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June 5, 1989 | David Olmos, Times staff writer
The international race to develop high-definition television has prompted dire warnings about the potential loss of American jobs, technological competitiveness and economic clout if the United States doesn't rise to the challenge. Experts agree that Japan holds a clear lead in development of the televisions of the future, which will have much brighter, sharper picture screens. American industry and government have argued that if the United States loses this race, the domestic electronics industry runs the risk of becoming an also-ran.
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BUSINESS
June 5, 1989 | David Olmos, Times staff writer
The international race to develop high-definition television has prompted dire warnings about the potential loss of American jobs, technological competitiveness and economic clout if the United States doesn't rise to the challenge. Experts agree that Japan holds a clear lead in development of the televisions of the future, which will have much brighter, sharper picture screens. American industry and government have argued that if the United States loses this race, the domestic electronics industry runs the risk of becoming an also-ran.
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NEWS
June 7, 1986
Companies that have closed or sold South African operations since January, 1984: AMR, Dallas/Fort Worth Airport, Tex.; Alexander & Alexander Services, Baltimore; American Express, New York; Applied Power, Milwaukee; Atlantic Richfield, Los Angeles; BBDO International, New York; Bell & Howell, Skokie, Ill.; Blue Bell, Greensboro, N.C.; Boeing, Seattle.
NEWS
May 26, 1985 | BILL SING, Times Staff Writer
To fight apartheid, the city treasury of Washington will withdraw deposits from any bank that lends in South Africa. But the city's employee pension fund is allowed to invest in stocks of those banks. New York City generally makes it harder for firms selling to the South African police and military to win city contracts. But the Big Apple isn't sure which companies those are.
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