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BUSINESS
September 27, 1994 | JAMES F. PELTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
McDonnell Douglas Corp., choosing a leader outside the McDonnell and Douglas families for the first time in its long history, on Monday named Harry C. Stonecipher as president and chief executive. Stonecipher, 58, has been chairman and chief executive of Sundstrand Corp., an Illinois-based maker of aerospace and industrial components. Earlier, he spent 26 years at General Electric Co., where he headed its aircraft-engines group from from 1984 to 1987.
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BUSINESS
September 27, 1994 | JAMES F. PELTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
McDonnell Douglas Corp., choosing a leader outside the McDonnell and Douglas families for the first time in its long history, on Monday named Harry C. Stonecipher as president and chief executive. Stonecipher, 58, has been chairman and chief executive of Sundstrand Corp., an Illinois-based maker of aerospace and industrial components. Earlier, he spent 26 years at General Electric Co., where he headed its aircraft-engines group from from 1984 to 1987.
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BUSINESS
July 29, 1990 | JAMES FLANIGAN
What's wrong with McDonnell Douglas? It has a record order backlog for commercial jets, in the midst of an historic boom in the aircraft industry. Yet its management seems confused and uncertain. Two weeks ago, the St. Louis-based aerospace firm, scrambling to conserve cash, announced the layoff of 17,000 employees--many of them hired only last year to help increase aircraft production.
BUSINESS
January 2, 1991 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nineteen ninety-one can be counted on to be a tough year during which the people in the spotlight largely will be the people on the spot--those out fighting the economic battles in a downturn. Some of the following bear watching for signs of success and others for fears of failure. Which farmland cliche will apply? Will they be part of the cream that rises to the top? Or the chaff that is separated from the wheat? ROBERT C.
BUSINESS
January 2, 1991 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nineteen ninety-one can be counted on to be a tough year during which the people in the spotlight largely will be the people on the spot--those out fighting the economic battles in a downturn. Some of the following bear watching for signs of success and others for fears of failure. Which farmland cliche will apply? Will they be part of the cream that rises to the top? Or the chaff that is separated from the wheat? ROBERT C.
BUSINESS
November 5, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
McDonnell Douglas Confirms China Deal: The company said its Long Beach-based Douglas Aircraft unit and China will equally split the manufacture of 40 Douglas jetliners bound for Chinese customers, in a deal valued at $1.6 billion. The transaction--amending a 2-year-old pact that called for all the planes to be built in China--was signed in Washington by McDonnell Chairman John F. McDonnell and Chinese Vice Premier Li Lanqing. The planes will be medium-sized MD-80 and MD-90 twin-engine jets.
BUSINESS
March 3, 1988 | DAVID OLMOS
Gerald A. Johnston, a veteran executive of McDonnell Douglas Astronautics Co. in Huntington Beach, has been named president of St. Louis-based McDonnell Douglas Corp. Johnston, 56, of Mission Viejo has been vice president and general manager of McDonnell Douglas Astronautics Co. since last year. The promotion was announced Wednesday and is effective immediately. It was under Johnston that Astronautics beat out Rockwell International last December for a $1.
BUSINESS
November 7, 1992 | From Associated Press
McDonnell Douglas said Friday that it is laying off another 650 workers in St. Louis and Southern California as part of its restructuring efforts. John F. McDonnell, chairman and chief executive of the nation's largest defense contractor, said 400 workers in St. Louis and 250 in California received notices Friday. Two hundred of the California jobs were cut in Huntington Beach and 50 in Santa Ana, officials said. All but 50 of the layoffs in St.
BUSINESS
July 29, 1990 | JAMES FLANIGAN
What's wrong with McDonnell Douglas? It has a record order backlog for commercial jets, in the midst of an historic boom in the aircraft industry. Yet its management seems confused and uncertain. Two weeks ago, the St. Louis-based aerospace firm, scrambling to conserve cash, announced the layoff of 17,000 employees--many of them hired only last year to help increase aircraft production.
BUSINESS
November 2, 1993 | From Associated Press
A rebound of military aircraft sales combined with company cost cutting helped aerospace-defense conglomerate McDonnell Douglas Corp. achieve record third-quarter earnings. Net earnings for the quarter, released Monday, were $142 million, or $3.62 per share, contrasted with a loss of $42 million, or $1.09 per share, for the same period last year. The results included a net gain of $41 million, or $1.05 per share, from changes in tax obligations.
BUSINESS
October 20, 1985 | CARLA LAZZARESCHI
Just four months after assuming the No. 2 position in McDonnell Douglas' $1.2-billion information systems division in Irvine, Gary Liebl has jumped to Cipher Data Products Inc. in San Diego as president, chief operating officer and a director. "Running a small public company has advantages over running a division of a very large public company," Liebl explained Friday, his first day on the job at Cipher, a manufacturer of magnetic tape devices for computers.
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