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WORLD
March 10, 2013 | By Robyn Dixon
NAIROBI, Kenya -- As Kenya faced another disputed election Sunday, the country passed an important test: Despite outrage among many Kenyans over a result they saw as flawed, there was no major outbreak of violence. A massive deployment of security forces dispersed the few protests, earlier banned by Kenyan authorities. Kenyans were determined to break with the past, after tribal violence broke out in the wake of the disputed 2007 election, killing more than 1,000 people and tainting the country's reputation as an emerging democracy.
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WORLD
March 10, 2013 | By Robyn Dixon
NAIROBI, Kenya -- As Kenya faced another disputed election Sunday, the country passed an important test: Despite outrage among many Kenyans over a result they saw as flawed, there was no major outbreak of violence. A massive deployment of security forces dispersed the few protests, earlier banned by Kenyan authorities. Kenyans were determined to break with the past, after tribal violence broke out in the wake of the disputed 2007 election, killing more than 1,000 people and tainting the country's reputation as an emerging democracy.
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WORLD
February 8, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
Kenya's presidential anticorruption advisor quit without giving a reason, but friends said he was frustrated by a lack of government cooperation. John Githongo's move caused dismay among domestic and foreign officials. In the two years President Mwai Kibaki's government has been in power, Githongo had won support from international donors, who viewed him as a man of integrity amid corruption that some say has cost Kenya $1 billion in three years.
WORLD
February 9, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
The United States halted aid to Kenya's anti-graft agencies, saying the country lacked the will to fight corruption. U.S. Ambassador William Bellamy said Monday's resignation of top anti-graft advisor John Githongo and government inaction had called into question Nairobi's desire to solve the problem. Bellamy said the United States would withhold about $2.5 million.
WORLD
December 18, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
Investigators tracking the plunder of Kenya's resources during the regime of former President Daniel Arap Moi have discovered that $1 billion to $4 billion was sent abroad illegally. John Githongo, presidential secretary for ethics and governance, said investigations indicated large sums of money were taken from state-owned firms and from the illegal sale and transfer of government property and sent abroad. The government was trying to retrieve as much as possible, he said.
WORLD
June 30, 2002 | From Times Wire Services
NAIROBI, Kenya -- President Daniel Arap Moi has called for an extension of Kenya's current parliament session--and his final term in office--so that elections can be held under a constitution now being drafted. The move would delay elections planned for later this year, and analysts said it is designed to prolong Moi's 24-year rule beyond constitutional limits. But Moi, 77, one of Africa's longest-serving heads of state, pledged Saturday to retire after the next elections.
NEWS
December 13, 1998 | CHEGE MBITIRU, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Corruption is so refined in Kenya that no one noticed for a good while that police headquarters was paying salaries to dead officers. "People have been fiddling with the computers, and a lot of money has been lost," said Noah arap Too, director of the Criminal Investigation Department. "Investigations are going on." Too would not say when the scam was detected, but the East African Standard reported Nov.
NEWS
August 12, 1998 | ANN M. SIMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A growing anti-American sentiment in the Kenyan press has begun to worry U.S. officials, who say they will take steps to counter it. Daily newspapers here have begun to accuse Americans of rejecting the help of Kenyan volunteers and attending to their own wounded at the expense of Kenyans after last week's devastating bomb blast at the U.S. Embassy. Local media have also lambasted Washington for issuing an advisory urging U.S. citizens to stay away from this East African nation.
NEWS
October 6, 1998 | ANN M. SIMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Thousands of Kenyan teachers began an indefinite strike Monday that disrupted the beginning of national examinations for more than half a million students. The strike, protesting government refusal to implement pay raises awarded by a presidential committee last year, highlights growing worker dissatisfaction with a government that acknowledged earlier this year that it was broke.
OPINION
May 23, 2006 | Michael Holman, MICHAEL HOLMAN, former Africa editor of the Financial Times of London, is author of "Last Orders at Harrods."
POOR AFRICA! Seldom has debate about the fate of so many been shaped by so few from so far away -- and with so little effect. Increase aid, tackle health hazards and build model "development villages," argues Jeffrey Sachs, director of Columbia University's Earth Institute, and Africa can be pulled out of the poverty that makes life hell for six of every 10 of its 650 million people. Not so, retorts William Easterly, economics professor at New York University. We've tried that and failed.
NEWS
April 17, 2001 | ANN M. SIMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A series of political shake-ups including the departure of civil service boss Richard Leakey is casting doubt on Kenya's economic prospects and leading analysts to question the government's commitment to reform. The renowned paleontologist, son of white colonial settlers, was head of a "dream team" recruited from the private sector to clean up Kenya's notoriously corrupt and inefficient civil service and prepare state-owned companies for privatization.
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