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John Fithian

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ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 2014 | By Richard Verrier
Fed up with rising movie ticket prices? Theater owners may have some relief in store. John Fithian, president of the National Assn. of Theatre Owners, told reporters gathered at the CinemaCon trade show in Las Vegas that plans were underway to test the idea of offering discounted tickets one day of the week. Exhibitors in Canada and some Latin American countries have had success with the approach, and now their counterparts in the U.S. are giving it some serious consideration, Fithian said.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 2014 | By Richard Verrier
Fed up with rising movie ticket prices? Theater owners may have some relief in store. John Fithian, president of the National Assn. of Theatre Owners, told reporters gathered at the CinemaCon trade show in Las Vegas that plans were underway to test the idea of offering discounted tickets one day of the week. Exhibitors in Canada and some Latin American countries have had success with the approach, and now their counterparts in the U.S. are giving it some serious consideration, Fithian said.
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BUSINESS
March 30, 2011 | By Richard Verrier, Los Angeles Times
In his first speech to Hollywood since becoming head of the Motion Picture Assn. of America nine days ago former Sen. Christopher J. Dodd delivered a reassuring message about the state of the movie business. Dodd, speaking at the annual gathering of the cinema owners in Las Vegas on Tuesday, acknowledged concern about this year's falloff in theater attendance — which is down about 20% so far this year — but predicted that the slowdown would be temporary. "I for one do not believe the sky is falling," Dodd said.
BUSINESS
April 25, 2012 | By Richard Verrier, Los Angeles Times
LAS VEGAS — After a year of box-office doldrums and a period of ugly clashes with studio executives over when movies should be released into the home, theater industry leaders sounded considerably more optimistic about the outlook for their industry. John Fithian, president of the National Assn. of Theatre Owners, told hundreds of exhibitors gathered Tuesday at the industry's annual trade show in Las Vegas that there were many reasons to celebrate, including a turnaround at the turnstiles.
BUSINESS
February 24, 2011 | By Richard Verrier, Los Angeles Times
Movie ticket sales may have been flat in the U.S. and Canada last year, but Hollywood's international cinema business soared to new heights in 2010. Global box-office receipts for all films released last year reached a high of $31.8 billion, an increase of 8% over 2009, according to a newly released report from the Motion Picture Assn. of America. The theatrical market statistics report, which the MPAA conducts annually, found that though ticket sales in the U.S. and Canada remained unchanged at $10.6 billion, overseas revenue jumped 13% in 2010 compared with 2009.
BUSINESS
April 25, 2012 | By Richard Verrier, Los Angeles Times
LAS VEGAS — After a year of box-office doldrums and a period of ugly clashes with studio executives over when movies should be released into the home, theater industry leaders sounded considerably more optimistic about the outlook for their industry. John Fithian, president of the National Assn. of Theatre Owners, told hundreds of exhibitors gathered Tuesday at the industry's annual trade show in Las Vegas that there were many reasons to celebrate, including a turnaround at the turnstiles.
BUSINESS
March 23, 2012 | By Richard Verrier, Los Angeles Times
Even as domestic ticket sales stalled last year, the international movie business climbed to new heights. A report released Thursday by the Motion Picture Assn. of America states that global box-office receipts for all films released around the world in 2011 reached $32.6 billion, up 3% over 2010 and 35% higher than five years ago. The rise in global ticket sales reflects the rapid growth in overseas markets, particularly in China, where the box office grew by a whopping 35% to $2 billion in 2011 alone, according to the MPAA.
BUSINESS
October 29, 2008 | Dawn C. Chmielewski and Meg James, Chmielewski and James are Times staff writers.
Worried by the worsening economy, Kristen Olson decided she'd better start saving money. She tallied her expenses and was walloped by sticker shock: She and her roommates were spending $900 a year for cable TV. "I'm not watching $900 worth of cable," said the 25-year-old advertising account coordinator, who lives in North Hollywood. She's trying to persuade her roommates to drop the service.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 2014 | By Richard Verrier
In a historic step for Hollywood, Paramount Pictures has become the first major studio to stop releasing movies on film in the United States. Paramount recently notified theater owners that the Will Ferrell comedy “Anchorman 2: The Legend Continues,” which opened in December, would be the last movie that would it would release on 35-millimeter film. The studio's Oscar-nominated film “The Wolf of Wall Street” from director Martin Scorsese is the first major studio film that was released all digitally, according to theater industry executives who were briefed on the plans but not authorized to speak about them.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 2013 | By Richard Verrier
The head of the theater industry trade group urged Hollywood studios to give their audiences more choices at the box office. John Fithian, chief executive of the National Assn. of Theatre Owners, told a crowd of theater owners and studio executives gathered at the annual CinemaCon convention in Las Vegas that box office attendance had fallen 12% this year mainly because of a dearth of family movies. "Indeed, we were down in the first quarter. But why? Simply put -- not enough choices," Fithian said in his State of the Industry speech on the second day of the convention.
BUSINESS
March 23, 2012 | By Richard Verrier, Los Angeles Times
Even as domestic ticket sales stalled last year, the international movie business climbed to new heights. A report released Thursday by the Motion Picture Assn. of America states that global box-office receipts for all films released around the world in 2011 reached $32.6 billion, up 3% over 2010 and 35% higher than five years ago. The rise in global ticket sales reflects the rapid growth in overseas markets, particularly in China, where the box office grew by a whopping 35% to $2 billion in 2011 alone, according to the MPAA.
BUSINESS
March 30, 2011 | By Richard Verrier, Los Angeles Times
In his first speech to Hollywood since becoming head of the Motion Picture Assn. of America nine days ago former Sen. Christopher J. Dodd delivered a reassuring message about the state of the movie business. Dodd, speaking at the annual gathering of the cinema owners in Las Vegas on Tuesday, acknowledged concern about this year's falloff in theater attendance — which is down about 20% so far this year — but predicted that the slowdown would be temporary. "I for one do not believe the sky is falling," Dodd said.
BUSINESS
February 24, 2011 | By Richard Verrier, Los Angeles Times
Movie ticket sales may have been flat in the U.S. and Canada last year, but Hollywood's international cinema business soared to new heights in 2010. Global box-office receipts for all films released last year reached a high of $31.8 billion, an increase of 8% over 2009, according to a newly released report from the Motion Picture Assn. of America. The theatrical market statistics report, which the MPAA conducts annually, found that though ticket sales in the U.S. and Canada remained unchanged at $10.6 billion, overseas revenue jumped 13% in 2010 compared with 2009.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 2004 | Elaine Dutka, Times Staff Writer
The NC-17 rating, long seen as the kiss of death for a movie, is suddenly coming to life. Three NC-17 films have emerged since the first of the year. Bernardo Bertolucci's "The Dreamers" came out in February, while "Young Adam," starring Ewan McGregor and Tilda Swinton, premiered on Friday. And "High Tension," a French horror film, is due out from Lions Gate Films in the fall.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 11, 1998 | JASON KANDEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
More than 20 students and teachers were taken to hospitals Tuesday after a construction crew working on the expansion of a La Habra middle school ruptured a natural gas line, sending fumes into classrooms. The students, who complained of nausea and dizziness, were treated and released to their parents. The accident at Washington Middle School occurred about 9:20 a.m. when a backhoe operator cut into the gas line.
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