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John Glore

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ENTERTAINMENT
October 27, 1997 | JAN HERMAN
If unproduced plays were sheep, South Coast Repertory's literary manager would be a shepherd. He has tended flocks of scripts over the last 13 years, helping the county's only professional resident theater earn a national reputation for bringing new plays to market. The job, though hardly pastoral, demands a shepherd's devotion, with its all-consuming hours. And that goes double for a literary manager who also is a playwright with ambitions for getting his work produced.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 2011 | By Karen Wada, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Octavio Solis and Adam Gwon met six years ago in a New York workshop on musical theater, where they were assigned to write a song together. Solis, a Texas-born Mexican American playwright in his early 50s, and Gwon, a Chinese-American Jewish composer and lyricist in his early 30s, hit it off and decided to turn that song into a show. "Cloudlands," the chamber musical that resulted, will receive its first public reading Sunday at South Coast Repertory's 14th annual Pacific Playwrights Festival.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 2010 | By Karen Wada
Eight years ago, Julia Cho came to South Coast Repertory for the first time. She was a novice author, still in grad school, and excited to have her play, "99 Histories," read at the Pacific Playwrights Festival. Her visit was "amazing," she recalls. "I couldn't believe they were going to fly me to Costa Mesa from New York and put me up in a hotel, let alone put on my play." The experience also proved to be "a little intimidating," she says. "I was glad to be there, but I wasn't sure I belonged with all the older, more established playwrights."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 1989 | LYNNE HEFFLEY
Good children's plays are hard to come by. That's one reason you see so many Snow Whites and Cinderellas treading the boards. Last spring, though, South Coast Repertory asked its own literary manager, John Glore, to write a play for the Young Conservatory Players, 10-to-17-year-old members of SCR's youth theater training program who put on several shows a year. The result--Glore's refreshingly different "Wind of a Thousand Tales," in which a pragmatic little girl named Kimberly-Kay discovered her own imagination by taking a magical journey through three folk tales--was one of the Players' finest offerings.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 2010 | By Karen Wada
Eight years ago, Julia Cho came to South Coast Repertory for the first time. She was a novice author, still in grad school, and excited to have her play, "99 Histories," read at the Pacific Playwrights Festival. Her visit was "amazing," she recalls. "I couldn't believe they were going to fly me to Costa Mesa from New York and put me up in a hotel, let alone put on my play." The experience also proved to be "a little intimidating," she says. "I was glad to be there, but I wasn't sure I belonged with all the older, more established playwrights."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 2011 | By Karen Wada, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Octavio Solis and Adam Gwon met six years ago in a New York workshop on musical theater, where they were assigned to write a song together. Solis, a Texas-born Mexican American playwright in his early 50s, and Gwon, a Chinese-American Jewish composer and lyricist in his early 30s, hit it off and decided to turn that song into a show. "Cloudlands," the chamber musical that resulted, will receive its first public reading Sunday at South Coast Repertory's 14th annual Pacific Playwrights Festival.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 31, 1999 | MICHAEL PHILLIPS, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
John Glore's new comedy "On the Jump" makes few demands on an audience. Chiefly it demands to be described by way of the paradox--"mildly madcap," for example. It's like a Preston Sturges farce played at half-speed; you want it to really take off, to send its characters colliding, yet there's a fogged, dreamy quality to Glore's writing. Sometimes it's affecting. Other times, it's simply at odds with the narrative devices employed.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 1999 | JAN BRESLAUER, Jan Breslauer is a regular contributor to Calendar
Depending on how you look at it, John Glore is either in a great place, or a bind. He has a dual career in the theater, as a playwright and a literary manager-dramaturge for South Coast Repertory. But those two roles could as easily conflict as complement each other. "There are ways in which it feeds me, and certainly I feel well-nourished by my dramaturge's knowledge of the great plays," he says. "But there's a lot of creative energy that goes into being a good dramaturge.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 31, 1999 | MICHAEL PHILLIPS, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
John Glore's new comedy "On the Jump" makes few demands on an audience. Chiefly it demands to be described by way of the paradox--"mildly madcap," for example. It's like a Preston Sturges farce played at half-speed; you want it to really take off, to send its characters colliding, yet there's a fogged, dreamy quality to Glore's writing. Sometimes it's affecting. Other times, it's simply at odds with the narrative devices employed.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 1999 | JAN BRESLAUER, Jan Breslauer is a regular contributor to Calendar
Depending on how you look at it, John Glore is either in a great place, or a bind. He has a dual career in the theater, as a playwright and a literary manager-dramaturge for South Coast Repertory. But those two roles could as easily conflict as complement each other. "There are ways in which it feeds me, and certainly I feel well-nourished by my dramaturge's knowledge of the great plays," he says. "But there's a lot of creative energy that goes into being a good dramaturge.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 27, 1997 | JAN HERMAN
If unproduced plays were sheep, South Coast Repertory's literary manager would be a shepherd. He has tended flocks of scripts over the last 13 years, helping the county's only professional resident theater earn a national reputation for bringing new plays to market. The job, though hardly pastoral, demands a shepherd's devotion, with its all-consuming hours. And that goes double for a literary manager who also is a playwright with ambitions for getting his work produced.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 1989 | LYNNE HEFFLEY
Good children's plays are hard to come by. That's one reason you see so many Snow Whites and Cinderellas treading the boards. Last spring, though, South Coast Repertory asked its own literary manager, John Glore, to write a play for the Young Conservatory Players, 10-to-17-year-old members of SCR's youth theater training program who put on several shows a year. The result--Glore's refreshingly different "Wind of a Thousand Tales," in which a pragmatic little girl named Kimberly-Kay discovered her own imagination by taking a magical journey through three folk tales--was one of the Players' finest offerings.
NEWS
January 9, 2003
It's nice to see that The Times deems the Mark Taper Forum's upcoming production of Culture Clash's "Chavez Ravine" worthy of special mention ("Where You Should Be in 2003," Jan. 2). However, as a longtime fan of Culture Clash and the L.A. Dodgers, I feel I should point out that the article perpetuates a falsehood that the play aims to correct. The Mexican American community that lived in Chavez Ravine during the first half of the 20th century was not displaced by Dodger Stadium. The people of Chavez Ravine were relocated eight years before ground was broken for the stadium, to make way for a planned public housing project.
NEWS
May 26, 1999
WINE-TASTING Sonoma wines highlight the Arthritis Foundation's wine-tasting, DoubleTree Hotel, 3050 Bristol St., Costa Mesa, 6 tonight. $35-$40. (714) 436-1623. JAZZ John Henderson and his Great Swing Band perform at 8 tonight at the American Legion Hall, 143 S. Lemon St., Orange. $7. (714) 538-8570. THEATER John Glore's comedy "On the Jump" previews at South Coast Repertory, 655 Town Center Drive, Costa Mesa. 8 tonight and Thursday. (714) 708-5555.
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