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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 6, 1998
John Gary, 65, singing star who had his own television show. Gary performed with Ken Murray's "Blackouts" in Hollywood before he temporarily lost his voice. After returning from the Marines, he became a regular on "Don McNeill's Breakfast Club" in Chicago, a popular early morning network radio show. After his first album, "Catch a Rising Star," Gary signed a contract with RCA Records. He later appeared frequently on television's "Ed Sullivan Show" and "Tonight Show."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 6, 1998
John Gary, 65, singing star who had his own television show. Gary performed with Ken Murray's "Blackouts" in Hollywood before he temporarily lost his voice. After returning from the Marines, he became a regular on "Don McNeill's Breakfast Club" in Chicago, a popular early morning network radio show. After his first album, "Catch a Rising Star," Gary signed a contract with RCA Records. He later appeared frequently on television's "Ed Sullivan Show" and "Tonight Show."
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 7, 1991 | STEVE HOCHMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Why me?" John Gary, like most people stricken with cancer, asked himself that question when an inoperable tumor was discovered in his second lumbar vertebrae in January and he was told he had perhaps between six months and two years to live. Now, though the prognosis is unchanged, he's asking "Why me?" again, but in a completely different light.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 6, 1993 | AL MARTINEZ
John Gary was singing "Danny Boy," an emotional Irish ballad about war and loss that can reduce strong men to tears. His rich tenor voice lay over Maldonado's restaurant like a blanket of silk. No one spoke. No one moved. Magic was in the air. Delivered with even a minimum of skill, the song commands respect, but not like this. The intensity of concentration was more than a tribute to the tune or to the quality of Gary's voice. It was acknowledgment of a miracle.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 6, 1993 | AL MARTINEZ
John Gary was singing "Danny Boy," an emotional Irish ballad about war and loss that can reduce strong men to tears. His rich tenor voice lay over Maldonado's restaurant like a blanket of silk. No one spoke. No one moved. Magic was in the air. Delivered with even a minimum of skill, the song commands respect, but not like this. The intensity of concentration was more than a tribute to the tune or to the quality of Gary's voice. It was acknowledgment of a miracle.
OPINION
August 26, 2012 | By Cary Schneider and Sue Horton
" There are two sides to every issue: One side is right and the other is wrong, but the middle is always evil. " - Ayn Rand's hero John Galt speaking in "Atlas Shrugged" Ayn Rand's novel "Atlas Shrugged" has polarized opinion for more than 50 years. Its fans - including, until recently, vice presidential candidate Paul Ryan - applaud the book's celebration of rugged individualism and no-holds-barred capitalism. Its critics dismiss it as heartless, simplistic and elitist. In the novel, many of the nation's most brilliant and innovative entrepreneurs and business leaders have disappeared, leaving the nation in chaos.
BUSINESS
May 11, 1997 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Robert Levine knows all the stories. The gray-haired man talking with his wife over in the corner is a mob lawyer from the Midwest. The stout, mustachioed gentleman opposite him is a Mexican drug lord holding court with his extended family, complete with mournful wife, bored-looking daughter and solicitous son-in-law. Scattered about elsewhere in the linoleum-tiled waiting room on visiting day in the U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 25, 2005 | From Times Staff Reports
A fishing boat captain pleaded guilty Monday to shooting at sea lions while his boat was anchored off Catalina Island. John Gary Woodrum, 38, of Harbor City admitted firing a .22-caliber rifle at the sea lions on two occasions last fall. He faces a possible maximum sentence of two years in prison for misdemeanor violations of the federal Marine Mammal Protection Act.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 2012 | By Robert Abele
Raw, unsettling and mesmerizing, the once-thought-lost Australian classic from 1971 "Wake in Fright" has been restored, and this grimly propulsive work, often cited as auguring the continent's arrival as a cinema powerhouse, merits attention. As charged as a nightmare, the adaptation of Kenneth Cook's novel chronicles the lost weekend of a young, soft-featured British schoolteacher named John Grant (Gary Bond) stuck - willfully or not, it could be argued - in "The Yabba," an Outback mining town of hard men who take seriously their entreaties for you to join them in drink after drink.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 2005 | From Times Staff Reports
A charter boat captain was sentenced in Los Angeles federal court Thursday to two months in prison for firing a rifle at sea lions off the coast of Santa Catalina Island last fall. United States District Judge John F. Walter also ordered John Gary Woodrum, 38, to pay a $5,000 fine, serve one year of probation and perform 250 hours of community service at the Marine Mammal Care Center at Ft. MacArthur in San Pedro.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 7, 1991 | STEVE HOCHMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Why me?" John Gary, like most people stricken with cancer, asked himself that question when an inoperable tumor was discovered in his second lumbar vertebrae in January and he was told he had perhaps between six months and two years to live. Now, though the prognosis is unchanged, he's asking "Why me?" again, but in a completely different light.
BUSINESS
May 9, 1989 | From Associated Press
Working women take about one more sick day a year than men, the National Center for Health Statistics reported in a new study Monday. Women averaged 5.5 lost work days a year, compared to 4.3 for men, in the analysis covering 1983 through 1985. John Gary Collins, one of the authors, declined to speculate on reasons for the difference, saying "there could be many possibilities." He said comparative figures for men and women, which the National Center for Health Statistics had not collected before, were included in its new study because women now comprise such a large portion of the work force.
BUSINESS
May 8, 1989 | From Times wire services
Working women take about one more sick day per year than men, the National Center for Health Statistics reported in a new study today. Women averaged 5.5 lost work days per year, compared to 4.3 missed days for men, in the analysis covering 1983 through 1985. John Gary Collins, one of the authors, declined to speculate on reasons for the difference, saying "there could be many possibilities." He said that comparative figures for men and women, which the National Center for Health Statistics had not collected before, were included in its new study because women now make up such a large portion of the work force.
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