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John F Dean

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 3, 1992
Re "Initiative Isn't About Choice, but Money for Private Schools": Mr. (John F.) Dean's reference to "public funds" and "public dollars" demonstrates, sadly once again, that government officials (at all levels) do not realize that these monies belong to the citizens and not the bureaucrats. Thankfully, within the framework and under the protection of the Constitution, we the people can choose! LEE FERRY, Costa Mesa
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NEWS
April 21, 2002
Re "U.S.'s Broken Promises Hurt Quality of Schools," Letters, April 14: The argument by John F. Dean, Orange County's superintendent of schools, emeritus, that educating children with special needs is costing public school students $89 million may be politically expedient, but it also is divisive and somewhat specious. He fails to recognize that children with special needs are, in fact, public school students who are entitled to an equal education. His comment "no one denies that children with special needs will be better served when they are educated" would be soundly decried if "special needs" were replaced by a reference to a student's ethnicity, economic status or some other discriminatory title.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 1, 1995
I am writing to say that I take offense to the letter of Jack R. Dortignac (Dec. 18). John F. Dean, Orange County's superintendent of schools, is a wonderful Christian man. He is in a public job, and thank God he is doing his job according to the laws of our land. He does not deserve to be mentioned as one in the company of Madalyn Murray O'Hair. Our schools are public schools, not Christian schools. MERRY K. LENT Huntington Beach
NEWS
April 14, 2002
Orange County public schools, which have the second-highest enrollment in the state, are being hijacked by the federal government at a cost in excess of $89 million annually. And the figure is increasing daily. But we are not alone. Almost 6 million students statewide are losing more than $1 trillion annually to the same culprit, despite concerted efforts by local school boards and the Orange County Department of Education to stop the bleeding that began in 1975. People with disabilities need and deserve an education at public expense.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 5, 1994
As a special-education educator, I am upset that John F. Dean, our county superintendent of schools, canceled the Career Awareness Days, which have been held each year at the Anaheim Convention Center for persons with disabilities. Dean claims that the $6,000 expenditure for this event was too costly for the Department of Education, yet their budget has increased again and again since he took office. In my opinion, these "special" kids have been severely slighted, and I am going to remember it when I vote Tuesday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 5, 1995
On Oct. 28, almost 500 teachers, their families and the business and education communities celebrated Orange County's 1996 Teachers of the Year, and not one word of that unique event reached your readers. Drive-by shootings and sit-ins grabbed the headlines from 44 very deserving teachers who were applauded and rewarded as "the best of Orange County." Unique is the correct word. The Dr. James Hines Foundation, financed by philanthropists William and Sue Gross, presented $100,000 in checks.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 18, 1994
George Washington is recorded to have said to a group of Indian chiefs who decided to bring their children to American schools: "You do well to wish to learn our arts and our ways of life, and above all, the religion of Jesus Christ . . . " I'll bet that's not taught in any of Orange County's public schools. The Orange County superintendent of schools, John F. Dean, defends the elite minority ("Lawmakers Can Better Help Pupils," Dec. 11) against the vast majority of Americans who want prayer and the Bible returned to our schools.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 7, 1990 | TONY MARCANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A few months ago, most of them were all but unknown to most county residents. But when the votes were tallied early Wednesday, they had marched into the limelight. John F. Dean, a Whittier College professor of education; Joy L. Neugebauer, a veteran of the Westminster City Council, and James G. Enright, chief deputy district attorney, stunned incumbents by winning enough votes to force November runoffs. None captured a post outright, and two, Neugebauer and Enright, face uphill struggles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 1988
John F. Dean (Letters, March 20) sure doesn't let the facts get in the way of his attack on Assemblyman Gil Ferguson's (R-Newport Beach) record. Dean claims that none of Ferguson's important legislation has passed, and he attempts to cite the assemblyman's recent districtwide newsletter as his source. However, the newsletter clearly states that only a selected list of Ferguson's bills are included and further shows those measures which have passed. The mark of an effective legislator, for Republicans, is not how many laws a representative gets passed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 5, 1995
Times columnist Dana Parsons is far too hard on Orange County schools Supt. John F. Dean, who decried the "media feeding frenzy" since the Board of Supervisors' bankruptcy pronouncement on Dec. 6. Parsons maintains in his Jan. 22 column that "the media has more than honored its compact with Orange County readers." As a seasoned newspaper professional, Parsons is welcome to his opinion, just as he allows that Dean is welcome to his opinion. As a reader of the Orange County edition of The Times for 23 years and as an observer of Orange County for that period of time, I have to agree with Dean that the media has way overdone the bankruptcy coverage.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 21, 2001
Re "Young Voices Across the U.S. Pledge Allegiance," Oct. 13: The feature on Paula Burton, "The Flag Lady," was well done. We at the Orange County Department of Education worked with Burton a decade ago when she came to us with the idea to promote a love of our country through proper forms of patriotism. At that time, I reminded her of my rather limited crusade to have the Pledge of Allegiance recited correctly, as introduced by President Eisenhower. The correct phrasing is "One nation under God ...," with no pause.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 27, 2000
Statewide, the test results are in. The proof is undeniable: Orange County schools are the best, or among the best, anywhere. Before we take our bows, accepting the well-deserved accolades for academic success, we must also recognize our schools are among the worst. They are overcrowded and deteriorating before our very eyes. Roofs leak. Plumbing can no longer be patched. Paint is peeling off the walls. Fifty-year-old schools cannot be wired to handle the electronic demands of the marketplace.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 5, 1995
On Oct. 28, almost 500 teachers, their families and the business and education communities celebrated Orange County's 1996 Teachers of the Year, and not one word of that unique event reached your readers. Drive-by shootings and sit-ins grabbed the headlines from 44 very deserving teachers who were applauded and rewarded as "the best of Orange County." Unique is the correct word. The Dr. James Hines Foundation, financed by philanthropists William and Sue Gross, presented $100,000 in checks.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 29, 1995 | DAVID REYES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A man who challenged and lost to Orange County Supt. of Schools John F. Dean in last November's election has filed a federal lawsuit accusing Dean of political retaliation by not renewing his contract. Darrell Opp, head of a vocational program for county schools since 1985, is seeking $5 million in damages in a wrongful-discharge lawsuit filed last week in U.S. District Court in Santa Ana, said Opp's attorney, Mark S. Rosen.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 5, 1995
Times columnist Dana Parsons is far too hard on Orange County schools Supt. John F. Dean, who decried the "media feeding frenzy" since the Board of Supervisors' bankruptcy pronouncement on Dec. 6. Parsons maintains in his Jan. 22 column that "the media has more than honored its compact with Orange County readers." As a seasoned newspaper professional, Parsons is welcome to his opinion, just as he allows that Dean is welcome to his opinion. As a reader of the Orange County edition of The Times for 23 years and as an observer of Orange County for that period of time, I have to agree with Dean that the media has way overdone the bankruptcy coverage.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 1, 1995
I am writing to say that I take offense to the letter of Jack R. Dortignac (Dec. 18). John F. Dean, Orange County's superintendent of schools, is a wonderful Christian man. He is in a public job, and thank God he is doing his job according to the laws of our land. He does not deserve to be mentioned as one in the company of Madalyn Murray O'Hair. Our schools are public schools, not Christian schools. MERRY K. LENT Huntington Beach
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 27, 2000
Statewide, the test results are in. The proof is undeniable: Orange County schools are the best, or among the best, anywhere. Before we take our bows, accepting the well-deserved accolades for academic success, we must also recognize our schools are among the worst. They are overcrowded and deteriorating before our very eyes. Roofs leak. Plumbing can no longer be patched. Paint is peeling off the walls. Fifty-year-old schools cannot be wired to handle the electronic demands of the marketplace.
NEWS
April 21, 2002
Re "U.S.'s Broken Promises Hurt Quality of Schools," Letters, April 14: The argument by John F. Dean, Orange County's superintendent of schools, emeritus, that educating children with special needs is costing public school students $89 million may be politically expedient, but it also is divisive and somewhat specious. He fails to recognize that children with special needs are, in fact, public school students who are entitled to an equal education. His comment "no one denies that children with special needs will be better served when they are educated" would be soundly decried if "special needs" were replaced by a reference to a student's ethnicity, economic status or some other discriminatory title.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 18, 1994
George Washington is recorded to have said to a group of Indian chiefs who decided to bring their children to American schools: "You do well to wish to learn our arts and our ways of life, and above all, the religion of Jesus Christ . . . " I'll bet that's not taught in any of Orange County's public schools. The Orange County superintendent of schools, John F. Dean, defends the elite minority ("Lawmakers Can Better Help Pupils," Dec. 11) against the vast majority of Americans who want prayer and the Bible returned to our schools.
NEWS
December 12, 1994 | KEN ELLINGWOOD and SUSAN MARQUEZ OWEN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Teacher Lois Anderson is paying cash for her Christmas presents this year, so edgy is she that county paychecks may dry up next month. Gail King-Burney said there will be no stocking stuffers of music tapes or perfume for her 16-year-old daughter--maybe even no tree. Other nervous teachers talk about dipping into summer savings months early. Even normally circumspect school superintendents are publicly voicing anger that Orange County has yet to guarantee that school employees will be paid Jan. 3. Some are predicting that their schools will run out of money by spring unless they can somehow get at millions of dollars saved in the now-frozen county treasury.
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