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January 5, 1989 | JOHN M. BRODER, Times Staff Writer
U.S. Navy jets, while on training exercises over the Mediterranean on Wednesday, shot down two Libyan MIG-23 fighters when the Libyans appeared to threaten the U.S. warplanes, American officials said. The incident, which occurred about noon local time (2 a.m. PST) in international airspace, comes at a time of increasing U.S. hostility toward Libya over that nation's construction of what U.S. officials charge is a chemical weapons plant near the Libyan capital of Tripoli.
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NATIONAL
March 2, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
The carrier John F. Kennedy returned to the 35th president's home state for the last time before it goes out of service later this month. "Big John," as the aircraft carrier is called, will stay in Boston for five days before heading to Mayport, Fla., for decommissioning. It will be maintained on inactive status in Philadelphia. About 500 people braved a chill to watch the Kennedy cruise into Boston Harbor with sailors lining its deck. Sen. Edward M. Kennedy (D-Mass.
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NEWS
January 11, 1989 | From a Times Staff Writer
Defense Secretary Frank C. Carlucci denied Friday that the American pilots who downed two Libyan fighters last week acted without proper authority. "In my opinion, those pilots . . . acted prudently," Carlucci said. "There's no question that they were in jeopardy." The defense secretary was responding to an article in Tuesday's Washington Post that questioned whether the U.S. F-14 pilots had clearance from their superiors to fire the missiles that knocked down the two Libyan MIG-23s.
NEWS
August 23, 1989 | From United Press International
As many as 30 visitors aboard the aircraft carrier John F. Kennedy were injured Tuesday when a platform elevator's hydraulic line broke, spewing fluid and causing panic among its passengers. None of the injuries were serious, with most apparently being minor scrapes and bruises, said Kristen Anderson, a spokeswoman for Port Everglades, where the carrier was docked. Lt. Paul Jenkins, a spokesman for the Navy in Norfolk, Va.
NATIONAL
March 2, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
The carrier John F. Kennedy returned to the 35th president's home state for the last time before it goes out of service later this month. "Big John," as the aircraft carrier is called, will stay in Boston for five days before heading to Mayport, Fla., for decommissioning. It will be maintained on inactive status in Philadelphia. About 500 people braved a chill to watch the Kennedy cruise into Boston Harbor with sailors lining its deck. Sen. Edward M. Kennedy (D-Mass.
NEWS
January 6, 1989 | JOHN M. BRODER, Times Staff Writer
Libya, in the days before Wednesday's fatal clash with U.S. Navy jets, had taken a series of military steps that suggest it was expecting an American military strike, Administration sources said Thursday. The Libyan air force had stepped up flights by its fighter planes, the sources said, and Libyan jets made several close passes at U.S. reconnaissance aircraft patrolling with the Mediterranean 6th Fleet.
NEWS
January 5, 1989 | ROBIN WRIGHT, Times Staff Writer
During the past week, according to American officials, representatives of the Libyan government have initiated secret overtures to the Reagan Administration in what intermediaries describe as an attempt to prevent exactly what happened Wednesday: a military confrontation. The last contact came less than 24 hours before two U.S. F-14 Tomcats shot down two Libyan MIG-23 fighters over the Mediterranean. Ranking U.S.
NEWS
August 23, 1989 | From United Press International
As many as 30 visitors aboard the aircraft carrier John F. Kennedy were injured Tuesday when a platform elevator's hydraulic line broke, spewing fluid and causing panic among its passengers. None of the injuries were serious, with most apparently being minor scrapes and bruises, said Kristen Anderson, a spokeswoman for Port Everglades, where the carrier was docked. Lt. Paul Jenkins, a spokesman for the Navy in Norfolk, Va.
NEWS
January 5, 1989 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, Times Staff Writer
The Soviet Union warned the United States on Wednesday that a military attack against Libya would represent "a serious blow" to the improving superpower climate. The Soviet news media have been warning for several days of the possibility of a U.S. military strike against a Libyan factory south of Tripoli, the capital, that the Reagan Administration says is intended to produce chemical weapons. Yuri A.
NEWS
January 6, 1989 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, Times Staff Writer
In one of the harshest criticisms of U.S. policy in recent months, the Soviet Union on Thursday accused the Reagan Administration of "political adventurism and state terrorism" for having shot down two Libyan warplanes. Official statements also warned the United States against escalating the conflict with Libya, especially by making any attack on a purported chemical weapons factory at Rabta, 40 miles southwest of the Libyan capital, Tripoli.
NEWS
January 11, 1989 | From a Times Staff Writer
Defense Secretary Frank C. Carlucci denied Friday that the American pilots who downed two Libyan fighters last week acted without proper authority. "In my opinion, those pilots . . . acted prudently," Carlucci said. "There's no question that they were in jeopardy." The defense secretary was responding to an article in Tuesday's Washington Post that questioned whether the U.S. F-14 pilots had clearance from their superiors to fire the missiles that knocked down the two Libyan MIG-23s.
NEWS
January 6, 1989 | JOHN M. BRODER, Times Staff Writer
Libya, in the days before Wednesday's fatal clash with U.S. Navy jets, had taken a series of military steps that suggest it was expecting an American military strike, Administration sources said Thursday. The Libyan air force had stepped up flights by its fighter planes, the sources said, and Libyan jets made several close passes at U.S. reconnaissance aircraft patrolling with the Mediterranean 6th Fleet.
NEWS
January 6, 1989 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, Times Staff Writer
In one of the harshest criticisms of U.S. policy in recent months, the Soviet Union on Thursday accused the Reagan Administration of "political adventurism and state terrorism" for having shot down two Libyan warplanes. Official statements also warned the United States against escalating the conflict with Libya, especially by making any attack on a purported chemical weapons factory at Rabta, 40 miles southwest of the Libyan capital, Tripoli.
NEWS
January 5, 1989 | ROBIN WRIGHT, Times Staff Writer
During the past week, according to American officials, representatives of the Libyan government have initiated secret overtures to the Reagan Administration in what intermediaries describe as an attempt to prevent exactly what happened Wednesday: a military confrontation. The last contact came less than 24 hours before two U.S. F-14 Tomcats shot down two Libyan MIG-23 fighters over the Mediterranean. Ranking U.S.
NEWS
January 5, 1989 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, Times Staff Writer
The Soviet Union warned the United States on Wednesday that a military attack against Libya would represent "a serious blow" to the improving superpower climate. The Soviet news media have been warning for several days of the possibility of a U.S. military strike against a Libyan factory south of Tripoli, the capital, that the Reagan Administration says is intended to produce chemical weapons. Yuri A.
NEWS
January 5, 1989 | JOHN M. BRODER, Times Staff Writer
U.S. Navy jets, while on training exercises over the Mediterranean on Wednesday, shot down two Libyan MIG-23 fighters when the Libyans appeared to threaten the U.S. warplanes, American officials said. The incident, which occurred about noon local time (2 a.m. PST) in international airspace, comes at a time of increasing U.S. hostility toward Libya over that nation's construction of what U.S. officials charge is a chemical weapons plant near the Libyan capital of Tripoli.
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