18.95; 176 pp.) Back in the days when family secrets festered for generations rather than being aired before Oprah Winfrey and millions of viewers, Tom Jerome drives east from Pasadena. He has two missions: to sell the "Wyoming acreage" that has teased his family with visions of hidden mineral wealth; and to settle the Iowa estate of his long-dead Grandfather Lloyd, a banker whose reputation for wisdom and virtue has hung over him for 30 years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 18, 2000 | AL MARTINEZ
I dreamed the other night I was sitting with John Espey on an evening as sweet as heaven, drinking a chilled white wine and talking about paper towel dispensers. We were on the veranda of the home he and Carolyn See once occupied on a hilltop in Topanga, overlooking a ridgeline that was slowly melting into the deepening twilight. I was intense and serious, and John was relaxed and amused, but thoroughly involved in the discussion.
BOOKS
August 11, 1985
Three obviously worthless books were reviewed on July 21: "Letters to Alice on First Reading Jane Austen" by Fay Weldon; "Antipodes Jane: A Novel of Jane Austen in Australia"; "Mansfield Revisited: A Sequel to Jane Austen's Mansfield Park" by Joan Aiken. They might better have been left to lie and stink unnoticed until they disintegrated naturally. But it was easy to see why John Espey of UCLA chose them as a subject. It was a great chance to exercise what he considers to be erudite wit. He probably does not realize that he was indulging in the crudest kind of sexism.
NEWS
July 7, 1994 | SCHUYLER INGLE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
I have suffered mightily for being a man of slowly spoken words. Few indeed are the patient listeners. So it was with great satisfaction some years back that I met John Espey, author of the recently published "Minor Heresies, Major Departures: A China Mission Boyhood." I had been attending a writing class, the instructor's wife had grown woefully ill, and Espey stepped in to take over for the rest of the quarter.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 9, 1999
While it makes no difference to Peter Lefcourt's thoroughly just complaint against ignoring the screenwriter's creative role (Saturday Letters, Jan. 2), hasn't he, like many others, confused the Immaculate Conception with the Virgin Birth--the former being the Roman Catholic dogma proclaimed by Pius IX in 1854 to the effect that the conception of the Virgin Mary was achieved without any taint of original sin? JOHN ESPEY Pacific Palisades
NEWS
July 7, 1994 | SCHUYLER INGLE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
I have suffered mightily for being a man of slowly spoken words. Few indeed are the patient listeners. So it was with great satisfaction some years back that I met John Espey, author of the recently published "Minor Heresies, Major Departures: A China Mission Boyhood." I had been attending a writing class, the instructor's wife had grown woefully ill, and Espey stepped in to take over for the rest of the quarter.
BOOKS
June 14, 1992 | MICHAEL HARRIS
WINTER RETURN by John Espey (John Daniel: $18.95; 176 pp.) Back in the days when family secrets festered for generations rather than being aired before Oprah Winfrey and millions of viewers, Tom Jerome drives east from Pasadena. He has two missions: to sell the "Wyoming acreage" that has teased his family with visions of hidden mineral wealth; and to settle the Iowa estate of his long-dead Grandfather Lloyd, a banker whose reputation for wisdom and virtue has hung over him for 30 years.
NEWS
February 13, 1991 | ELIZABETH VENANT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
J ohn Espey is learning to ride his gleaming new bicycle. The young son of a Presbyterian missionary in Shanghai, he wheels the awesome machine out onto the oval driveway, repeatedly straddles it, wobbles and sprawls on the gravel. He had hoped that Father would give him some pointers, but the house remains stubbornly silent. Still, at tea time, his cuts swabbed with iodine, the boy manfully announces that he has mastered the vehicle.
BOOKS
August 11, 1985
Three obviously worthless books were reviewed on July 21: "Letters to Alice on First Reading Jane Austen" by Fay Weldon; "Antipodes Jane: A Novel of Jane Austen in Australia"; "Mansfield Revisited: A Sequel to Jane Austen's Mansfield Park" by Joan Aiken. They might better have been left to lie and stink unnoticed until they disintegrated naturally. But it was easy to see why John Espey of UCLA chose them as a subject. It was a great chance to exercise what he considers to be erudite wit. He probably does not realize that he was indulging in the crudest kind of sexism.
NEWS
October 20, 1991
My cat Whippet swears he recognizes the feline in the photo accompanying John Espey's "The Literary Cat" (Classics on Cassette, Sept. 15) as a former classmate at Harvard. I say that this is not probable, since Whippet took only two classes there. He won't eat, he won't let me dispose of the paper, and he howls at night. Please settle the question and help me get some sleep. KATE McFADDEN ARCADIA
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