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John F Jr Lehman

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NEWS
July 21, 1988 | GLENN F. BUNTING, Times Staff Writer
During John F. Lehman Jr.'s watch as secretary, the Navy discarded its traditional reliance on single contractors to provide everything from torpedoes to aircraft carriers. Instead, the system pitted contractor against contractor on the theory that cutthroat competition would translate into lower costs. By all accounts, it did. But, with multibillion-dollar contracts at stake, weapons suppliers began grasping for any advantage they could get, including friends in high places in the Navy.
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BUSINESS
December 2, 1988 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, Times Staff Writer
General Motors is entering secret arbitration to reduce retroactively the $5.2-billion price it paid to acquire Hughes Aircraft in 1985, claiming that it has sustained tens of millions of dollars in unexpected losses on troubled government contracts held by Hughes during the merger, The Times has learned.
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NEWS
July 2, 1988 | GLENN F. BUNTING, Times Staff Writer
Retired Adm. James A. (Ace) Lyons Jr. said Friday his name became linked to the Pentagon bribery and fraud scandal because top Navy officials approved a consulting contract for him with McDonnell Douglas Corp. last December at a time when they knew the FBI's secret investigation was under way. Lyons, in an interview with The Times, accused federal investigators and a group of "vindictive zealots" inside the Pentagon of conducting a smear campaign against him and former Navy Secretary John F.
NEWS
September 17, 1988 | Associated Press
Former Navy Secretary John F. Lehman Jr. said Friday that the Navy should use fewer consultants, but he defended his tenure against criticism arising from the current Pentagon bribery investigation. "The changes that we made in the Navy procurement system were deep and fundamental," Lehman told the House Armed Services Committee. "I do not believe that any of the changes that we made could by their nature increase the incidence of improper behavior."
NEWS
April 11, 1987 | Associated Press
John F. Lehman Jr., surrounded by military honor guards and laden with new medals for distinguished service, bade farewell Friday as the Navy's secretary and what he called the best job in the world. The 44-year-old Lehman, the Reagan Administration's brash point man for the last six years in the successful drive to enlarge the Navy's fleet to 600 warships, was hailed by Defense Secretary Caspar W. Weinberger for his management acumen and role in re-establishing U.S. maritime superiority.
NEWS
September 1, 1987
The Defense Department, in response to charges that former Navy Secretary John F. Lehman Jr. interfered with military promotion board decisions, has issued new regulations forbidding service secretaries from tampering with the selection process. Lehman's actions prompted the Senate Armed Services Committee to reject two Lehman-backed promotions because of what the panel called "impropriety and unfairness."
NEWS
June 18, 1988 | CATHLEEN DECKER, Times Staff Writer
Vice President George Bush, facing the outbreak of another Administration scandal as his presidential campaign struggles to regain momentum, on Friday declared himself "offended and shocked" at the escalating defense contract fraud investigation and vowed that the "full force of the law" would be felt by anyone convicted in the case.
NEWS
July 1, 1988 | SARA FRITZ, Times Staff Writer
The criminal inquiry into Pentagon corruption is centered predominantly on present and former Navy officials and so far has turned up no evidence against former Navy Secretary John F. Lehman Jr., a naval investigator reportedly told members of Congress on Thursday. Sources who attended a closed-door briefing for the House Armed Services Committee said Rear Adm. J. E.
BUSINESS
November 6, 1987 | From a Times Staff Writer
Former Secretary of the Navy John F. Lehman Jr. has agreed to lead an effort to take over and restructure the parent company of Pan American World Airways, the financial firm organizing the effort announced Thursday. Steven Hoffenberg, chairman of New York-based Towers Financial, also said in a telephone interview that the board of Pan Am Corp. has agreed to provide the investor group led by Lehman with the "relevant information needed" to continue study of a restructuring.
NEWS
July 8, 1988 | GLENN F. BUNTING, Times Staff Writer
Then-Navy Secretary John F. Lehman Jr. personally helped Melvyn R. Paisley, a former assistant who is now a central figure in the Pentagon fraud investigation, retain high-level security clearances when he left the Navy Department last year to work as a private defense consultant, The Times has learned.
NEWS
July 21, 1988 | GLENN F. BUNTING, Times Staff Writer
During John F. Lehman Jr.'s watch as secretary, the Navy discarded its traditional reliance on single contractors to provide everything from torpedoes to aircraft carriers. Instead, the system pitted contractor against contractor on the theory that cutthroat competition would translate into lower costs. By all accounts, it did. But, with multibillion-dollar contracts at stake, weapons suppliers began grasping for any advantage they could get, including friends in high places in the Navy.
NEWS
July 8, 1988 | GLENN F. BUNTING, Times Staff Writer
Then-Navy Secretary John F. Lehman Jr. personally helped Melvyn R. Paisley, a former assistant who is now a central figure in the Pentagon fraud investigation, retain high-level security clearances when he left the Navy Department last year to work as a private defense consultant, The Times has learned.
NEWS
July 4, 1988 | DANIEL M. WEINTRAUB and MELISSA HEALY, Times Staff Writers
The massive procurement scandal now enveloping the Defense Department had its roots not only in the greed of individuals but in some of the Reagan Administration's most basic policy goals: cutting back the bureaucracy, encouraging free-market competition and restoring the strength and prestige of America's armed forces.
NEWS
July 2, 1988 | GLENN F. BUNTING, Times Staff Writer
Retired Adm. James A. (Ace) Lyons Jr. said Friday his name became linked to the Pentagon bribery and fraud scandal because top Navy officials approved a consulting contract for him with McDonnell Douglas Corp. last December at a time when they knew the FBI's secret investigation was under way. Lyons, in an interview with The Times, accused federal investigators and a group of "vindictive zealots" inside the Pentagon of conducting a smear campaign against him and former Navy Secretary John F.
NEWS
July 1, 1988 | SARA FRITZ, Times Staff Writer
The criminal inquiry into Pentagon corruption is centered predominantly on present and former Navy officials and so far has turned up no evidence against former Navy Secretary John F. Lehman Jr., a naval investigator reportedly told members of Congress on Thursday. Sources who attended a closed-door briefing for the House Armed Services Committee said Rear Adm. J. E.
NEWS
June 30, 1988 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, Times Staff Writer
A top-secret missile called Tacit Rainbow was beset with so many problems in 1985 that scientists at the China Lake Naval Weapons Center recommended that the contract be killed. Then, former Assistant Navy Secretary Melvyn R. Paisley stepped in. Paisley, now under investigation in the Pentagon procurement scandal, overruled the scientists and kept the multimillion-dollar project alive, The Times has learned.
NEWS
June 19, 1988 | RONALD J. OSTROW and WILLIAM C. REMPEL, Times Staff Writers
Federal investigators are pursuing information that former Navy Secretary John F. Lehman Jr. may have warned Melvyn R. Paisley, former assistant Navy secretary who later became a successful defense consultant, that his telephones were being tapped in a massive probe of defense contracting fraud, The Times learned Saturday.
NEWS
June 30, 1988 | JOHN M. BRODER, Times Staff Writer
Operation Ill Wind blew like a hurricane through the homes and offices of Pentagon and defense industry officials over the past two weeks as FBI agents began seizing evidence of what they believe is massive corruption in the $150-billion-a-year Defense Department weapons-buying system. And the investigation is rapidly accumulating a cast of characters almost as vast and varied as the mountains of documents swept up by the FBI.
NEWS
June 21, 1988 | WILLIAM C. REMPEL and RONALD J. OSTROW, Times Staff Writers
A former Pentagon investigator who alerted Congress to "systemwide" procurement fraud problems three years ago said Monday that abuse was so extensive that sensitive military documents were treated "like a Sears & Roebuck catalogue" and profits gained by trading classified information made "drug money look like a drop in the bucket." Robert L.
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