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John Ferzacca

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ENTERTAINMENT
November 7, 1991 | MARK CHALON SMITH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Like a lot of people who saw "Jaws" in 1975, John Ferzacca was moved by more than just the film's scenes of a catamaran-sized shark terrorizing everything in sight. He also was struck by the scene in which Robert Shaw, playing the crusty Quint, recalled the fate of the heavy cruiser Indianapolis, the ship he was stationed on at the end of World War II. Quint described in detail how most of the crew died after the ship was sunk by a Japanese sub.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 1994
T.H. McCulloh's review of "Nightfalls in L.A." ("Problems Make for Long 'Nightfalls,' " May 10) is both inexplicably narrow in focus and gratuitously mean-spirited, just the opposite of the play's open and generous qualities. The subject of the play concerns what happens in this large, multicultural city that is Los Angeles and directs our attention, though not exclusively, to its problems of racism, class-ism and sexism, and to its physically and socially fragile environment. What holds the play together is, it seems, just exactly what McCulloh didn't like: its fidelity to the tragicomedy of such a diverse city and the really quite excellent performances of its cast of 17 multiracial, multicultural actors playing 41 different parts.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 1994 | MARK CHALON SMITH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Los Angeles' broad mosaic of Hollywood splash, sunbaked eccentricity, casual violence and urban ache avoids simple answers at almost every freeway turn. Finding a clear perspective seems daunting. But that's what John Ferzacca is attempting with "Nightfalls in L.A.," his 35-character play about a metropolis that's as much a state of mind as it is this state's largest city. "Nightfalls" premieres tonight in Orange Coast College's Drama Lab Theatre and will continue through May 15.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 1994 | MARK CHALON SMITH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Los Angeles' broad mosaic of Hollywood splash, sunbaked eccentricity, casual violence and urban ache avoids simple answers at almost every freeway turn. Finding a clear perspective seems daunting. But that's what John Ferzacca is attempting with "Nightfalls in L.A.," his 35-character play about a metropolis that's as much a state of mind as it is this state's largest city. "Nightfalls" premieres tonight in Orange Coast College's Drama Lab Theatre and will continue through May 15.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 1994
T.H. McCulloh's review of "Nightfalls in L.A." ("Problems Make for Long 'Nightfalls,' " May 10) is both inexplicably narrow in focus and gratuitously mean-spirited, just the opposite of the play's open and generous qualities. The subject of the play concerns what happens in this large, multicultural city that is Los Angeles and directs our attention, though not exclusively, to its problems of racism, class-ism and sexism, and to its physically and socially fragile environment. What holds the play together is, it seems, just exactly what McCulloh didn't like: its fidelity to the tragicomedy of such a diverse city and the really quite excellent performances of its cast of 17 multiracial, multicultural actors playing 41 different parts.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 1991 | JAN HERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"The Failure to Zig-Zag," John Ferzacca's courtroom drama about the World War II sinking of the heavy cruiser Indianapolis and the scapegoating of its captain by the U.S. Navy, steams straight ahead in its determination to lay out the facts of that sorry case. Though very much a period piece of the faraway '40s, "Zig-Zag" has undeniable relevance to the Navy of today.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 1, 1992 | T.H. McCULLOH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
One of the most dangerous theatrical liaisons is that between performers and directors, and high style. For the most part, director John Ferzacca finds the relationship comfortable. But sometimes he misses just slightly in his staging of Christopher Hampton's very theatrical adaptation of Choderlos de Laclos' classic novel "Les Liaisons Dangereuses" at Orange Coast College.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 1990 | MARK CHALON SMITH
"Steel Magnolias" can be a mawkish visit to familiar Southern terrain, a sentimental play built on personality and predictability. But, if you give it rope, it can also persuade with a gabby charm that makes for a pleasantly uncomplicated experience. The latter is what director John Ferzacca is after at Orange Coast College.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 27, 1996
In chronological order: * "Fefu and Her Friends," UC Irvine (February). A difficult play given style and dimension by director Danielle Bedau. * "Bambi," Laguna Playhouse (May). Director Joe Lauderdale's vivid, intelligent concept made this classic a visual and dramatic joy for adults as well as children. * "Holiday," Vanguard Theatre, Fullerton (June). A faithful and sparkling production of Philip Barry's comedy, loaded with good performances and high comedy style.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 28, 1990 | MARK CHALON SMITH
In "Playing With Fire," Barbara Field's spin on the Frankenstein tale, the monster is all grown up. Forget the usual grunting behemoth with malice on his mind. This middle-ager thinks in complicated terms (he refers to the "sanctimonious platitudes of mankind") and feels deeply (he describes prayer as "a kind of ecstasy"). He even reads; his favorite book is "Paradise Lost." He's also one of the saddest creations around. If anybody's got a soul, it's this guy.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 1, 1992 | T.H. McCULLOH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
One of the most dangerous theatrical liaisons is that between performers and directors, and high style. For the most part, director John Ferzacca finds the relationship comfortable. But sometimes he misses just slightly in his staging of Christopher Hampton's very theatrical adaptation of Choderlos de Laclos' classic novel "Les Liaisons Dangereuses" at Orange Coast College.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 1991 | JAN HERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"The Failure to Zig-Zag," John Ferzacca's courtroom drama about the World War II sinking of the heavy cruiser Indianapolis and the scapegoating of its captain by the U.S. Navy, steams straight ahead in its determination to lay out the facts of that sorry case. Though very much a period piece of the faraway '40s, "Zig-Zag" has undeniable relevance to the Navy of today.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 7, 1991 | MARK CHALON SMITH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Like a lot of people who saw "Jaws" in 1975, John Ferzacca was moved by more than just the film's scenes of a catamaran-sized shark terrorizing everything in sight. He also was struck by the scene in which Robert Shaw, playing the crusty Quint, recalled the fate of the heavy cruiser Indianapolis, the ship he was stationed on at the end of World War II. Quint described in detail how most of the crew died after the ship was sunk by a Japanese sub.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 1991 | JAMES SCARBOROUGH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In spite of the lumbering beginning, John Ferzacca's production of Larry Shue's "Wenceslas Square" at Orange Coast College is as taut as a coiled spring. It could have been a ho-hum production, a supposed euphoric homecoming of sorts neutralized by a bare-bones stage setting that was lit as if underwater and populated by players mouthing scripts without reading between the lines.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 10, 1994 | T.H. McCULLOH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Playwrights are prone to write plays about certain ills of society. But in his "Nightfalls in L.A.," writer-director John Ferzacca has decided to take everything amiss in the City of Angels and put it all into one interminable pageant. There's no kitchen sink here, but that's about the only thing missing.
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