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John G Jr Roberts

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August 4, 2005 | Richard A. Serrano, Times Staff Writer
Supreme Court nominee John G. Roberts Jr. worked behind the scenes for gay rights activists, and his legal expertise helped them persuade the Supreme Court to issue a landmark 1996 ruling protecting people from discrimination because of their sexual orientation. Then a lawyer specializing in appellate work, the conservative Roberts helped represent the gay rights activists as part of his law firm's pro bono work.
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July 1, 2007 | David G. Savage, Times Staff Writer
In what may signal a generational shift in power, new Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. led a confident conservative majority at the Supreme Court this year and moved the law to the right on abortion, religion, campaign funding and racial diversity. Working with a 5-4 majority, Roberts prevailed in nearly all the major cases.
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NATIONAL
July 20, 2005 | Warren Vieth, Edwin Chen and Mary Curtius, Times Staff Writers
President Bush on Tuesday named John G. Roberts Jr., a federal appellate judge, as his choice to fill the Supreme Court seat being vacated by Justice Sandra Day O'Connor, in a nomination expected to bolster the court's conservative faction if accepted by the Senate. Roberts, 50, argued conservative positions on abortion and other issues before the high court during his years as a lawyer for Republican administrations, but his two years of service on the U.S.
NATIONAL
July 14, 2006 | Sara Lin, Times Staff Writer
In a wide-ranging speech that touched on issues personal and professional, Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. said he wanted to improve relations between the courts and Congress to ensure the judiciary remained independent. The comments came during a talk Thursday before a packed ballroom of about 400 people at the 9th Circuit Judicial Conference in Huntington Beach.
NATIONAL
August 5, 2005 | Maura Reynolds, Times Staff Writer
Supporters and opponents of Supreme Court nominee John G. Roberts Jr. were caught off guard Thursday by news that he once had worked behind the scenes to help gay rights activists win a key case before the nation's highest court. Debate erupted on conservative and liberal websites, with partisans on both sides asking whether Roberts' assistance was an aberration from his conservative record or a sign that his views might be less ideological than commonly thought.
NATIONAL
August 19, 2005 | David G. Savage, Richard Simon and Henry Weinstein, Times Staff Writers
As a White House lawyer in the Reagan administration, John G. Roberts Jr. did not spend all of his time analyzing the great legal issues of the day. Instead, judging from the thousands of pages of his files that were released Thursday, the Supreme Court nominee spent much of his time acting as a gatekeeper and editor for the president. He repeatedly tried to keep President Reagan's friends from taking advantage of his office.
NATIONAL
August 6, 2005 | Maura Reynolds, Times Staff Writer
The Bush administration Friday issued a blanket rejection of Democratic requests for further documents connected to Supreme Court nominee John G. Roberts Jr., arguing it was "simply contrary to the public interest" to release the material. The letter from the Justice Department came in response to several Democratic requests, including one earlier Friday, seeking access to 16 case files from Roberts' service as deputy solicitor general in the administration of President George H.W. Bush.
NATIONAL
August 31, 2005 | Maura Reynolds, Times Staff Writer
A week before televised confirmation hearings on Supreme Court nominee John G. Roberts Jr., the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library said Tuesday that it had discovered a potentially large number of documents related to Roberts that had been inadvertently missed during previous searches of the nominee's files.
NATIONAL
July 22, 2005 | Janet Hook, Times Staff Writer
What happens when an army prepares for World War III -- and ends up in a border skirmish? That question looms for liberal groups that have been collecting millions of dollars and preparing for years for a scorched-earth battle over President Bush's first Supreme Court nominee. But now that Bush has chosen John G. Roberts Jr., a respected jurist with bipartisan ties in Washington's legal establishment, Senate Democrats do not seem as eager to go to war.
NATIONAL
July 22, 2005 | Maura Reynolds, Times Staff Writer
The group of maverick Democrats and Republicans who reached a truce in partisan warfare over judicial nominations this year decided Thursday that President Bush's nomination of John G. Roberts Jr. to the Supreme Court was not "extraordinary" enough to break that peace.
NATIONAL
May 22, 2006 | From the Associated Press
Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. said Sunday that he was seeking greater consensus on the Supreme Court, arguing that closer agreement among justices was likely if hot-button issues were decided on the "narrowest possible grounds." In a 15-minute address to Georgetown University law graduates, the 51-year-old chief justice -- the youngest in 200 years -- sketched a vision for leading a court bitterly divided on issues such as abortion, the death penalty and gay rights.
NATIONAL
March 8, 2006 | David G. Savage, Times Staff Writer
Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr., in less than six months as leader of the Supreme Court, has turned the famously quarrelsome justices, at least for now, into a surprisingly agreeable group that is becoming known for unanimous rulings. Monday's decision rejecting a free-speech challenge to having military recruiters on college campuses marked the ninth consecutive ruling in which all of the justices agreed.
NATIONAL
February 22, 2006 | David G. Savage, Times Staff Writer
The Supreme Court set the stage Tuesday for a major ruling on abortion by agreeing to decide whether Congress can outlaw what critics call "partial-birth" abortions through the second trimester of a pregnancy. The fate of a federal law, the first nationwide ban on an abortion procedure, is probably in the hands of President Bush's two new appointees: Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. and Justice Samuel A. Alito Jr.
NATIONAL
October 2, 2005 | David G. Savage, Times Staff Writer
The Supreme Court opens its term this week with a new chief justice, and facing a series of major cases on the "right to die," abortion, free speech and the death penalty. Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. will be sworn in Monday morning during a court ceremony and then take the center seat as the justices hear the first round of oral arguments. His first case might not prove memorable to him or to the law.
NATIONAL
September 30, 2005 | Maura Reynolds, Times Staff Writer
Hours after the Senate confirmed him overwhelmingly, John G. Roberts Jr. took the oath Thursday as the 17th chief justice of the United States. Now, President Bush must nominate someone to succeed retiring Justice Sandra Day O'Connor, a selection likely to determine the direction of the Roberts-led Supreme Court. On Monday, the court begins a new term. The 78-22 confirmation vote for Roberts, the first new appointee to the court in more than a decade, was a triumph for Bush.
NATIONAL
September 27, 2005 | Ronald Brownstein, Times Staff Writer
All but one of the five Senate Democrats viewed as possible 2008 presidential candidates have said they would vote against the confirmation of John G. Roberts Jr. as chief justice, underscoring the pressure on party leaders to combat President Bush. Both parties agree that Roberts is virtually certain to win confirmation later this week after a debate that began Monday. Three of the eight Democrats on the Senate Judiciary Committee, including the party's ranking member, Patrick J. Leahy (D-Vt.
NATIONAL
July 22, 2005 | Henry Weinstein, Times Staff Writer
Although much of the early sparring over Supreme Court nominee John G. Roberts Jr. has focused on how he might vote on abortion, his biggest impact could be on cases involving business, which he has represented frequently in his legal career. While in private practice, Roberts represented numerous companies -- Chrysler Corp., Litton Systems, Toyota Motor Corp., WellPoint Health Networks and NBC -- as well as the U.S. Chamber of Commerce and trade associations for the mining and beer industries.
NATIONAL
July 20, 2005 | Ronald Brownstein, Times Staff Writer
With the nomination Tuesday of John G. Roberts Jr. to the Supreme Court, President Bush reaffirmed his commitment to a bold-stroke presidency -- but also signaled an uncharacteristic interest in reducing his exposure to political risk. Bush repeatedly has shown a willingness to accept pitched political battles as the price of pursuing dramatic change.
NATIONAL
September 18, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
Campaigning for reelection, New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg has broken with fellow Republicans and opposed President Bush's choice for chief justice of the Supreme Court. Bloomberg said he could not support nominee John G. Roberts Jr. because the judge had failed to indicate whether he accepted the Roe vs. Wade abortion ruling as "settled law." He said Roberts had not shown "a commitment to protect a woman's right to choose."
NATIONAL
September 16, 2005 | David G. Savage and Richard B. Schmitt, Times Staff Writers
"I'm not an ideologue," John G. Roberts Jr. told the Senate Judiciary Committee on Thursday. And with that comment, he aptly summarized the case he made for himself during four days of hearings on his nomination as the Supreme Court's chief justice. Based on his self-portrait, the Roberts court would not be the place where those in search of new legal rights and protections would find them. Nor, however, would the high court under his leadership press a conservative counter-revolution.
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