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John Frankenheimer

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 7, 2002 | JON THURBER and SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
John Frankenheimer, the director best known for the classic political thriller "The Manchurian Candidate" but who was equally successful in television's Golden Age and, more recently, making films for cable, died Saturday morning. He was 72. He died at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles of complications from a stroke following recent spinal surgery, a publicist for HBO announced.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
August 10, 2013 | By Sheri Linden
Laurence Olivier was among the world's most accomplished actors, but he wasn't a big enough star. That was the consensus of Paramount honchos in 1965, when director John Frankenheimer was planning his eighth feature, the science fiction thriller "Seconds," and wanted the esteemed Brit in the lead role. What might at first have seemed like executive-suite folly led to an inspired instance of counterintuitive casting: Rock Hudson, Hollywood's reigning romantic-comedy dreamboat, in what is unquestionably one of the darkest studio movies ever made.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 5, 1989 | NINA J. EASTON
Their stories are the tragic underside of fame and fortune, Hollywood-style: Bright young talents who storm from the starting gate at breakneck speed only to slam into brick walls of their own making. Promising careers are destroyed by drink or drugs, or the pressures of a fickle business, or as penance for their own tempestuous reputations. More than once, director John Frankenheimer nearly joined that body count.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 2012 | By Mark Olsen, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The week-after-week format of television admittedly builds a depth of character study richer and deeper than most movies are capable of. But would you watch a 13- or 22-hour movie? Huge swathes of recent episodes of "Mad Men" would hit the cutting-room floor in even the most luxuriously paced movie, as the amount of wheel-spinning and narrative churning that can go into a television show would never pass with cinemagoers. Face it, the recent "Fat Betty" story line would definitely be trimmed from "Mad Men: The Movie.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 1993 | MICHAEL McCALL, Michael McCall is a free-lance writer based in Nashville
John Frankenheimer gazed across the littered yard of the old, vacated Tennessee State Prison, where he was filming an HBO movie based on the 1971 Attica prison riots. Frustrated at his crew's inability to create enough smoke for a climactic scene in which New York state police drop tear gas from a helicopter, the director tersely shouted at an assistant director, pleading with him to get it right "this time, please!"
ENTERTAINMENT
August 10, 2013 | By Sheri Linden
Laurence Olivier was among the world's most accomplished actors, but he wasn't a big enough star. That was the consensus of Paramount honchos in 1965, when director John Frankenheimer was planning his eighth feature, the science fiction thriller "Seconds," and wanted the esteemed Brit in the lead role. What might at first have seemed like executive-suite folly led to an inspired instance of counterintuitive casting: Rock Hudson, Hollywood's reigning romantic-comedy dreamboat, in what is unquestionably one of the darkest studio movies ever made.
NEWS
January 6, 2011
In a career that spans about 40 films, Ben Affleck has learned a few lessons from his various directors over the years. Among them: Gus Van Sant ("Good Will Hunting") ? I learned from Gus the power of letting actors make their own discoveries. I was so used to the director coming over after a take and saying, "How about this? How about that?" We'd do a take and he'd say, "OK, one more. OK, one more. " Finally I'd say, "Gus, what do you think?" And he'd say, "I don't know. What do you think?"
ENTERTAINMENT
July 8, 2002 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The filmmaker John Frankenheimer, who died Saturday from a massive stroke at the age of 72, was an extraordinary man to have lunch with. We met weekly at an Italian restaurant in the Hollywood Hills for nearly three years while I recorded an oral history with him for the Directors Guild of America. We never remembered to stop the tape while the waiter took our orders, so the faithful transcript records our week-to-week preferences between the penne and the angel hair, the penne usually winning.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 9, 2002
A memorial service for director John Frankenheimer is scheduled at 7 p.m. on July 29 at the Directors Guild of America headquarters, 7920 Sunset Blvd. Frankenheimer died Saturday in Los Angeles of a post-surgical stroke. He was 72. The family has asked that, instead of flowers, memorial donations be made to the John Frankenheimer Scholarship Fund, in care of the Directors Guild Foundation, 7920 Sunset Blvd., Los Angeles, CA 90046. The scholarship will support students who are studying
ENTERTAINMENT
August 30, 1997
I feel very remiss that I failed to mention Delbert Mann in the list of live television greats ("The Mature Candidate," Calendar, Aug. 21). Delbert has been an inspiration to me all my life as well as one of my best friends. He is also a brilliant director. JOHN FRANKENHEIMER, Los Angeles
NEWS
January 6, 2011
In a career that spans about 40 films, Ben Affleck has learned a few lessons from his various directors over the years. Among them: Gus Van Sant ("Good Will Hunting") ? I learned from Gus the power of letting actors make their own discoveries. I was so used to the director coming over after a take and saying, "How about this? How about that?" We'd do a take and he'd say, "OK, one more. OK, one more. " Finally I'd say, "Gus, what do you think?" And he'd say, "I don't know. What do you think?"
ENTERTAINMENT
November 28, 2009 | By Susan King
When the small screen was in its infancy in the 1950s, a group of young, scrappy writers such as Rod Serling, JP Miller, Reginald Rose and Paddy Chayefsky and directors such as John Frankenheimer, Alex Segal, Delbert Mann, Franklin Schaffner, Sidney Lumet and George Roy Hill collaborated on a series of live television dramas that set the gold standard for the fledgling medium. FOR THE RECORD: 'The Golden Age of Television': A DVD review in Saturday's Calendar on "The Golden Age of Television" misstated "A Wind From the South" director Daniel Petrie's first name as Donald, and misidentified the director of "Requiem for a Heavyweight," Ralph Nelson, as John Frankenheimer.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 20, 2008 | Dennis Lim, Special to The Times
If John Frankenheimer's place in the pantheon of Hollywood auteurs seems a little shaky, it is largely because he had one of the longest dry spells of any major director. The one-time master of brute action and political paranoia, who died in 2002, produced a disproportionate amount of his notable work in the 1960s, a period that accounts for three of the four movies in the new Frankenheimer DVD set from United Artists.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 2004
(Un)finished business "Exorcist: The Beginning" takes possession of theaters today after a rewrite, recast, reshoot by a different director (Renny Harlin) than an earlier finished version (Paul Schrader). Harlin stepped in after the late John Frankenheimer dropped out because of his health. Another high-profile project based on an idea that sprang from "The Graduate" recently replaced director Ted Griffin with Rob Reiner.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 18, 2004
I found it an almost glaring omission that the story about actor Clive Owen ("His Own Dark Knight," July 4) did not mention his stint as the star of the BMW mini-movie marketing effort from a couple of years ago. It was something that garnered him a fair amount of notoriety over here, at least with BMW enthusiasts, though he was still an "unknown" actor at the time. The ads were filmed as short vignettes, yet totally scripted as mini-movies, and he was the star in each one. Those movies were directed by some of the best-known directors in Hollywood, including the late John Frankenheimer.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 2002 | Susan King
John Frankenheimer, who died July 6 at age 72, received an Emmy nomination Thursday for best director for HBO's "Paths to War." Frankenheimer previously received four Emmy Awards for best director of a movie or miniseries for 1994's "Against the Wall" (1994), "The Burning Season" (1995), "Andersonville" (1996) and "George Wallace" (1998). He also was nominated five times for best direction between 1955 and 1960. If Frankenheimer wins, he'll join a handful of posthumous recipients.
SPORTS
September 19, 1992
Murray, in his ignorance, says that Edberg does not do anything terribly well. This is such a ludicrous statement. He attacks the net better than anyone. His twist serve is arguably the best in the history of the game. His mental attitude is unbelievable. To think how many times he had to overcome adversity in his last four matches in the U.S. Open is mind-boggling. In my opinion, the great two-time U.S. Open, two-time Wimbledon and two-time Australian Open champion doesn't need, and shouldn't be subjected to, the kind of cheap shots that Murray took in his column.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 26, 1989 | CLAUDIA PUIG, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
After years in the works and a few false starts, the American Cinematheque will open to the public, in temporary quarters, on June 9. The Cinematheque--to be housed in the Directors Guild of America theater complex in Hollywood--will feature film and video screenings on the second weekend of every month and continue until the construction of the permanent home of the Cinematheque--on Hollywood Boulevard next to the Chinese Theater--is completed in...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 9, 2002
A memorial service for director John Frankenheimer is scheduled at 7 p.m. on July 29 at the Directors Guild of America headquarters, 7920 Sunset Blvd. Frankenheimer died Saturday in Los Angeles of a post-surgical stroke. He was 72. The family has asked that, instead of flowers, memorial donations be made to the John Frankenheimer Scholarship Fund, in care of the Directors Guild Foundation, 7920 Sunset Blvd., Los Angeles, CA 90046. The scholarship will support students who are studying
ENTERTAINMENT
July 8, 2002 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The filmmaker John Frankenheimer, who died Saturday from a massive stroke at the age of 72, was an extraordinary man to have lunch with. We met weekly at an Italian restaurant in the Hollywood Hills for nearly three years while I recorded an oral history with him for the Directors Guild of America. We never remembered to stop the tape while the waiter took our orders, so the faithful transcript records our week-to-week preferences between the penne and the angel hair, the penne usually winning.
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