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John Fanning

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BUSINESS
February 25, 2001 | JOSEPH MENN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If Napster Inc. goes out of business, it will leave two legacies: a dazzling invention that allowed millions to swap music over the Internet and one of the biggest botched financial opportunities of the Digital Age. In the wake of this month's federal court ruling that Napster helped consumers violate music copyrights, the company faces potentially bankrupting financial penalties and an injunction that could cripple its service.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 2014 | By Mary Forgione, Daily Deal and Travel Blogger
You could say that John Green fans are excited about hearing the author of "The Fault in Our Stars" talk. Two hours before his Saturday panel was set to begin at the L.A. Times Festival of Books, more than 20 fans had already lined up in front of the door to Bovard Auditorium for the sold-out session set to begin at 12:30 p.m. Event volunteers said fans were waiting even before attendees for an earlier panel about Cesar Chavez at the same...
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SPORTS
June 10, 1989
I admire Tommy John's competitive spirit. Though most 46-year-old men would be content with a relaxing weekend of watching sports on TV, John would rather pitch against the likes of Bo Jackson on his weekends. Though John may get into the Hall of Fame on the basis of his 288 victories, he gets my vote for his courage, his willingness to work hard, his perseverance and his intense love for the game. KENNETH L. ZIMMERMAN Cypress
ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 2009 | Richard Rayner, Rayner is the author of many books, including the novels "The Devil's Wind" and "Murder Book."
"The law beckoned her. The law, as portrayed in film and on television as nonstop excitement. The law, as cornerstone of democracy and the front lines for so many social conflicts," writes John Grisham in his latest novel "The Associate," giving neat definition to the twin allure of a subject he knows inside and out. As a society we're obsessed by the law and its promise and its uncertainties. We know that law does not equal justice, that the law often serves a corporate or political master.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 2002
The appointment of Diane Reeves as a "creative chairperson" for the Hollywood Bowl's jazz programs ("L.A. Phil Names Jazz Leader," by Diane Haithman, March 28) is not a bad thing--that is, to the extent that L.A. Philharmonic executive vice president and managing director Deborah Borda allows her some authority. But the loss of John Clayton as director of jazz programming at the Bowl is incalculable. Why was his contract not renewed? Merely because it was negotiated by Borda's controversial predecessor, Willem Wijnbergen?
NEWS
July 24, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
John H. Fanning, a leading expert on the nation's labor laws who served for 25 years on the National Labor Relations Board and was its chairman for four, died Saturday at Georgetown University Hospital of kidney failure. He was 73. In his five terms on the NLRB, Fanning participated in more than 25,000 rulings on unfair labor practices. Although a registered Democrat, he was appointed to the board by Republican President Dwight D.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 26, 1988 | MARY CAMPBELL, Associated Press
At his April performance at New York's Bottom Line, John Stewart joked, "I'm going on the Oprah Winfrey Show next week as one of those singers who won't go away." With his resonant voice, which can throb with present urgency or echo with regret for past losses, a devoted group of listeners doesn't want John Stewart to go away. For them--and new listeners are welcome--Stewart has a new album, "Punch the Big Guy."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 22, 2002 | Steve Harvey
Further proof that everyone's a critic: The Seal Beach Sun's police blotter recorded a complaint about a woman on a public street "who was seen carrying a 40-ounce Budweiser and singing Elton John songs." This incident is not believed to be related to a recent complaint in Laguna Niguel about a person "who was sitting in a parked vehicle listening to very loud Italian opera." On another sour note...: In his post-election wrap-up, columnist Dan Bernstein of the Riverside Press Enterprise wrote that one losing candidate's cause wasn't helped by the fact that she was a former USC song girl.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 2014 | By Mary Forgione, Daily Deal and Travel Blogger
You could say that John Green fans are excited about hearing the author of "The Fault in Our Stars" talk. Two hours before his Saturday panel was set to begin at the L.A. Times Festival of Books, more than 20 fans had already lined up in front of the door to Bovard Auditorium for the sold-out session set to begin at 12:30 p.m. Event volunteers said fans were waiting even before attendees for an earlier panel about Cesar Chavez at the same...
ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 2009 | Richard Rayner, Rayner is the author of many books, including the novels "The Devil's Wind" and "Murder Book."
"The law beckoned her. The law, as portrayed in film and on television as nonstop excitement. The law, as cornerstone of democracy and the front lines for so many social conflicts," writes John Grisham in his latest novel "The Associate," giving neat definition to the twin allure of a subject he knows inside and out. As a society we're obsessed by the law and its promise and its uncertainties. We know that law does not equal justice, that the law often serves a corporate or political master.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 2002
The appointment of Diane Reeves as a "creative chairperson" for the Hollywood Bowl's jazz programs ("L.A. Phil Names Jazz Leader," by Diane Haithman, March 28) is not a bad thing--that is, to the extent that L.A. Philharmonic executive vice president and managing director Deborah Borda allows her some authority. But the loss of John Clayton as director of jazz programming at the Bowl is incalculable. Why was his contract not renewed? Merely because it was negotiated by Borda's controversial predecessor, Willem Wijnbergen?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 22, 2002 | Steve Harvey
Further proof that everyone's a critic: The Seal Beach Sun's police blotter recorded a complaint about a woman on a public street "who was seen carrying a 40-ounce Budweiser and singing Elton John songs." This incident is not believed to be related to a recent complaint in Laguna Niguel about a person "who was sitting in a parked vehicle listening to very loud Italian opera." On another sour note...: In his post-election wrap-up, columnist Dan Bernstein of the Riverside Press Enterprise wrote that one losing candidate's cause wasn't helped by the fact that she was a former USC song girl.
BUSINESS
February 25, 2001 | JOSEPH MENN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If Napster Inc. goes out of business, it will leave two legacies: a dazzling invention that allowed millions to swap music over the Internet and one of the biggest botched financial opportunities of the Digital Age. In the wake of this month's federal court ruling that Napster helped consumers violate music copyrights, the company faces potentially bankrupting financial penalties and an injunction that could cripple its service.
NEWS
July 24, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
John H. Fanning, a leading expert on the nation's labor laws who served for 25 years on the National Labor Relations Board and was its chairman for four, died Saturday at Georgetown University Hospital of kidney failure. He was 73. In his five terms on the NLRB, Fanning participated in more than 25,000 rulings on unfair labor practices. Although a registered Democrat, he was appointed to the board by Republican President Dwight D.
SPORTS
June 10, 1989
I admire Tommy John's competitive spirit. Though most 46-year-old men would be content with a relaxing weekend of watching sports on TV, John would rather pitch against the likes of Bo Jackson on his weekends. Though John may get into the Hall of Fame on the basis of his 288 victories, he gets my vote for his courage, his willingness to work hard, his perseverance and his intense love for the game. KENNETH L. ZIMMERMAN Cypress
ENTERTAINMENT
April 26, 1988 | MARY CAMPBELL, Associated Press
At his April performance at New York's Bottom Line, John Stewart joked, "I'm going on the Oprah Winfrey Show next week as one of those singers who won't go away." With his resonant voice, which can throb with present urgency or echo with regret for past losses, a devoted group of listeners doesn't want John Stewart to go away. For them--and new listeners are welcome--Stewart has a new album, "Punch the Big Guy."
NEWS
December 19, 1988
A Filipino native was arrested at Chicago's O'Hare International Airport after a search of his family's luggage revealed a cache of weapons that included two Uzi submachine guns wrapped in Christmas paper and six .357 Magnums, police said. The arrest occurred as the man, identified by police as Lamberto Camacho, prepared to put his wife and two children on a Northwest Airlines jetliner headed for Manila. "We think this guy is a part-time gun-runner," said Sgt.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 11, 2006 | Richard S. Ginell, Special to The Times
Earlier this year, Bernard Labadie and his expert early-music ensemble from Quebec, Les Violons du Roy, accompanied mezzo-soprano Magdalena Kozena in the sharply detailed acoustics of the Walt Disney Concert Hall. On Thursday, we heard them in Costa Mesa's new, acoustically evolving Renee and Henry Segerstrom Concert Hall. For this concert -- an all-Mozart choral affair -- the maple-paneled doors to the hall's deep-blue reverberation chambers were thrown open wider than in previous concerts.
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