Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJohn Glines
IN THE NEWS

John Glines

MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 1989 | JANICE ARKATOV
On June 5, 1983, John Glines accepted a best play Tony Award for his production of Harvey Fierstein's "Torch Song Trilogy." In his nationally televised speech, the producer thanked everyone who'd been a part of the show--including his then-partner and lover Lawrence Lane. At the end of the heady evening, Fierstein's limo deposited Glines in front of his Brooklyn apartment, where cheering neighbors had festooned the building with a banner and streamers.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 1989 | JANICE ARKATOV
On June 5, 1983, John Glines accepted a best play Tony Award for his production of Harvey Fierstein's "Torch Song Trilogy." In his nationally televised speech, the producer thanked everyone who'd been a part of the show--including his then-partner and lover Lawrence Lane. At the end of the heady evening, Fierstein's limo deposited Glines in front of his Brooklyn apartment, where cheering neighbors had festooned the building with a banner and streamers.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
March 24, 1989 | SYLVIE DRAKE, Times Theater Writer
John Glines' "On Tina Tuna Walk" that opened Thursday night at the Callboard Theatre in West Hollywood sounds like specialty sushi or stir-fried tuna. It is neither. Call it specialty theater. The name refers to one of the walkways in the Pines on Fire Island, an overtly gay community, and the comedy that follows is not "John Loves Mary," but Michael loves Paul. Comedy requires complications.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 1989 | SYLVIE DRAKE
John Glines' "On Tina Tuna Walk" at the Callboard sounds like specialty sushi or stir-fried tuna. It is neither. Call it specialty theater. The name refers to one of the walkways in the Pines on Fire Island, an overtly gay community, and the comedy that follows is not "John Loves Mary," but Michael loves Paul. Comedy requires complications.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 7, 1990 | RAY LOYND
Neither New York nor Los Angeles boasts a gay and lesbian theater company that has the history and the clout to qualify as a cultural force. That's left to San Francisco. The largest operation and, by all accounts, the most successful gay and lesbian company in the country is Theatre Rhinoceros in San Francisco's Mission district. Work produced there is more professional and polished than at L.A.'s only exclusively gay and lesbian theater, the Celebration.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 1986 | HERMAN WONG, Times Staff Writer
Barbara Van Holt remembers the day she became incurably stage-struck. A mere tot of 5 living in Santa Ana, she had just seen a World War II movie that starred a gallant, little Margaret O'Brien. "That was 'Journey for Margaret,' all about English war waifs. O'Brien and I were the same age. When I saw her, I knew I had to be an actress, too," recalled Van Holt, a drama teacher at Estancia High School in Costa Mesa. "I know that was pretty cheeky of me.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 1985 | SYLVIE DRAKE, Times Staff Writer
It's true. Rumors that New York's hit play "As Is" might show up in Los Angeles before the end of the year, have been quelled by producer John Glines. Contacted early Wednesday in New York, Glines confirmed that negotiations are going on with James A. Doolittle to bring the William Hoffman play about AIDS to the Doolittle Theatre (formerly the Huntington Hartford) the first week in September. "We're talking," Glines said. "We very much hope to do so."
NEWS
November 7, 1986 | LYNN SIMROSS, Lynn Simross
Taking a cue from the long-established practice of selling Christmas and Easter seals to raise money, Broadway producer John Glines has come up with a new seal, STAMP OUT AIDS, to benefit AIDS organizations across the country. A set of six stamps sells for $1. "I wanted to create an affordable way for everyone to contribute," said Glines, producer of the Tony Award-winning "Torch Song Trilogy." "This way, for just a dollar, everyone can help.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 14, 1985 | BARBARA ISENBERG
Broadway shows often seem to journey West by covered wagon: "My One and Only" opened at the Ahmanson Theatre Friday about 26 months after it opened on Broadway. "The Tap Dance Kid," due at the Pantages in September, will have taken 21 months to get here. "Cats," now at the Shubert, took 27 months. Three years will have elapsed from the Broadway openings of "Foxfire" and " 'night, Mother" to their scheduled openings here next November and March, respectively. What takes so long?
Los Angeles Times Articles
|