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John Gielgud

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 26, 2000
An era has closed with the death of the magnificent actor, John Gielgud (May 23). Among his limitless talents, he could express the dry British wit better than almost anyone. My favorite exchange of his was in the film "Murder on the Orient Express," in which he played a proper English butler. A bawdy Italian named Foscarelli notices that Gielgud's character is reading a book, about which Mr. F. asks: "Is it about sex?" Without batting an eye, Gielgud consults his watch and replies: "No, Mr. Foscarelli, it's about 10:30."
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 2013 | By Susan King
Richard Dreyfuss has a lot on his mind. And he's more than willing to share. Among his talking points: the beleaguered state of civics education and filmmaking today - most roles in new films are "stupid," he believes - studying at Oxford, directing John Gielgud and auditioning for Jack Nicholson's 1971 drama "Drive, He Said. " He has a story about that one. "I had gone out for one of the parts in 'Drive' and didn't get it, and I was all grumpy," said the 65-year-old Dreyfuss, who appeared trim and sprightly during a recent breakfast at a Brentwood hotel.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 13, 1985 | RODERICK MANN
For more than four years now, the most sought-after actor in Britain has not been O'Toole or Finney or Hopkins but an 81-year-old former Shakespearean star with the face of a prelate--Sir John Gielgud. Last year alone, he was involved in 10 projects--among them the movie "Plenty" with Meryl Streep, a Paul Masson wine commercial for which he is the supercilious huckster, and "Antigone" for the BBC.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 4, 2013 | Rebecca Trounson
Milo O'Shea, a versatile Dublin-born stage and screen actor known for his famously bristling, agile eyebrows and roles in such disparate films as "Ulysses," "Barbarella" and Franco Zeffirelli's "Romeo and Juliet," has died. He was 86. O'Shea, who also appeared in many popular television series, including "Cheers," "Frasier," "The West Wing" and "The Golden Girls," died Tuesday in New York after a short illness, according to Irish news accounts. Familiar both in starring and supporting roles, he appeared in numerous stage productions before coming to wider attention with his first leading screen role as Leopold Bloom in the 1967 adaptation of James Joyce's "Ulysses.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 2000 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Actors and their vocal coaches customarily refer to the voice as the Instrument, with the capital in place. So it is--although not all voices are created equal and some are blunt instruments, fine for crying "Charge" or "Save the Dauphin" but of limited range otherwise. Sir John Gielgud, who died Sunday at the age of 96, had the most perfect male vocal instrument of them all, and no one who heard it on stage or on screen will likely ever forget it.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 27, 1991 | DAVID GRITTEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"It's a kind of farewell," Sir John Gielgud is saying about his title role in Peter Greenaway's new film "Prospero's Books." "Doing Prospero was a kind of culmination for me, which is, of course, why I wanted to do it. It's the only Shakespearean role I'm still the right age to play. There is Lear, of course, but Olivier did Lear and one doesn't want to compete with Olivier."
NEWS
May 23, 2000 | From a Times Staff Writer
Sir John Gielgud, the last of the great trinity of British actors who dominated the theatrical world for much of the 20th century, has died. Gielgud, 96, died Sunday at his home near Aylesbury in Buckinghamshire west of London, Laurence Evans, his former agent, announced Monday.
BOOKS
July 11, 2004 | Gavin Lambert, Gavin Lambert is the author of many books, including "Natalie Wood: A Life," "Nazimova" and "On Cukor."
British theater enjoyed a golden age of actors from 1930 through the 1950s. (The only 18-karat playwright during those years was Noel Coward, who starred in many of his own plays and wrote the music for his musicals. And although George Bernard Shaw was still alive, his decline had begun after "The Apple Cart" in 1929.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 15, 2012 | By Scott Timberg, Special to the Los Angeles Times
While getting started for her debut in Culture Monster's Influences column, brassy Broadway veteran Elaine Stritch, 87, wanted to make one thing clear: She's never been influenced by anyone. "I am not influenced by other human beings," she says. "But I am inspired. If I see a great performance on television, onstage, in the movies, I go to work the next day with a renewed energy and less fear. These great artists take me out of my life and make me want to go there. But I never imitated anyone.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 15, 2012 | By Scott Timberg, Special to the Los Angeles Times
While getting started for her debut in Culture Monster's Influences column, brassy Broadway veteran Elaine Stritch, 87, wanted to make one thing clear: She's never been influenced by anyone. "I am not influenced by other human beings," she says. "But I am inspired. If I see a great performance on television, onstage, in the movies, I go to work the next day with a renewed energy and less fear. These great artists take me out of my life and make me want to go there. But I never imitated anyone.
BOOKS
July 11, 2004 | Gavin Lambert, Gavin Lambert is the author of many books, including "Natalie Wood: A Life," "Nazimova" and "On Cukor."
British theater enjoyed a golden age of actors from 1930 through the 1950s. (The only 18-karat playwright during those years was Noel Coward, who starred in many of his own plays and wrote the music for his musicals. And although George Bernard Shaw was still alive, his decline had begun after "The Apple Cart" in 1929.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 26, 2000
An era has closed with the death of the magnificent actor, John Gielgud (May 23). Among his limitless talents, he could express the dry British wit better than almost anyone. My favorite exchange of his was in the film "Murder on the Orient Express," in which he played a proper English butler. A bawdy Italian named Foscarelli notices that Gielgud's character is reading a book, about which Mr. F. asks: "Is it about sex?" Without batting an eye, Gielgud consults his watch and replies: "No, Mr. Foscarelli, it's about 10:30."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 2000 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Actors and their vocal coaches customarily refer to the voice as the Instrument, with the capital in place. So it is--although not all voices are created equal and some are blunt instruments, fine for crying "Charge" or "Save the Dauphin" but of limited range otherwise. Sir John Gielgud, who died Sunday at the age of 96, had the most perfect male vocal instrument of them all, and no one who heard it on stage or on screen will likely ever forget it.
NEWS
May 23, 2000 | From a Times Staff Writer
Sir John Gielgud, the last of the great trinity of British actors who dominated the theatrical world for much of the 20th century, has died. Gielgud, 96, died Sunday at his home near Aylesbury in Buckinghamshire west of London, Laurence Evans, his former agent, announced Monday.
BOOKS
November 15, 1992 | CHRIS GOODRICH
ACTING SHAKESPEARE by John Gielgud (Charles Scribner's Sons/A Robert Stewart Book: $20; 192 pp.). Fans of John Gielgud are likely to be disappointed with this volume, which doesn't add up to 200 pages despite being padded out with an extensive introduction (by frequent Gielgud collaborator John Miller) and four appendices. "Acting Shakespeare" has its charms nonetheless, and they derive almost entirely from the fact that Gielgud is such a pure representation of classic British acting.
BOOKS
November 15, 1992 | CHRIS GOODRICH
ACTING SHAKESPEARE by John Gielgud (Charles Scribner's Sons/A Robert Stewart Book: $20; 192 pp.). Fans of John Gielgud are likely to be disappointed with this volume, which doesn't add up to 200 pages despite being padded out with an extensive introduction (by frequent Gielgud collaborator John Miller) and four appendices. "Acting Shakespeare" has its charms nonetheless, and they derive almost entirely from the fact that Gielgud is such a pure representation of classic British acting.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 29, 1988 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, Times Arts Editor
On an autumn morning in 1946, John Gielgud, who was touring the country with his one-man show, "The Ages of Man," visited a large lecture class I was taking on Shakespeare, to talk a little about acting. In an ancient tweed jacket and baggy gray flannels and carrying a well-used one-volume Shakespeare that seemed to fall open to the soliloquys at Gielgud's slightest touch, Sir John began to recite. The book was a prop; he obviously had no need to refer to it at all.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 27, 1991 | DAVID GRITTEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"It's a kind of farewell," Sir John Gielgud is saying about his title role in Peter Greenaway's new film "Prospero's Books." "Doing Prospero was a kind of culmination for me, which is, of course, why I wanted to do it. It's the only Shakespearean role I'm still the right age to play. There is Lear, of course, but Olivier did Lear and one doesn't want to compete with Olivier."
ENTERTAINMENT
December 29, 1988 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, Times Arts Editor
On an autumn morning in 1946, John Gielgud, who was touring the country with his one-man show, "The Ages of Man," visited a large lecture class I was taking on Shakespeare, to talk a little about acting. In an ancient tweed jacket and baggy gray flannels and carrying a well-used one-volume Shakespeare that seemed to fall open to the soliloquys at Gielgud's slightest touch, Sir John began to recite. The book was a prop; he obviously had no need to refer to it at all.
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