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August 15, 2005 | Steven Bodzin, Times Staff Writer
House Majority Leader Tom DeLay (R-Texas) joined conservative church leaders Sunday to encourage evangelicals to help advance the nomination of Judge John G. Roberts Jr. to the Supreme Court. At a 90-minute Nashville service that featured religious and political leaders, DeLay said, "We're here to protect the court so it can keep protecting us."
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 2013 | By Jim Newton, Los Angeles Times
At his confirmation hearings for the position of chief justice of the United States, John G. Roberts Jr. parried skeptics with a reassuring metaphor: "Judges are like umpires," he memorably testified. "Umpires don't make the rules, they apply them. The role of an umpire and a judge is critical to make sure everybody plays by the rules. But it is a limited role. " Senators were charmed by that modesty and impressed by Roberts' undeniable brilliance, but his chief justiceship has hardly been a model of restraint.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 2013 | By Jim Newton, Los Angeles Times
At his confirmation hearings for the position of chief justice of the United States, John G. Roberts Jr. parried skeptics with a reassuring metaphor: "Judges are like umpires," he memorably testified. "Umpires don't make the rules, they apply them. The role of an umpire and a judge is critical to make sure everybody plays by the rules. But it is a limited role. " Senators were charmed by that modesty and impressed by Roberts' undeniable brilliance, but his chief justiceship has hardly been a model of restraint.
NATIONAL
June 29, 2012 | By Paul West, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - The Supreme Court's surprise healthcare ruling was a lift for President Obama, preventing what would have been an embarrassing setback in an election year. And it came from an unexpected source - a conservative jurist whose confirmation Obama voted against as a senator. Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr.'s majority opinion could well alter voter attitudes on a landmark piece of social legislation that, up to now, has been dimly understood and largely unpopular. At the very least, it enables the president to go before the voters in November with his signature legislative achievement intact.
NATIONAL
August 6, 2005 | Maura Reynolds, Times Staff Writer
The Bush administration Friday issued a blanket rejection of Democratic requests for further documents connected to Supreme Court nominee John G. Roberts Jr., arguing it was "simply contrary to the public interest" to release the material. The letter from the Justice Department came in response to several Democratic requests, including one earlier Friday, seeking access to 16 case files from Roberts' service as deputy solicitor general in the administration of President George H.W. Bush.
NATIONAL
July 21, 2005 | P.J. Huffstutter, Times Staff Writer
When Supreme Court nominee John G. Roberts Jr. studied Virgil and classic literature at a private, all-boys boarding high school, he preferred to read the books written in their original Latin. As captain of the football team, he has described himself as a "small but slow" running back -- one whom opponents often towered over and routinely pummeled. Home was a two-story beach cottage a couple of blocks from the shore of Lake Michigan, about 60 miles east of downtown Chicago.
NATIONAL
July 22, 2005 | Henry Weinstein, Times Staff Writer
Although much of the early sparring over Supreme Court nominee John G. Roberts Jr. has focused on how he might vote on abortion, his biggest impact could be on cases involving business, which he has represented frequently in his legal career. While in private practice, Roberts represented numerous companies -- Chrysler Corp., Litton Systems, Toyota Motor Corp., WellPoint Health Networks and NBC -- as well as the U.S. Chamber of Commerce and trade associations for the mining and beer industries.
NATIONAL
August 3, 2005 | David G. Savage and Maura Reynolds, Times Staff Writers
Supreme Court nominee John G. Roberts Jr. pledged Tuesday to bring "modesty and humility" to his job as a justice on the high court, saying the judges did not have a "commission to solve society's problems." "Judges must be constantly aware that their role, while important, is limited," he wrote in response to a 67-page questionnaire from the Senate. Roberts also reported a personal net worth of $5.2 million, most of it in stocks and mutual funds.
NATIONAL
June 14, 2008 | David G. Savage, Times Staff Writer
When the Supreme Court goes on recess at the end of this month, Justice Anthony M. Kennedy will be off to his summer teaching job in Salzburg, Austria. For the 19th year, he will teach a class called "Fundamental Rights in Europe and the United States" for the McGeorge Law School. He tells his American and European students that the belief in individual freedom and the respect for human dignity transcends national borders.
NATIONAL
January 21, 2009 | David G. Savage
Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr., swearing in a new president for the first time, stumbled Tuesday over the opening words of the oath of office. President Obama, realizing the minor miscue, paused and then followed the chief justice in repeating the right words slightly out of order. The presidential oath comes directly from the Constitution.
NATIONAL
June 29, 2012 | By David G. Savage, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - Led by a chief justice who some conservatives immediately branded a turncoat, the Supreme Court upheld most of President Obama's healthcare law Thursday, resolving a high-stakes constitutional clash not seen in decades and handing Obama a victory that surprised many in Washington. Chief Justice John G. RobertsJr.and the four liberal justices joined to uphold the Democrats' most ambitious social legislation in a generation. The unpopular requirement that everyone buy health insurance or pay a penalty - likened by detractors to a rule that everyone purchase broccoli - was unconstitutional as a mandate, Roberts said, but valid as long as it was simply considered a tax. "We do not consider whether the act embodies sound policies," wrote Roberts, a conservative appointed to the court by PresidentGeorge W. Bushin 2005.
NATIONAL
January 1, 2011 | By David Savage, Washington Bureau
Without naming names or casting blame, Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. called on Republicans and Democrats on Friday to put aside their differences and move more quickly to approve qualified nominees to be federal judges. About 110 judgeships ? about one in eight in the federal judiciary ? are vacant, and the Senate approved only 60 of President Obama's court nominees in the last two years. That was the lowest total for a new president in four decades. In Roberts' year-end report on the federal courts, he said that this "persistent problem has developed ?
NATIONAL
August 8, 2010 | By Janet Hook, Los Angeles Times
Elena Kagan was sworn in as the 112th justice of the Supreme Court on Saturday, opening the first era in U.S. history with three women serving on the nation's premier judicial bench. Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. administered the oath at the Supreme Court just two days after the Senate's 63-37 vote Thursday to confirm her nomination and one day after President Obama hosted a White House reception in Kagan's honor. She is not expected to dramatically change the ideological balance of the court because she replaces retired Justice John Paul Stevens, a fellow liberal jurist.
NATIONAL
March 10, 2010 | By David G. Savage
Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. told law students Tuesday that he found it "very troubling" to be surrounded by loudly cheering critics at President Obama's State of the Union address, saying it was reason enough for the justices not to attend the annual speech to Congress. "To the extent the State of the Union has degenerated into a political pep rally, I'm not sure why we are there," Roberts said at the University of Alabama School of Law. Obama's speech in January came a week after the high court ruled 5 to 4 that corporations had a free-speech right to spend unlimited sums to elect or defeat candidates for office.
NATIONAL
January 21, 2009 | David G. Savage
Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr., swearing in a new president for the first time, stumbled Tuesday over the opening words of the oath of office. President Obama, realizing the minor miscue, paused and then followed the chief justice in repeating the right words slightly out of order. The presidential oath comes directly from the Constitution.
NATIONAL
September 22, 2005 | Maura Reynolds, Times Staff Writer
Senate Democrats split ranks Wednesday over the nomination of John G. Roberts Jr. to be chief justice, with the Senate Judiciary Committee's top Democrat announcing his support just one day after the chamber's top Democrat said he would oppose Roberts. The division between the leaders -- Sen. Patrick J.
NATIONAL
August 8, 2010 | By Janet Hook, Los Angeles Times
Elena Kagan was sworn in as the 112th justice of the Supreme Court on Saturday, opening the first era in U.S. history with three women serving on the nation's premier judicial bench. Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. administered the oath at the Supreme Court just two days after the Senate's 63-37 vote Thursday to confirm her nomination and one day after President Obama hosted a White House reception in Kagan's honor. She is not expected to dramatically change the ideological balance of the court because she replaces retired Justice John Paul Stevens, a fellow liberal jurist.
NATIONAL
January 1, 2011 | By David Savage, Washington Bureau
Without naming names or casting blame, Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. called on Republicans and Democrats on Friday to put aside their differences and move more quickly to approve qualified nominees to be federal judges. About 110 judgeships ? about one in eight in the federal judiciary ? are vacant, and the Senate approved only 60 of President Obama's court nominees in the last two years. That was the lowest total for a new president in four decades. In Roberts' year-end report on the federal courts, he said that this "persistent problem has developed ?
NATIONAL
August 15, 2005 | Steven Bodzin, Times Staff Writer
House Majority Leader Tom DeLay (R-Texas) joined conservative church leaders Sunday to encourage evangelicals to help advance the nomination of Judge John G. Roberts Jr. to the Supreme Court. At a 90-minute Nashville service that featured religious and political leaders, DeLay said, "We're here to protect the court so it can keep protecting us."
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