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John Gatins

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ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 2005 | Carina Chocano, Times Staff Writer
It should come as no surprise that dreams do in fact come true in "Dreamer: Inspired by a True Story," a classic underfilly tale about a girl, her horse and the family farm they bet against when dad Ben (Kurt Russell) accepts an injured racehorse as partial severance after getting himself fired from his job as a horse trainer.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 2012 | By Nicole Sperling, Los Angeles Times
The bar at the Century Plaza Hotel is about the last place you'd think John Gatins would want to revisit. It's where the now successful screenwriter worked when he was a much younger - and much different - person. It was a time in his life when he was a struggling actor in the throes of a crippling addiction to drugs and alcohol. Living fast and reckless, Gatins in his early 20s was described by his friends as a "charming ne'er-do-well," openly flirting with death. "I just came unglued.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 2005 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN
JOHN GATINS was struggling to get his new DreamWorks film, "Dreamer," made when he heard good news. If the writer-director could somehow get Dakota Fanning to play the key role of a girl who falls in love with a promising filly whose career has been derailed by a broken leg, the movie would get a greenlight. Desperate to keep the movie alive, he phoned Fanning's agent and persuaded her to let him stop by and make his pitch in person.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 2005 | Carina Chocano, Times Staff Writer
It should come as no surprise that dreams do in fact come true in "Dreamer: Inspired by a True Story," a classic underfilly tale about a girl, her horse and the family farm they bet against when dad Ben (Kurt Russell) accepts an injured racehorse as partial severance after getting himself fired from his job as a horse trainer.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 2012 | By Nicole Sperling, Los Angeles Times
The bar at the Century Plaza Hotel is about the last place you'd think John Gatins would want to revisit. It's where the now successful screenwriter worked when he was a much younger - and much different - person. It was a time in his life when he was a struggling actor in the throes of a crippling addiction to drugs and alcohol. Living fast and reckless, Gatins in his early 20s was described by his friends as a "charming ne'er-do-well," openly flirting with death. "I just came unglued.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 1996 | DON SHIRLEY
George F. Walker's one-act "Tough!" at the Coast Playhouse is a bitter torrent of tough-minded talk among three young adults who are quickly learning that being grown-up isn't what it was cracked up to be. Tina (Nina-Marie Gardner) confronts her boyfriend Bobby (John Gatins) in a park with the bulletin that he's been seen playing around, but what's really on her mind is that she's pregnant.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 14, 2001 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Hardball," a surefire heart-tugger made with skill and judgment, affords Keanu Reeves a career high point as a chronic gambler who finds unexpected redemption in coaching a team of adolescent baseball players in a bleak and dangerous Chicago ghetto housing project. Inspired by Daniel Coyle's memoir "Hardball: A Season in the Projects," this endearing film strikes an all-crucial consistent balance between grit and sentiment.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 24, 2001 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Along with vacationers, Cape Cod in summertime draws college baseball all-stars who have won a coveted spot on the more-than-a-century-old Cape Cod League--and that in turn attracts pro scouts. In the overly complicated and often heavy-handed "Summer Catch," Freddie Prinze Jr.'s Ryan Dunne has more pressure on him than others who have made the league. First of all, he's the first local boy to make it within memory.
SPORTS
October 12, 2005 | Larry Stewart, Times Staff Writer
Hard to imagine, but Tennessee once recorded 17 consecutive regular-season shutouts in football. Today is the 65th anniversary of No. 17, against Tennessee Chattanooga. The streak also started against Tennessee Chattanooga, on Nov. 5, 1938. The Volunteers had a perfect 1939 season -- they were 10-0 and gave up no points. But they lost to the USC Trojans, 14-0, in the Rose Bowl game. USC went into the game 7-0-2.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 17, 2013 | By Mark Olsen
 The Writers Guild of America gave its top prizes to Chris Terrio for “Argo” for adapted screenplay and Mark Boal for “Zero Dark Thirty” for original screenplay on Sunday night in a bicoastal awards ceremony held simultaneously in Los Angeles and New York City. In the cruel algebra of awards season, where x-award plus y-award increases the perceived likelihood of final Oscar victory, Sunday night's WGA award is the latest sign that Hollywood had gone all in on “Argo,” with the diminishing likelihood of a last stand for “Lincoln.”   Other nominated screenplays in the adaptation category were Tony Kushner's “Lincoln,” David Magee's “Life of Pi,” Stephen Chbosky's “The Perks of Being a Wallflower,” and David O. Russell's “Silver Linings Playbook.” Of the nominees, only Chbosky was not nominated for the Oscar as well.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 2005 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN
JOHN GATINS was struggling to get his new DreamWorks film, "Dreamer," made when he heard good news. If the writer-director could somehow get Dakota Fanning to play the key role of a girl who falls in love with a promising filly whose career has been derailed by a broken leg, the movie would get a greenlight. Desperate to keep the movie alive, he phoned Fanning's agent and persuaded her to let him stop by and make his pitch in person.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 5, 2013 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
The scripts of "Zero Dark Thirty," "Lincoln" and "Silver Linings Playbook" are among the nominees for Writers Guild of America Awards for outstanding achievement in writing for the screen in 2012. Nominees announced Friday in the original screenplay category are John Gatins for "Flight," Rian Johnson for "Looper," Paul Thomas Anderson for "The Master," Wes Anderson and Roman Coppola for "Moonrise Kingdom" and Mark Boal for "Zero Dark Thirty. " "It's a huge honor to be put in such heady company of fellow writers," Johnson said in a statement.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 2012 | By Oliver Gettell
Is there anything Denzel Washington can't do? As an actor, he's tackled such diverse roles as a level-headed submarine officer, a homophobic lawyer, a crooked narcotics cop and a number of real-life figures, including Malcolm X and Rubin "Hurricane" Carter. Now in "Flight," the first live-action film directed by Robert Zemeckis in more than a decade, Washington stars as Whip Whitaker, a substance-abusing airline pilot who pulls off a miraculous crash-landing but faces dire consequences for flying drunk.
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