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John Gately Downey

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 6, 2000 | Cecilia Rasmussen
He was an Irish immigrant who saved Los Angeles, California and, just maybe, the country itself. Along the way, he found time to create three institutions that decisively shaped L.A.'s future: its first bank, mall and suburb. Yet today John Gately Downey--a pharmacist-turned-governor-turned real estate mogul--is probably best remembered, if at all, for lending his name to a bedroom community southeast of downtown.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 6, 2000 | Cecilia Rasmussen
He was an Irish immigrant who saved Los Angeles, California and, just maybe, the country itself. Along the way, he found time to create three institutions that decisively shaped L.A.'s future: its first bank, mall and suburb. Yet today John Gately Downey--a pharmacist-turned-governor-turned real estate mogul--is probably best remembered, if at all, for lending his name to a bedroom community southeast of downtown.
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BUSINESS
June 16, 1999 | JAMES FLANIGAN
The city of Downey is taking a firm stance and a long-term view about redevelopment of its historic asset, the 160-acre factory site where Apollo space capsules and space shuttles were built. Downey wants to make sure that manufacturing companies, paying good wages, get to be the new residents of the property. "Industries paying wages that allow the workers to buy houses here in Downey" is how City Manager Jerry Caton describes desired businesses.
NEWS
December 19, 1991 | LORNA FERNANDES
Downey, which began as an agricultural town 118 years ago, is celebrating its 35th anniversary of incorporation. With a population of 91,444, the city is located in the center of the Los Angeles Basin, 12 miles southeast of downtown Los Angeles. Downey remains one of the more prosperous Southeast cities with large numbers of its residents in middle and high-income groups, according to the 1990 census.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 1, 2007 | Cecilia Rasmussen, Times Staff Writer
City names' origins are as diverse as the communities themselves. Some are traceable to Native American or Spanish words, others to local natural attributes. A few are whimsical, others puzzling. Here's how some of Los Angeles County's 88 cities got their names, along with the years they incorporated: Carson (1968) This area was part of Rancho San Pedro, one of the few Spanish land grants to remain in the same family for generations.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 4, 2001 | PATRICIA WARD BIEDERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It made no sense to Irish Americans Jim McMahon and Bill Robertson. Why did Jewish Americans have the Skirball Cultural Center, black Angelenos the California African American Museum in Exposition Park and Japanese Americans a museum in Little Tokyo, while the estimated 1 million Irish Americans in Los Angeles had no museum or major cultural center? "Everybody has a center except the Irish," said McMahon, 50, a native of Northern Ireland who became an American citizen in July.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 26, 1989 | Cecilia Rasmussen, Times Researcher
Los Angeles was the first city in the county to incorporate--in 1850--with Diamond Bar trailing 139 years later, to become the 86th city earlier this year. Many of the communities were carved out of the large ranchos that dominated the area in the early 19th Century. Here is how each community was named and the date of its incorporation. Agoura Hills (1982)--In 1924 the town was called Independent Acres, but the name was later changed to Picture City in honor of Paramount Picture Corp.
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