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John G Smale

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 22, 2011 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
John G. Smale, a self-effacing but tenacious executive whose brand-management savvy led him to the top of consumer-products giant Procter & Gamble before becoming chairman of General Motors and spearheading efforts to halt its slide toward bankruptcy, died Saturday at his home in Cincinnati. He was 84. The cause was complications from pulmonary fibrosis, a lung disease, said Paul Fox, a Procter & Gamble spokesman. Smale served as P&G's chief executive officer from 1981 to 1990 in a career that spanned 43 years at the Cincinnati-based company.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 22, 2011 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
John G. Smale, a self-effacing but tenacious executive whose brand-management savvy led him to the top of consumer-products giant Procter & Gamble before becoming chairman of General Motors and spearheading efforts to halt its slide toward bankruptcy, died Saturday at his home in Cincinnati. He was 84. The cause was complications from pulmonary fibrosis, a lung disease, said Paul Fox, a Procter & Gamble spokesman. Smale served as P&G's chief executive officer from 1981 to 1990 in a career that spanned 43 years at the Cincinnati-based company.
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BUSINESS
October 27, 1992 | LINDA GRANT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sources close to General Motors Corp. said Monday that the board of directors' putsch against Robert C. Stempel's management, led by John G. Smale, 65, retired chairman of Procter & Gamble, is strongly supported by directors Dennis Weatherstone, 61, chairman of the New York bank J. P. Morgan & Co., and Thomas H. Wyman, 62, former chairman of CBS Inc. J. Willard Marriott Jr., 60, chairman of Marriott Corp.
NEWS
November 3, 1992 | AMY HARMON and DONALD WOUTAT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In what is seen as a watershed for U.S. industry, General Motors Corp.'s board of directors on Monday installed one of its own atop the company, slashed the dividend by half, swept out four top executives and anointed new leadership at the ailing automotive giant. The action marked a dramatic bid to resuscitate once-mighty GM--bellwether of the nation's industrial economy that has been driven into a financial morass by inefficiency and deeply entrenched bureaucracy.
NEWS
November 3, 1992 | AMY HARMON and DONALD WOUTAT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In what is seen as a watershed for U.S. industry, General Motors Corp.'s board of directors on Monday installed one of its own atop the company, slashed the dividend by half, swept out four top executives and anointed new leadership at the ailing automotive giant. The action marked a dramatic bid to resuscitate once-mighty GM--bellwether of the nation's industrial economy that has been driven into a financial morass by inefficiency and deeply entrenched bureaucracy.
BUSINESS
October 27, 1992 | AMY HARMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The forced resignation of General Motors Corp. Chairman Robert C. Stempel has cleared the way for a new management team to carry out the radical transformation widely viewed as essential for the auto maker's survival. The two men most likely to lead the accelerated effort to turn around the company, analysts said Monday, are John G. Smale and John F. Smith Jr., both of whom have been working largely behind the scenes to transform the company since April.
NEWS
October 23, 1992 | DONALD WOUTAT and AMY HARMON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The world's largest company seemed suspended in midair Thursday, the center of a maelstrom stirred by its own struggle for recovery in a climate of confusion, anger, finger-pointing and plummeting morale. The storm is the argument over how to reinvent General Motors Corp., a bellwether of American competitiveness fallen on very hard times, and who should be in charge. This week, it is not clear whether anyone is. At the storm's eye is Robert C.
BUSINESS
April 9, 1992
The article "Kohl Invites Waldheim to Lunch, Stirs Anger" (March 27) alleges that Austrian President Waldheim concealed his Nazi past. The reference to a Nazi past implies membership and support for the NSDAP (Nazi party) and Nazi doctrine. Compare this to the NS documents that describe Waldheim as being "particularly hateful against our movement" and to be considered an unreliable person.
BUSINESS
January 6, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
GM Disbands Executive Committee: General Motors Corp. disbanded the executive committee of its board, one of several moves that reflect the new role accorded Chairman John G. Smale. The company also pared the number of seats on its board and replaced its management committee with a new president's council, according to GM officials and an amended copy of GM's corporate bylaws filed with the SEC.
BUSINESS
October 9, 1985
President John G. Smale told shareholders at the annual meeting that net earnings for the first quarter ended Sept. 30 will be ahead of the year-earlier quarter's $223 million. Smale characterized the last two years as a period of investment in new products and said the investment is now paying off in the diaper, toothpaste and laundry detergent segments. He added that the company's recent $1.
BUSINESS
October 27, 1992 | LINDA GRANT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sources close to General Motors Corp. said Monday that the board of directors' putsch against Robert C. Stempel's management, led by John G. Smale, 65, retired chairman of Procter & Gamble, is strongly supported by directors Dennis Weatherstone, 61, chairman of the New York bank J. P. Morgan & Co., and Thomas H. Wyman, 62, former chairman of CBS Inc. J. Willard Marriott Jr., 60, chairman of Marriott Corp.
BUSINESS
October 27, 1992 | AMY HARMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The forced resignation of General Motors Corp. Chairman Robert C. Stempel has cleared the way for a new management team to carry out the radical transformation widely viewed as essential for the auto maker's survival. The two men most likely to lead the accelerated effort to turn around the company, analysts said Monday, are John G. Smale and John F. Smith Jr., both of whom have been working largely behind the scenes to transform the company since April.
NEWS
October 23, 1992 | DONALD WOUTAT and AMY HARMON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The world's largest company seemed suspended in midair Thursday, the center of a maelstrom stirred by its own struggle for recovery in a climate of confusion, anger, finger-pointing and plummeting morale. The storm is the argument over how to reinvent General Motors Corp., a bellwether of American competitiveness fallen on very hard times, and who should be in charge. This week, it is not clear whether anyone is. At the storm's eye is Robert C.
BUSINESS
April 9, 1992
The article "Kohl Invites Waldheim to Lunch, Stirs Anger" (March 27) alleges that Austrian President Waldheim concealed his Nazi past. The reference to a Nazi past implies membership and support for the NSDAP (Nazi party) and Nazi doctrine. Compare this to the NS documents that describe Waldheim as being "particularly hateful against our movement" and to be considered an unreliable person.
BUSINESS
October 27, 1992 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS
The tenures of GM's past two chairmen were marked by declining market share, record losses and extensive plant closings and layoffs. GM under Roger B. Smith, chairman, 1981-1990: * Modernized its aging manufacturing and technological base. * Introduced the Saturn to compete with the Japanese. * Set an industry record by earning $4.86 billion in 1988, but little was contributed by the ailing U.S. car operations. * Lost 12% market share because of weak products.
BUSINESS
August 11, 1987 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS, Times Staff Writer
Procter & Gamble on Monday reported a net loss of $324 million for the three months ended June 30 because of the expected costs of a sweeping restructuring of the consumer products giant. The previously announced $805-million reserve to pay for P&G's restructuring reduced earnings by $459 million, resulting in the company's first quarterly loss since 1949, P&G spokeswoman Sydney L. McHugh said. In the same period last year, P&G earned $127 million. Net sales for the quarter rose 7% to $4.
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