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John F Street

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NEWS
April 9, 2001 | JUDY PASTERNAK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mayor John F. Street spent New Year's Day in jail. With 120 ministers in tow, he visited all four of the city's lockups, informing inmates that the time is coming when Philadelphia's congregations will reach out to help them as soon as they are freed. Beginning this week, Street's voice--on tape--will contact parents whose children are absent from school without an excuse.
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NATIONAL
December 26, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Democratic Mayor John F. Street is getting more than $111,000 as he leaves office, money that a city official said comes from pay raises that he was entitled to but did not take. Street vetoed a pay-raise bill in the middle of an election in 2003, and the City Council overrode it. The mayor, however, chose not to take an increase, which at the time would have raised his salary from $146,000 to $165,000. Now he has decided to collect it retroactively.
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NATIONAL
December 1, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
The older brother of Philadelphia Mayor John F. Street pleaded not guilty to charges that he failed to pay taxes on $2 million in income and took consulting fees from companies that wanted city contracts. Prosecutors said that soon after his brother took office in 2000, T. Milton Street Sr., 67, began working as a high-priced consultant to companies that later won city contracts.
NATIONAL
December 1, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
The older brother of Philadelphia Mayor John F. Street pleaded not guilty to charges that he failed to pay taxes on $2 million in income and took consulting fees from companies that wanted city contracts. Prosecutors said that soon after his brother took office in 2000, T. Milton Street Sr., 67, began working as a high-priced consultant to companies that later won city contracts.
NATIONAL
October 8, 2003 | From Associated Press
Police conducting a routine security sweep of Mayor John F. Street's City Hall office found a hidden listening device Tuesday morning, authorities said. Street, who is seeking reelection, quickly sought to reassure city residents that his office was not the subject of an investigation. "I have done nothing wrong," Street said at a news conference.
NATIONAL
December 26, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Democratic Mayor John F. Street is getting more than $111,000 as he leaves office, money that a city official said comes from pay raises that he was entitled to but did not take. Street vetoed a pay-raise bill in the middle of an election in 2003, and the City Council overrode it. The mayor, however, chose not to take an increase, which at the time would have raised his salary from $146,000 to $165,000. Now he has decided to collect it retroactively.
NEWS
January 4, 2000 |
John F. Street was inaugurated as Philadelphia's 122nd mayor, promising to look beyond the city's revitalized downtown to revive schools and attack blight and crime in outlying neighborhoods. The inauguration marked the end of Edward G. Rendell's eight-year administration, which saw the nation's fifth-largest city recover from the brink of bankruptcy..
NATIONAL
July 20, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
Philadelphia's former treasurer was sentenced to 10 years in prison on corruption charges in a federal investigation that came to light when an FBI bug was discovered in Mayor John F. Street's office. The mayor was not charged in the case. Corey Kemp, 36, was found guilty in May of taking part in a scheme to trade city contracts for gifts, favors and cash.
NEWS
December 1, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
The Pennsylvania governor and Philadelphia's mayor extended the deadline for a state takeover of the city's schools after talks stalled. Gov. Mark Schweiker and Mayor John F. Street had until midnight Friday to reach an agreement, after which the state planned to assume control of the 210,000-student district. But they extended the deadline until Dec. 21. Activists protested the plan to hire private companies to run individual schools.
NATIONAL
September 30, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
PENNSYLVANIA A federal grand jury investigating alleged municipal corruption in Philadelphia indicted seven people, including a mosque leader with connections to leading politicians and an aide to the mayor's chief of staff. Prosecutors allege Shamsud-din Ali, an imam, used his political friendships to extort money from city vendors and paid a kickback to obtain a city contract for which he did no work. Others were charged for their alleged involvement in the schemes.
NATIONAL
October 8, 2003 | From Associated Press
Police conducting a routine security sweep of Mayor John F. Street's City Hall office found a hidden listening device Tuesday morning, authorities said. Street, who is seeking reelection, quickly sought to reassure city residents that his office was not the subject of an investigation. "I have done nothing wrong," Street said at a news conference.
NEWS
April 9, 2001 | JUDY PASTERNAK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mayor John F. Street spent New Year's Day in jail. With 120 ministers in tow, he visited all four of the city's lockups, informing inmates that the time is coming when Philadelphia's congregations will reach out to help them as soon as they are freed. Beginning this week, Street's voice--on tape--will contact parents whose children are absent from school without an excuse.
NATIONAL
October 10, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
Philadelphia Mayor John F. Street tried to get his reelection campaign back on track after FBI bugging devices were found in his office, insisting that he had done nothing wrong and that prosecutors had assured him he was not the target of an inquiry. He and others called on the FBI to find out who was targeted -- something the bureau refused to respond to for the third straight day. Street's GOP rival, Sam Katz, denied having anything to do with the eavesdropping equipment.
NEWS
December 15, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Negotiations over the future of the Philadelphia school system threatened to collapse as Gov. Mark Schweiker refused to take a call from Mayor John F. Street and considered shutting down talks. Schweiker was seething over a 67-page confidential report, leaked to reporters, that outlined how the mayor could "cripple the school district's ability to function" if the state took over.
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