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John Gaughan

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MAGAZINE
January 5, 2003 | SONDRA FARRELL BAZROD
When master illusionist John Gaughan is not making a rock star materialize on a throne before frenzied crowds, he delights in collecting and restoring devices from magic eras past, including Harry Houdini's water torture cell from 1913. "They still fool and entertain audiences," says Gaughan, who loaned some of his antique marvels to the "Devices of Wonder" exhibit that ran at the Getty Museum last year.
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MAGAZINE
January 5, 2003 | SONDRA FARRELL BAZROD
When master illusionist John Gaughan is not making a rock star materialize on a throne before frenzied crowds, he delights in collecting and restoring devices from magic eras past, including Harry Houdini's water torture cell from 1913. "They still fool and entertain audiences," says Gaughan, who loaned some of his antique marvels to the "Devices of Wonder" exhibit that ran at the Getty Museum last year.
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NEWS
September 20, 1985 | Associated Press
President Reagan will nominate John Gaughan, deputy assistant transportation secretary for governmental affairs, to be the administrator of the Transportation Department's Maritime Administration, the White House said Thursday.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 17, 1994
Regarding "Reality Bites Back," David Kronke's interview with "Forrest Gump" director Robert Zemeckis (July 3): It was intriguing to discover Zemeckis' dubiety about the ethics of image manipulation. Although he enjoys the growing vocabulary of illusion it affords him for telling his film stories, his conscience nags him to equivocate: "These techniques are gonna be used to do wonderful things, and they'll probably be used to do abusive things. I think you just have to be a smart enough person to not take everything at face value.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 20, 1985 | RICHARD BUFFUM
A largely unrecognized part of the late Orson Welles' life was a deep and abiding dedication to the art of theatrical conjuring. "Welles loved magic more than anything--his films, the stage, anything," said John Gaughan, who had just completed building about 40% of the illusions that were to be used in a projected television magic special.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 23, 1997 | NANCY CHURNIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Everybody's a critic, but you don't know opinionated until you've been to a show with my 6-year-old. During opening night of the touring "Beauty and the Beast," making its only 1997 California stop through July 13 at the San Diego Civic Theatre, Sam kept urging me to clap louder, whispering insistently after a particularly mesmerizing special effect, "This is good. This is very good. Write that down!"
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 13, 1986 | Richard Buffum
Dr. Eugene Elliott and I were discussing the restoration of the world's oldest tools the other day over lunch. About 40% of his surgical practice is devoted to repairing people's hands because of functional breakdowns owing to disease or injury. Although Elliott employs the most advanced electronic devices in his work, he was amused (and gratified) by the fact that he repairs those most ancient of mechanical devices--human hands.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 1995 | LAURIE WINER, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
Froufrou it may be at times, but "Disney's Beauty and the Beast," which opened Wednesday night at the Shubert Theatre, has a cast to die for and a smashing score. And Disney does not want you to forget who the producer is--the show always carries that cumbersome company brand in front of its title as well as in some of its theme-parkish effects and cheesy painted backdrops. But, make no mistake, "Beauty and the Beast" is at heart a Broadway musical, in the very best sense.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 2007 | John Horn, Times Staff Writer
THE Times Square rehearsal space is mostly bare, with only a door stoop mapped out on the otherwise empty stage. There eventually will be a minimal set, several lighting cues and a few sound effects and music. But when Chazz Palminteri launches the revival of his "A Bronx Tale" on Broadway, it will be almost all Palminteri and hardly anything else. When most little plays graduate from a 72-seat waiver house to a 947-seat auditorium on 48th Street, they collect all kinds of bells and whistles.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 2007 | By Patrice Roe, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
As exclusive gatherings go, this one was noteworthy, even by the high local standards set by A-list Hollywood, with attendees including a former acting director of the CIA, at least one prime-time TV star and half of Penn & Teller (the smaller, quieter half). That last guest is perhaps the one clue you need to figure out the subject of their mutual interest: magic. Or more specifically, the history of the art, as long-dead prestidigitators, illusionists and "miracle" workers were resurrected for the 10th Los Angeles Conference on Magic History, held Nov. 8-10 in North Hollywood.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 19, 2014 | By Marisa Gerber
Downtown Las Vegas knew him as the guy who wore wacky ties and kept his pockets stuffed with coupons for a free lunch at El Cortez Hotel and Casino. When he met someone new, he handed them a "fun book," as the vouchers are sometimes called, and introduced himself: Jackie - just Jackie - not Mr. Gaughan. A kingpin of the old, original part of Las Vegas known as Glitter Gulch, Gaughan at one point owned or had interest in about a quarter of downtown Las Vegas, including the Golden Nugget, Union Plaza and Las Vegas Club.
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